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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Patricia Kowalczyk had been suffering with neck and shoulder pain for years when her doctor offered her a shot of Botox. The 60-year-old wasn't interested in smoothing her frown lines. But Johns Hopkins' Dr. Paul Christo wasn't offering the popular cosmetic procedure most often associated with the botulinum toxin that paralyzes nerves and muscles. He wanted to give her one small, carefully aimed dose to knock out the ache that made daily activity a chore. "Most of the public doesn't realize Botox is used for medical purposes," said Christo, an assistant professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine in Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's division of pain medicine.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland is moving to toughen regulations on the fast-growing medspa industry - a move designed to narrow a "loophole" and prevent deaths such as one last year following a liposuction treatment at a Timonium facility. Regulations being discussed by state officials would bar plastic surgeons from performing liposuction and other procedures in medspas and medical offices unless the facilities are inspected by the government or third-party accrediting bodies, Maryland Secretary of Health Joshua Sharfstein said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
When Sandy Rosenblatt looked in the mirror, the striking brunette could see nothing but one big flaw — her eyes, which were sunken and seemed a little dark. So at 34 she had a plastic surgeon smooth them over. While she was there, she decided to have her long oval face made a little cheekier and her brows a little less creased. Since then the Sterling, Va., resident has had to return to her doctor in Baltimore several times a year for new applications of commercial fillers and wrinkle removers, a drawback of such products.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | July 25, 2012
A growing number of people looking for less invasive procedures than plastic surgery or Botox injections to do away with wrinkles and sagging jawlines are turning to the ancient Chinese-rooted practice of acupuncture. And they are starting to come to Laurel's Main Street for the treatment. Since late 2011, acupuncturist Janet Young, of Laurel, has offered facial rejuvenation treatments at the Neighborhood Acupuncture center in the 300 block of Main Street. A master's-degree graduate of the Tai Sophia Institute in North Laurel, Young said using acupuncture to slow the aging process is not a quick fix like Botox, which relaxes the muscles and provides immediate results, but it does work.
BUSINESS
By Ronald D. White and Ronald D. White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 2002
Kimberly Horowitz is an international gem buyer specializing in diamonds, brokering deals in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. In her line of work, a confident, relaxed appearance can be the difference between negotiating a great price or merely a good one. That's why she decided her crow's feet had to go. "Lines and furrows make you look tense or worried even when you're not. In my job, I try to have a poker face," said Horowitz, who is 41. The...
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2002
Gordon Nelson is the first brave soul to go under the needle, surrounded by a group of curious women sipping Diet Coke or red wine and eating strawberries. He's a pleasant, fit-looking man in his late 30s whose face is relatively unlined by the standards of most of the people gathered here at the Gloria Brennan Salon and Day Spa in Pikesville. But those pesky furrows across his forehead bother him, so he's having them injected with Botox, the hottest new weapon in the fight against Father Time.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 12, 2004
Under the best of circumstances, the Piano Concerto No. 1 by Johannes Brahms can be a scary prospect for a soloist. The outer movements abound in two-fisted, blood-and-guts action; the rapt Adagio in between calls for an exceptionally poetic touch. Ultimately, what the concerto demands from the pianist is total, unconditional victory. So why is Leon Fleisher, who hasn't enjoyed full, free use of his right hand for almost 40 years, attempting such a task in Baltimore this week? "It's interesting and it's fun," he says.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | January 27, 2006
A Florida doctor has been sentenced to three years in federal prison, the stiffest punishment allowed, for giving a toxic injection to two patients left temporarily paralyzed from what they thought was the anti-wrinkle drug Botox. Toxic injection? Isn't that what the Pacers just gave the Kings in the Ron Artest trade? roch.kubatko@baltsun.com For more "Roch Around the Clock," go to baltimoresun.com/roch
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Maryland is moving to toughen regulations on the fast-growing medspa industry - a move designed to narrow a "loophole" and prevent deaths such as one last year following a liposuction treatment at a Timonium facility. Regulations being discussed by state officials would bar plastic surgeons from performing liposuction and other procedures in medspas and medical offices unless the facilities are inspected by the government or third-party accrediting bodies, Maryland Secretary of Health Joshua Sharfstein said.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson | June 7, 1991
Five years ago, Mary Payton couldn't hold a conversation without her words slurring and her body contorting with each strained syllable.But as she spoke yesterday about a new technique that enables people like her to "get their voice back" within two weeks, not a stutter could be detected."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
