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Boston Tea Party

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NEWS
July 28, 2011
In colonial times, patriots dumped tea in Boston harbor in protest of unfair taxation by the tyrannical British. In today's Washington, the tyrants are members of the tea party. How ironic. They trumpet their patriotism in the form of intransigence to reduce the scope of government, saving it even if it means destroying it. Their allegiance is pledged to Grover Norquist instead of their oath of office to govern. The real threat posed by these rabid tea party freshmen is their completely clueless disregard in linking the raising of the debt ceiling to their fanatical demands.
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NEWS
July 16, 2013
I received my commercial property tax bill and cleverly concealed with no explanation was the much anticipated "rain tax" section of the bill. I knew it was going to be ugly, and so it was. I had already familiarized myself with the details. It was ironic that it showed up just a couple of days before the Fourth of July, the anniversary commemorating the Declaration of Independence from Great Britain. I was reminded of the Boston Tea Party, when patriots threw tea into Boston Harbor to protest the king's taxation without representation.
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NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | June 10, 1993
Los Angeles -- Across the UCLA campus from the Chican hunger strike, a student named Carlos Leon walked past the Sigma Nu fraternity house and thought he saw people dressed as Indians. He did. The fraternity was having a Boston Tea Party theme-party.The university, which cannot afford to provide enough classes to allow most students to graduate in four years, has launched an investigation to determine whether the party ''reinforced group stereotypes'' -- the thought being that white men disguising themselves as Indians 220 years ago might be offensive to today's Native Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 6, 2012
Wednesday, on the United States' 236th Independence Day, Ubisoft sent around the newest trailer for October's fervently-awaited "Assassin's Creed 3. " The trailer, titled "Rise," (watch it below) is 95 percent live-action scenes that will not appear in the game, but is nonetheless a powerful and well-crafted appetizer to keep the aura of the game alive in the minds of gamers a full business quarter before its release. I have to respectfully disagree with a couple industry writers and commentators who thought the trailer was "terrible," tapping into "good old Tea Party-style American nationalism" and (this is the best one)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 6, 2012
Wednesday, on the United States' 236th Independence Day, Ubisoft sent around the newest trailer for October's fervently-awaited "Assassin's Creed 3. " The trailer, titled "Rise," (watch it below) is 95 percent live-action scenes that will not appear in the game, but is nonetheless a powerful and well-crafted appetizer to keep the aura of the game alive in the minds of gamers a full business quarter before its release. I have to respectfully disagree with a couple industry writers and commentators who thought the trailer was "terrible," tapping into "good old Tea Party-style American nationalism" and (this is the best one)
NEWS
By Sara Olkon and Sara Olkon,Tribune Newspapers | April 15, 2009
As part of a nationwide tax rebellion, protesters, in a nod to the Boston Tea Party, have been sending tea bags to their representatives. The trouble is, the tea keeps getting mistaken for a hazardous substance. In Boulder, Colo., the district office of Rep. Jared Polis recently called for help after a lumpy white envelope with no return address arrived in the mail. The Boulder Fire Department's Hazardous Materials Response Team found a tea bag and a note reading "We the People, 1773." Earlier this month in Manchester, N.H., a hazmat team descended on the office of Rep. Carol Shea-Porter after employees opened an envelope marked "tax protest" and found a bunch of tea leaves.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
I received my commercial property tax bill and cleverly concealed with no explanation was the much anticipated "rain tax" section of the bill. I knew it was going to be ugly, and so it was. I had already familiarized myself with the details. It was ironic that it showed up just a couple of days before the Fourth of July, the anniversary commemorating the Declaration of Independence from Great Britain. I was reminded of the Boston Tea Party, when patriots threw tea into Boston Harbor to protest the king's taxation without representation.
NEWS
By KAREN HOSLER | January 1, 1995
Washington -- The problem arose the day after the November elections: How to quickly describe the political philosophies of the Republicans who have taken control of Congress.To call them conservative is to say that they breathe. Nearly all claim that label, but it isn't enough any more. Conservatives come in such a wide variety of shadings that you can't understand their politics until you know what their personal priorities are.Some conservatives are so opposed to government intrusion in private activities they wouldn't dream of regulating even sex, drugs or rock 'n' roll.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 17, 2010
If you read the op-ed pages these days, you'd be forgiven for thinking the GOP and the conservative movement have been taken over by know-nothing mobs, anti-intellectual demagogues and pitchfork-wielding bigots. There's no omnibus label for this argument, but it's a giveaway that a person subscribes to it if he or she describes the "tea party" movement as "tea baggers," an awfully telling bit of sophomoric condescension from the camp that affects the pose of being more high-minded. The case against the tea party movement is constantly evolving.
