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By John Donnelly and John Donnelly,BOSTON GLOBE | July 15, 2000
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Along a narrow concrete alley, where people live jammed together under tin roofs, a skinny young girl in pigtails sat in her front entryway and tucked a viola under her chin. The girl, Debora Tatgrin, played the instrument as if it were an extension of herself, the long fingers of her left hand skipping over its neck, performing Bach for neighborhood residents. Children on tiptoe appeared. They listened, eyes wide. Beneath them, trickles of filthy water flowed unnoticed past their feet.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In many a history of the Kennedy assassination during the past 50 years, mention has been made of the Boston Symphony Orchestra concert that was going on that awful Friday afternoon, and how the ensemble changed the program to play the Funeral March from Beethoven's "Eroica. " I have long wondered what that concert must have been like, how the audience responded when conductor Erich Leinsdorf broke the news, how the performance sounded. Audio from that event surfaced almost a year ago on -- where else?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Midweek Madness, distraught over them O's (as we say in Baltimore), was prepared to forget all about the World Series, until this droll reminder from the brass players of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra. This fun Wold Series video is all the more delightful for the surprise reinforcement in the Boston team.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
Midweek Madness, distraught over them O's (as we say in Baltimore), was prepared to forget all about the World Series, until this droll reminder from the brass players of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra. This fun Wold Series video is all the more delightful for the surprise reinforcement in the Boston team.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | June 15, 2001
The National Symphony Orchestra has appointed Nurit Bar-Josef as concertmaster, starting with the 2001-2002 season. Currently assistant concertmaster of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Pops, Bar-Josef succeeds William Steck, who retired from the NSO after nearly 20 years. Music director Leonard Slatkin praised Bar-Josef's "great artistic integrity and leadership skills" in a statement yesterday, and also saluted Elisabeth Adkins, the orchestra's current associate concertmaster and one of the four finalists - all women, coincidentally - for the position.
NEWS
January 24, 1997
Frances Jeffery Fahnestock, 81, a philanthropist and patron of the arts who was a descendant of Peregrine White, the first baby born on the Mayflower, died Jan. 17 in Boston after a long illness.Mrs. Fahnestock was a member of the boards of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Wang Center for the Performing Arts, Boston Opera Association and USS Constitution Museum.She was born in 1915 in Chicago to the Jeffery family, which built the Illinois Central Railroad, Mobile and Ohio Railroad, Denver and Rio Grand Railroad and Western Pacific Railroad.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1997
Renowned pianist Leon Fleisher yesterday announced publicly that he has left his position as artistic director of Tanglewood Music Center in Massachusetts, a post he has held since 1985.Fleisher, who also has taught at Peabody Institute for 39 years, yesterday sent a letter to Boston Symphony Orchestra music director Seiji Ozawa and to board members, in which he first thanked them for the opportunity to direct at Tanglewood, then stated: "I have not resigned. I consider myself to have been relieved of my position as Artistic Director."
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | October 24, 1994
The Boston Symphony Orchestra concert at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall Saturday night was the kind of great music-making one associates with the big five American orchestras. The ensemble is almost always flawless and the inner phrases always seem to be rehearsed and at the same time spontaneously executed.The orchestra perfectly adapted to music from three eras (contemporary, classical and romantic) with the kind of flexibility that all the great orchestras show when they have their music director on the podium.
NEWS
January 23, 2001
Norris Turney, 79, a jazz saxophonist, clarinetist and flutist who played in the last incarnation of Duke Ellington's orchestra, died of kidney failure Wednesday in Kettering, Ohio. Elizabeth Sewell, 81, a poet, critic and novelist, died Jan. 12 in Greensboro, N.C. She was the author of five books of criticism, including "The Orphic Voice," about the role of the imagination in literature and science. C. Malcolm Watkins, 89, a museum curator and collector of everyday objects, died Jan. 12 in Leesburg, Va. He spent 31 years of his career at the Smithsonian Institution, where he developed the first large exhibition hall devoted to everyday life in early America.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
Larry McCormick, 71, a longtime Los Angeles news anchor and public affairs host who was one of the city's first black TV news anchormen, died in that city Friday after a long illness. A fixture at television station KTLA since 1971, when he started as a weathercaster, Mr. McCormick filled a variety of on-air roles over the years, including delivering sports news and health and fitness reports. Born in Kansas City, Mo., Mr. McCormick studied theater at what is now the University of Missouri in Kansas City but changed his major to broadcasting.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
Larry McCormick, 71, a longtime Los Angeles news anchor and public affairs host who was one of the city's first black TV news anchormen, died in that city Friday after a long illness. A fixture at television station KTLA since 1971, when he started as a weathercaster, Mr. McCormick filled a variety of on-air roles over the years, including delivering sports news and health and fitness reports. Born in Kansas City, Mo., Mr. McCormick studied theater at what is now the University of Missouri in Kansas City but changed his major to broadcasting.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | June 15, 2001
The National Symphony Orchestra has appointed Nurit Bar-Josef as concertmaster, starting with the 2001-2002 season. Currently assistant concertmaster of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and Boston Pops, Bar-Josef succeeds William Steck, who retired from the NSO after nearly 20 years. Music director Leonard Slatkin praised Bar-Josef's "great artistic integrity and leadership skills" in a statement yesterday, and also saluted Elisabeth Adkins, the orchestra's current associate concertmaster and one of the four finalists - all women, coincidentally - for the position.
