Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBotanist
IN THE NEWS

Botanist

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| October 8, 2013
The next time you're in a liquor store browsing the shelves, imagine you're strolling through a garden. That bottle of gin is a juniper bush with citrus peels and maybe some coriander and even lavender thrown in for good measure. Tequila? Made from the roasted heart of an agave plant. The wine - that's easy - is a tangle of grapevines. That every spirits shop is a garden is the subject of Amy Stewart's best-selling book, "The Drunken Botanist: The Plants that Create the World's Great Drinks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
With its four terraces of thriving plants sloping down toward a babbling lily pond, Jim Duke's garden could certainly be considered a healing place. And that's precisely what the world-renowned botanist and author's Green Farmacy Garden is. Featuring 80 plots that showcase 300 plants for whatever ails you — from addictions to yeast infections and everything in between — the garden is a living catalog of herbal medicine. From 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, the Howard County Conservancy will sponsor a lecture and guided tour of the garden at the Fulton home Jim Duke shares with his wife, Peggy.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 21, 2007
Floral potpourri -- Lakeside Cafe & Deli in the American City Building, 10227 Wincopin Circle, Columbia, is showing A Floral Potpourri, watercolors by botanical illustrator Peggy Duke through Nov. 2. Duke, who lives in Fulton with her husband, botanist and author James Duke, is a member of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators and the Society of Women Geographers. Cafe hours are from 7 am. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. 410-772-3694 or 301-498-3946.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard
For The Baltimore Sun
| October 8, 2013
The next time you're in a liquor store browsing the shelves, imagine you're strolling through a garden. That bottle of gin is a juniper bush with citrus peels and maybe some coriander and even lavender thrown in for good measure. Tequila? Made from the roasted heart of an agave plant. The wine - that's easy - is a tangle of grapevines. That every spirits shop is a garden is the subject of Amy Stewart's best-selling book, "The Drunken Botanist: The Plants that Create the World's Great Drinks.
NEWS
September 30, 1993
* F. Raymond Fosberg, 85, a tropical plant expert and botanist emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, died of cancer Saturday in Falls Church, Va. He joined the Agriculture Department in 1940 and during World War II searched for wild cinchona trees in South America. At the time, the trees were the only source of quinine, a treatment for malaria. He worked as a botanist for the U.S. Geological Survey from 1950 to 1965 before joining the Smithsonian. He published more than 600 papers and contributed to many books related to his field.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | February 16, 1991
To most Americans, the desert that links Kuwait and Saudi Arabia seems a dreadful place indeed. Television shows us a desolate landscape, seemingly bereft of vegetation. The region appears to be an endless swath of sand, punctuated only by trenches and tank tracks.Surely flora cannot exist in such a wasteland.Oh, but it can.Spring is nigh in the Persian Gulf. Despite all the bombs and missiles, much of the desert is coming to life.The changes may be startling.Imagine allied troops marching through colorful pockets of wildflowers, grasses and flowering bulbs.
NEWS
By LORI SEARS and LORI SEARS,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
Here's a sampling of wildflower walks around the state. Many places also offer self-guided walks. Call for information. APRIL 5 1. Nature walk Chris Manning of the Baltimore Bird Club leads walkers through Cylburn's trails for signs of spring plants and more, at 9 a.m. at Cylburn Mansion, 4915 Greenspring Ave. Walks also take place April 12, 19 and 26. Free. Call 410-367-2217. APRIL 10 2. Kids' wildflower walk Look for the first signs of spring, learn to identify wildflowers and learn about their history, 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m. at Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Ave., Wheaton.
NEWS
April 17, 1995
Maria Gorbachev, 84, the mother of former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, died Saturday in Moscow. She had been hospitalized since suffering a stroke last month.William M. Smith, 79, a civil rights activist and retired bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, died Wednesday in Mobile, Ala. For several years, he was listed among Ebony magazine's 100 most influential blacks in the United States. He was a former state president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and delivered the opening invocation at the 1988 Republican convention in New Orleans.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- When your woods are on fire, your home washed away, it's hard to see fire and flood as anything but calamities, but scientists see nature maintaining its ecological balance.Let your gaze sweep across the planet, these scientists say, and the forces of nature become forces for good, causing far less harm than our attempts to bring them under control.Two studies reported in recent issues of Science, the journal of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science, conclude that natural disasters help maintain nature's balance in places as different as the prairies of Wisconsin and the rivers of northern California.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
March is called the beginning of the calendar of the soul. It's a time of re-establishing connections with the world after winter's seclusion, of starting the search for spring.The act of finding it can be as simple as stepping outside with purpose.Looking for spring is an art, one that Jean Worthley has practiced to perfection. As the botanist takes you along for her daily walk, she trains your eye to the evidence of spring's arrival: the new colors tinting the old portrait.Here's the black pussy willow that's just starting to come out. They look like little black caterpillars, don't they?
NEWS
September 21, 2007
Floral potpourri -- Lakeside Cafe & Deli in the American City Building, 10227 Wincopin Circle, Columbia, is showing A Floral Potpourri, watercolors by botanical illustrator Peggy Duke through Nov. 2. Duke, who lives in Fulton with her husband, botanist and author James Duke, is a member of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators and the Society of Women Geographers. Cafe hours are from 7 am. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. 410-772-3694 or 301-498-3946.