When Sandy Rosenblatt looked in the mirror, the striking brunette could see nothing but one big flaw — her eyes, which were sunken and seemed a little dark. So at 34 she had a plastic surgeon smooth them over. While she was there, she decided to have her long oval face made a little cheekier and her brows a little less creased. Since then the Sterling, Va., resident has had to return to her doctor in Baltimore several times a year for new applications of commercial fillers and wrinkle removers, a drawback of such products.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2010
It's a sweaty kind of summer in Baltimore. And while the multiple days of triple-digit temperatures have made some people glisten and others drip, everyone seems to be seeking ways to dry off. Some are showering more or slathering on "clinical-strength" antiperspirant. Cosmetic surgeons are injecting Botox to block the nerves that stimulate sweat glands. And a procedure offered at a small number of hospitals locally and nationally snips nerves to offer a more permanent solution for those with extreme cases.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Patricia Kowalczyk had been suffering with neck and shoulder pain for years when her doctor offered her a shot of Botox. The 60-year-old wasn't interested in smoothing her frown lines. But Johns Hopkins' Dr. Paul Christo wasn't offering the popular cosmetic procedure most often associated with the botulinum toxin that paralyzes nerves and muscles. He wanted to give her one small, carefully aimed dose to knock out the ache that made daily activity a chore. "Most of the public doesn't realize Botox is used for medical purposes," said Christo, an assistant professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine in Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine's division of pain medicine.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2006
"Wear a smile and you have friends; wear a scowl and you have wrinkles." - George Eliot Inspired by age-old literary wisdom, countless song lyrics and the 1872 musings of Charles Darwin, a very 2006 theory to treat depression has emerged. Why not turn that frown upside down - with a shot of Botox? By preventing the physical act of frowning, the muscle-paralyzing toxin just might ease depression. A small-scale pilot trial, published in the May 15 journal Dermatologic Surgery, found that Botox injected into frown lines around the mouth or in forehead furrows of 10 women eliminated depression symptoms in nine of them and reduced symptoms in the 10th.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | January 27, 2006
A Florida doctor has been sentenced to three years in federal prison, the stiffest punishment allowed, for giving a toxic injection to two patients left temporarily paralyzed from what they thought was the anti-wrinkle drug Botox. Toxic injection? Isn't that what the Pacers just gave the Kings in the Ron Artest trade? roch.kubatko@baltsun.com For more "Roch Around the Clock," go to baltimoresun.com/roch
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | July 25, 2004
I hear you can get botox injections to stop you from sweating. Fact or fiction? How long does it last, and what does it cost? Before you toss your deodorant sticks and beeline it to the nearest cosmetic surgeon, let's get one thing straight. Sweat is good. It cools us off. It proves we're working hard. Heck, sweat can even be sexy (think Jennifer Beals in Flashdance or Brad Pitt in Fight Club). That said, what you've heard is not a myth. Botox injections paralyze the nerves that stimulate your sweat glands.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | October 5, 2003
Botox was just the beginning. The popularity of the injectable toxin seemed to prove that people wanted wrinkle cures without surgery. So as hundreds of thousands of Americans rushed to get the muscle-paralyzing treatment -- even those who had never sought cosmetic procedures -- plastic surgeons and drug manufacturers were working to come up with other simple tricks to smooth aging skin. And they seem to have succeeded. A new generation of injectable substances -- used to treat facial lines, scars and depressions -- has begun hitting the market.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | July 25, 2012
A growing number of people looking for less invasive procedures than plastic surgery or Botox injections to do away with wrinkles and sagging jawlines are turning to the ancient Chinese-rooted practice of acupuncture. And they are starting to come to Laurel's Main Street for the treatment. Since late 2011, acupuncturist Janet Young, of Laurel, has offered facial rejuvenation treatments at the Neighborhood Acupuncture center in the 300 block of Main Street. A master's-degree graduate of the Tai Sophia Institute in North Laurel, Young said using acupuncture to slow the aging process is not a quick fix like Botox, which relaxes the muscles and provides immediate results, but it does work.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 12, 2004
Under the best of circumstances, the Piano Concerto No. 1 by Johannes Brahms can be a scary prospect for a soloist. The outer movements abound in two-fisted, blood-and-guts action; the rapt Adagio in between calls for an exceptionally poetic touch. Ultimately, what the concerto demands from the pianist is total, unconditional victory. So why is Leon Fleisher, who hasn't enjoyed full, free use of his right hand for almost 40 years, attempting such a task in Baltimore this week? "It's interesting and it's fun," he says.
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