NEWS
January 23, 2001
Norris Turney, 79, a jazz saxophonist, clarinetist and flutist who played in the last incarnation of Duke Ellington's orchestra, died of kidney failure Wednesday in Kettering, Ohio. Elizabeth Sewell, 81, a poet, critic and novelist, died Jan. 12 in Greensboro, N.C. She was the author of five books of criticism, including "The Orphic Voice," about the role of the imagination in literature and science. C. Malcolm Watkins, 89, a museum curator and collector of everyday objects, died Jan. 12 in Leesburg, Va. He spent 31 years of his career at the Smithsonian Institution, where he developed the first large exhibition hall devoted to everyday life in early America.
NEWS
By John Donnelly and John Donnelly,BOSTON GLOBE | July 15, 2000
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Along a narrow concrete alley, where people live jammed together under tin roofs, a skinny young girl in pigtails sat in her front entryway and tucked a viola under her chin. The girl, Debora Tatgrin, played the instrument as if it were an extension of herself, the long fingers of her left hand skipping over its neck, performing Bach for neighborhood residents. Children on tiptoe appeared. They listened, eyes wide. Beneath them, trickles of filthy water flowed unnoticed past their feet.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1997
Renowned pianist Leon Fleisher yesterday announced publicly that he has left his position as artistic director of Tanglewood Music Center in Massachusetts, a post he has held since 1985.Fleisher, who also has taught at Peabody Institute for 39 years, yesterday sent a letter to Boston Symphony Orchestra music director Seiji Ozawa and to board members, in which he first thanked them for the opportunity to direct at Tanglewood, then stated: "I have not resigned. I consider myself to have been relieved of my position as Artistic Director."
NEWS
January 24, 1997
Frances Jeffery Fahnestock, 81, a philanthropist and patron of the arts who was a descendant of Peregrine White, the first baby born on the Mayflower, died Jan. 17 in Boston after a long illness.Mrs. Fahnestock was a member of the boards of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Wang Center for the Performing Arts, Boston Opera Association and USS Constitution Museum.She was born in 1915 in Chicago to the Jeffery family, which built the Illinois Central Railroad, Mobile and Ohio Railroad, Denver and Rio Grand Railroad and Western Pacific Railroad.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In many a history of the Kennedy assassination during the past 50 years, mention has been made of the Boston Symphony Orchestra concert that was going on that awful Friday afternoon, and how the ensemble changed the program to play the Funeral March from Beethoven's "Eroica. " I have long wondered what that concert must have been like, how the audience responded when conductor Erich Leinsdorf broke the news, how the performance sounded. Audio from that event surfaced almost a year ago on -- where else?
FEATURES
By David Conrads and David Conrads,Contributing Writer | August 15, 1993
In western Massachusetts, the hills really are alive with the sound of music.At least they are when Tanglewood, one of the world's premier music festivals and the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, has its season.Nestled in the serene beauty of the Berkshire Hills, in the quintessentially New England town of Lenox, Mass., Tanglewood 50 or more mostly classical concerts spread over nine weeks from the first of July through Labor Day weekend.It's the grande dame of American music festivals and attracts some of the most glittering stars on the international music scene.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff Writer | October 30, 1994
When the Philadelphia Orchestra returns to Meyerhoff Hall Tuesday after an absence of more than a decade, the occasion will mark the renewal of a long and passionate affair between Baltimore music lovers and one of the world's great orchestral ensembles.The Philadelphia Orchestra has played a unique role in the musical life of this city, nurturing, educating and expanding the artistic taste of its audiences. The orchestra raised performance standards in a city whose own local symphony for many years subsisted on a cultural level not much above that of a municipal band.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | October 24, 1994
The Boston Symphony Orchestra concert at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall Saturday night was the kind of great music-making one associates with the big five American orchestras. The ensemble is almost always flawless and the inner phrases always seem to be rehearsed and at the same time spontaneously executed.The orchestra perfectly adapted to music from three eras (contemporary, classical and romantic) with the kind of flexibility that all the great orchestras show when they have their music director on the podium.
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