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By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN Staff | November 5, 2006
Johannesburg, South Africa -- When former President P.W. Botha died Tuesday at age 90, many South Africans expected the current black-led government to do, well, nothing. After all, the finger-wagging Botha was a hated figure who fiercely defended the apartheid system of white rule through the tumultuous 1980s, a time when over 30,000 people were detained and scores killed by security forces, their bodies sometimes blown up to hide the crime. Yes, he scrapped some apartheid laws, including a ban on interracial sex and marriage, but many critics say he was hell-bent on keeping power in the hands of the white minority as long as possible.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN Staff | November 5, 2006
Johannesburg, South Africa -- When former President P.W. Botha died Tuesday at age 90, many South Africans expected the current black-led government to do, well, nothing. After all, the finger-wagging Botha was a hated figure who fiercely defended the apartheid system of white rule through the tumultuous 1980s, a time when over 30,000 people were detained and scores killed by security forces, their bodies sometimes blown up to hide the crime. Yes, he scrapped some apartheid laws, including a ban on interracial sex and marriage, but many critics say he was hell-bent on keeping power in the hands of the white minority as long as possible.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 24, 1998
GEORGE, South Africa -- Apartheid-era President P. W. Botha bowed to the law of this changed land yesterday and appeared unremorseful before a black magistrate on a charge of contempt for his refusal to testify to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- Mike Tyson proved he was ready to tackle bigger game after knocking out Francois Botha, South Africa's self-proclaimed "White Buffalo," at 2: 59 of the fifth round last night at the MGM Grand Garden. But, the former heavyweight champion raised as many questions as he provided answers with his uneven performance.After being frustrated by failing to land a telling punch in the first four rounds, trailing on all three scorecards, the 7-1 favorite ended the scheduled 10-rounder in explosive fashion with a straight right hand.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 20, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A defiant former state President Pieter W. Botha ignored yesterday his third subpoena to appear before the nation's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, risking imprisonment and a fine.The 81-year-old apartheid-era politician is refusing to testify on the workings of the State Security Council, which advised the white-minority government on strategy during some of the worst human rights violations by the security forces here.He was expected to be questioned about the killings by security forces of anti-apartheid activists and about South African military raids into neighboring countries fighting leftist insurgencies or harboring South Africa "freedom fighters."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- Since being anointed "the opponent" for former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson in his latest comeback bid at the MGM Grand tonight, Francois Botha has endured the jokes about being headed for extinction like the "White Buffalo" nickname he favors.But as fight night approaches, the bulky South African native has exhibited no signs of stage fright or a trembling in his voice or legs that characterized so many of Tyson's previous foes.It's not because Tyson has not tried to work his usual intimidating act. When asked what he expects Botha to do tonight, he replied, "Die."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 8, 1998
GEORGE, South Africa -- The trial here of former President P. W. Botha marks a watershed in this country's search for closure to its shameful apartheid past.Whether he is found guilty or innocent, the appearance of the elderly white separatist before a young black magistrate showcases the "new dispensation" here.Botha's fate, to be announced after final legal arguments June 15, is all but irrelevant. At age 82, and nine years after leaving office, he is clearly yesteryear's man in a country focusing on its future under majority, instead of minority, rule.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- Mike Tyson proved he was ready to tackle bigger game after knocking out Francois Botha, South Africa's self-proclaimed "White Buffalo," at 2: 59 of the fifth round last night at the MGM Grand Garden. But, the former heavyweight champion raised as many questions as he provided answers with his uneven performance.After being frustrated by failing to land a telling punch in the first four rounds, trailing on all three scorecards, the 7-1 favorite ended the scheduled 10-rounder in explosive fashion with a straight right hand.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 8, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Former South African President Pieter W. Botha -- a chief figure during some of the worst human rights violations of the apartheid era -- was ordered yesterday to appear in court for his refusal to testify to the commission that is trying to lay to rest this country's apartheid past.Botha, 81, is a key witness as a former president, prime minister and chairman of the national security council, which advised the white minority government on strategy during the 1980s.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | December 6, 1994