NEWS
By Linda Cotton | September 14, 1990
IF THIS were 1773, they would be throwing tea into the harbor. Instead, they have thrown out Sid Kramer in Montgomery County and launched an assault in Baltimore County that conceivably could unseat Dennis Rasmussen.Make no mistake; there is a rebellion brewing in the metropolitan counties. By now just about everybody has received one of those fated letters from the bank: New assessments have increased annual property taxes and the escrow fund is in the red; from now on mortgage payments will be higher.
NEWS
July 28, 2011
In colonial times, patriots dumped tea in Boston harbor in protest of unfair taxation by the tyrannical British. In today's Washington, the tyrants are members of the tea party. How ironic. They trumpet their patriotism in the form of intransigence to reduce the scope of government, saving it even if it means destroying it. Their allegiance is pledged to Grover Norquist instead of their oath of office to govern. The real threat posed by these rabid tea party freshmen is their completely clueless disregard in linking the raising of the debt ceiling to their fanatical demands.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | March 17, 2010
If you read the op-ed pages these days, you'd be forgiven for thinking the GOP and the conservative movement have been taken over by know-nothing mobs, anti-intellectual demagogues and pitchfork-wielding bigots. There's no omnibus label for this argument, but it's a giveaway that a person subscribes to it if he or she describes the "tea party" movement as "tea baggers," an awfully telling bit of sophomoric condescension from the camp that affects the pose of being more high-minded. The case against the tea party movement is constantly evolving.
NEWS
By Sara Olkon and Sara Olkon,Tribune Newspapers | April 15, 2009
As part of a nationwide tax rebellion, protesters, in a nod to the Boston Tea Party, have been sending tea bags to their representatives. The trouble is, the tea keeps getting mistaken for a hazardous substance. In Boulder, Colo., the district office of Rep. Jared Polis recently called for help after a lumpy white envelope with no return address arrived in the mail. The Boulder Fire Department's Hazardous Materials Response Team found a tea bag and a note reading "We the People, 1773." Earlier this month in Manchester, N.H., a hazmat team descended on the office of Rep. Carol Shea-Porter after employees opened an envelope marked "tax protest" and found a bunch of tea leaves.
NEWS
By KAREN HOSLER | January 1, 1995
Washington -- The problem arose the day after the November elections: How to quickly describe the political philosophies of the Republicans who have taken control of Congress.To call them conservative is to say that they breathe. Nearly all claim that label, but it isn't enough any more. Conservatives come in such a wide variety of shadings that you can't understand their politics until you know what their personal priorities are.Some conservatives are so opposed to government intrusion in private activities they wouldn't dream of regulating even sex, drugs or rock 'n' roll.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | June 10, 1993
Los Angeles -- Across the UCLA campus from the Chican hunger strike, a student named Carlos Leon walked past the Sigma Nu fraternity house and thought he saw people dressed as Indians. He did. The fraternity was having a Boston Tea Party theme-party.The university, which cannot afford to provide enough classes to allow most students to graduate in four years, has launched an investigation to determine whether the party ''reinforced group stereotypes'' -- the thought being that white men disguising themselves as Indians 220 years ago might be offensive to today's Native Americans.
NEWS
By Linda Cotton | September 14, 1990
IF THIS were 1773, they would be throwing tea into the harbor. Instead, they have thrown out Sid Kramer in Montgomery County and launched an assault in Baltimore County that conceivably could unseat Dennis Rasmussen.Make no mistake; there is a rebellion brewing in the metropolitan counties. By now just about everybody has received one of those fated letters from the bank: New assessments have increased annual property taxes and the escrow fund is in the red; from now on mortgage payments will be higher.
NEWS
June 12, 2005
A mass meeting of Harford citizens convened on June 11, 1774. It was seven months after the Boston Tea Party, and a resolution was passed pledging support and aid to the people of Boston, who had been deprived of the means of procuring subsistence by an act to block Boston's port, imposed by the British government in response to the Tea Party. A further resolution expressed the willingness of Harford residents to join in an association with other counties of the province to oppose the importation of any kind of produce or merchandise from Great Britain.
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