BUSINESS
By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2002
SANTA CATALINA, Calif. - Botanist Denise Knapp was overjoyed when she discovered a patch of a rare rock cress growing in Santa Catalina Island's remote and foggy Wild Boar Gully nature preserve. The tiny flowering plant had not been seen on the Southern California island in three decades. But it suddenly flourished behind a fence erected two years ago to protect the area from deer and feral goats that used to browse vegetation to oblivion. "Now, you can almost hear the plants sighing with happiness and relief," Knapp said on a recent weekday hike into the 112-acre preserve where she had found the so-called Santa Cruz Island rock cress plant in April.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and By Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2001
You can be lulled by Japanese cherry trees and nursery-bred pear trees into believing that spring has truly arrived. They bloom, but then the temperature sinks back into the 40s. Better to trust cercis canadensis - the redbud. Their bare branches hazed with magenta flowers, these North American native trees first blossom in the region's warm corners - on sunny south-facing hillsides, in Eastern Shore forests, amid heat islands of city concrete. In pockets of persistent chill, they were on the verge of bloom, the buds a little fatter each fine day. Since the last Ice Age, natural selection has calibrated the internal clocks of wild redbuds, which grow in dappled sun along the edges of forests from Michigan to Mexico.
NEWS
By LORI SEARS and LORI SEARS,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
Here's a sampling of wildflower walks around the state. Many places also offer self-guided walks. Call for information. APRIL 5 1. Nature walk Chris Manning of the Baltimore Bird Club leads walkers through Cylburn's trails for signs of spring plants and more, at 9 a.m. at Cylburn Mansion, 4915 Greenspring Ave. Walks also take place April 12, 19 and 26. Free. Call 410-367-2217. APRIL 10 2. Kids' wildflower walk Look for the first signs of spring, learn to identify wildflowers and learn about their history, 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m. at Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Ave., Wheaton.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
March is called the beginning of the calendar of the soul. It's a time of re-establishing connections with the world after winter's seclusion, of starting the search for spring.The act of finding it can be as simple as stepping outside with purpose.Looking for spring is an art, one that Jean Worthley has practiced to perfection. As the botanist takes you along for her daily walk, she trains your eye to the evidence of spring's arrival: the new colors tinting the old portrait.Here's the black pussy willow that's just starting to come out. They look like little black caterpillars, don't they?
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1998
WALK ON THE wild side tonight with botanist David Pyle at the Manchester Parks Foundation Nature Center off Wilhelm Lane in Manchester.He'll lead you into nature's medicine cabinet, to seek medicinal plants that were treasured by people long ago.With today's emphasis on the pure and perfect prescription, plucking leaves or roots seems a risky route to overcoming illness. But many people enjoy learning about these medicinal plants while tramping through woods and fields.On the walk tonight, discussion of medical subjects and how to spot plants is geared toward adults.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and By Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2001
You can be lulled by Japanese cherry trees and nursery-bred pear trees into believing that spring has truly arrived. They bloom, but then the temperature sinks back into the 40s. Better to trust cercis canadensis - the redbud. Their bare branches hazed with magenta flowers, these North American native trees first blossom in the region's warm corners - on sunny south-facing hillsides, in Eastern Shore forests, amid heat islands of city concrete. In pockets of persistent chill, they were on the verge of bloom, the buds a little fatter each fine day. Since the last Ice Age, natural selection has calibrated the internal clocks of wild redbuds, which grow in dappled sun along the edges of forests from Michigan to Mexico.
BUSINESS
By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2002
SANTA CATALINA, Calif. - Botanist Denise Knapp was overjoyed when she discovered a patch of a rare rock cress growing in Santa Catalina Island's remote and foggy Wild Boar Gully nature preserve. The tiny flowering plant had not been seen on the Southern California island in three decades. But it suddenly flourished behind a fence erected two years ago to protect the area from deer and feral goats that used to browse vegetation to oblivion. "Now, you can almost hear the plants sighing with happiness and relief," Knapp said on a recent weekday hike into the 112-acre preserve where she had found the so-called Santa Cruz Island rock cress plant in April.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- When your woods are on fire, your home washed away, it's hard to see fire and flood as anything but calamities, but scientists see nature maintaining its ecological balance.Let your gaze sweep across the planet, these scientists say, and the forces of nature become forces for good, causing far less harm than our attempts to bring them under control.Two studies reported in recent issues of Science, the journal of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science, conclude that natural disasters help maintain nature's balance in places as different as the prairies of Wisconsin and the rivers of northern California.
NEWS
April 17, 1995
Maria Gorbachev, 84, the mother of former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, died Saturday in Moscow. She had been hospitalized since suffering a stroke last month.William M. Smith, 79, a civil rights activist and retired bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, died Wednesday in Mobile, Ala. For several years, he was listed among Ebony magazine's 100 most influential blacks in the United States. He was a former state president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and delivered the opening invocation at the 1988 Republican convention in New Orleans.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.