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Three years ago, Koos Botha was figuring out how to plant bombs against black progress in the old South Africa. Now, he's figuring out how to build houses in the new one.The story of the transformation of this one-time right-wing radical seems to sum up the struggle for the soul of the Afrikaner, the white settlers of this land who are so full of contradictions.They fought a courageous war at the end of the 19th century against the oppression of the British and then proceeded in this century to unleash their own oppression against black South Africans.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- Mike Tyson's new handlers, manager Shelly Finkel and promoter Dan Goosen, have been trying desperately to make the former heavyweight champion more civil in his dealings with the media leading up to tonight's comeback fight against Francois Botha. But judging by results, the spin doctors are losing control.Each day, Tyson seems to say something more outrageous that only confirms he is not the least bit interested in changing his public image as a human time bomb bent on self-destruction.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- Since being anointed "the opponent" for former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson in his latest comeback bid at the MGM Grand tonight, Francois Botha has endured the jokes about being headed for extinction like the "White Buffalo" nickname he favors.But as fight night approaches, the bulky South African native has exhibited no signs of stage fright or a trembling in his voice or legs that characterized so many of Tyson's previous foes.It's not because Tyson has not tried to work his usual intimidating act. When asked what he expects Botha to do tonight, he replied, "Die."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- "Murder, Plain and Simple," read the headline on an editorial by Randy Gordon in the June 1984 issue of the Ring magazine.It was a poignant recapitulation of the sordid events that took place in the ring at Madison Square Garden a year earlier, leading to the death of promising junior middleweight Billy Ray Collins Jr.That night, Collins, 21, a crowd-pleasing fighter with a 14-0 record who was being hailed as a title contender, took a fearful...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 8, 1998
GEORGE, South Africa -- The trial here of former President P. W. Botha marks a watershed in this country's search for closure to its shameful apartheid past.Whether he is found guilty or innocent, the appearance of the elderly white separatist before a young black magistrate showcases the "new dispensation" here.Botha's fate, to be announced after final legal arguments June 15, is all but irrelevant. At age 82, and nine years after leaving office, he is clearly yesteryear's man in a country focusing on its future under majority, instead of minority, rule.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 2, 1998
GEORGE, South Africa -- "Eliminate," "destroy" or "neutralize" -- such was the fate decreed by South Africa's security chiefs for the enemies of the white-supremacist apartheid state in the 1980s.But did they mean "kill"?That is the crucial question that South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission has tried to put to former President P. W. Botha for the past year.Three times he has refused to honor a subpoena from the commission, and now, still defiant, he sits in magistrates court awaiting his fate on a charge of contempt.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 24, 1998
GEORGE, South Africa -- Apartheid-era President P. W. Botha bowed to the law of this changed land yesterday and appeared unremorseful before a black magistrate on a charge of contempt for his refusal to testify to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission."
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | July 26, 1991
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Foreign Minister Roelof F. "Pik" Botha admitted yesterday that the South African government secretly paid more than $35 million to political rivals of a Namibian rebel organization in that country's pre-independence elections in 1989.Mr. Botha said his government gave the money to seven political parties opposed to the Southwest Africa People's Organization in the hope of defeating the rebel group, which had waged war for years against South African rule of the territory.
NEWS
May 1, 1996
Richard Morris, 72, who wrote the book for the musical "The Unsinkable Molly Brown," died Saturday of cancer in Los Angeles.Among his other successes was his screenplay for "Thoroughly Modern Millie," the 1967 film that starred Julie Andrews. He also wrote the screenplays for 1951's "Finders Keepers" and 1952's "Ma and Pa Kettle at the Fair."David D. Petersen, 54, a leading expert on financial planning for terminally ill patients, died Monday of AIDS in New York. He was among the first in the United States to advise AIDS patients how to sell their life insurance policies for cash.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 8, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Former South African President Pieter W. Botha -- a chief figure during some of the worst human rights violations of the apartheid era -- was ordered yesterday to appear in court for his refusal to testify to the commission that is trying to lay to rest this country's apartheid past.Botha, 81, is a key witness as a former president, prime minister and chairman of the national security council, which advised the white minority government on strategy during the 1980s.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 20, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A defiant former state President Pieter W. Botha ignored yesterday his third subpoena to appear before the nation's Truth and Reconciliation Commission, risking imprisonment and a fine.The 81-year-old apartheid-era politician is refusing to testify on the workings of the State Security Council, which advised the white-minority government on strategy during some of the worst human rights violations by the security forces here.He was expected to be questioned about the killings by security forces of anti-apartheid activists and about South African military raids into neighboring countries fighting leftist insurgencies or harboring South Africa "freedom fighters."
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