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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 27, 2004
NEW YORK - What with the Red Sox perhaps on the verge of lifting a dreaded curse, a resident senator running neck-and-neck against an incumbent president and, now, a new leader generating sparks from the podium of the city's famed orchestra, Boston has a lot to crow about these days. Whatever happens at the World Series or the voting booth, the musical advantage should last for a long while. Last weekend, James Levine took his first bow as the 14th music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the first American-born holder of the title in the ensemble's 124 years.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In many a history of the Kennedy assassination during the past 50 years, mention has been made of the Boston Symphony Orchestra concert that was going on that awful Friday afternoon, and how the ensemble changed the program to play the Funeral March from Beethoven's "Eroica. " I have long wondered what that concert must have been like, how the audience responded when conductor Erich Leinsdorf broke the news, how the performance sounded. Audio from that event surfaced almost a year ago on -- where else?
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 22, 1998
In one of the rare instances in which writing about classical music gets noticed, a piece by music critic Greg Sandow about the Boston Symphony and its music director, Seiji Ozawa, in the Wall Street Journal last week has caused a storm in Beantown.Comparing the orchestra to "a painting that badly needs to be restored," Sandow, without using a single named source to support his assessment, insisted that the celebrated orchestra now has "the worst reputation of any American orchestra."Ozawa's concerts, according to Sandow, were "dismaying"; the conductor himself was "a samurai" who was kept in place because "he raises Japanese money the BSO can't do without."
NEWS
September 28, 2007
The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra opens its 47th season tonight and tomorrow with a program brought to you by the letter B. Maestro Jose-Luis Novo will begin his third year on the Maryland Hall podium by giving one of the most electrifying downbeats of the symphonic repertoire as his orchestra performs Beethoven's blisteringly intense Coriolan Overture. The music of Brahms is next, with the conductor and guest soloist Soovin Kim joining forces for the great German master's Violin Concerto in D Major.
FEATURES
February 25, 1992
A memorial service for conductor Andrew Schenck, originally scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, has been rescheduled by his family for 4 p.m. that day at the Church of Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St.An annual scholarship in his name has been established at Tanglewood, the summer home and school of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Contributions may be sent to the Andrew Schenck Memorial Fund in care of Robin Yorks, Boston Symphony, Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | October 7, 1994
A true American original will be on display at Maryland Hall this weekend.Not a sculpture or a painting, however, but a piano concerto written by Amy Marcy Cheney Beach (1867-1944), the first American woman ever to compose such a work.The concerto will be the centerpiece of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's season opening concerts at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow at Maryland Hall. Boston-based pianist Virginia Eskin will serve as soloist, with Gisele Ben-Dor on the podium.The program also includes "Hungarian Dances" by Brahms and the much underrated 6th Symphony of Antonin Dvorak.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 14, 2006
The new theme song in the orchestral world must be: "It's Hard out There for a Conductor." James Levine, celebrated music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera, fell onstage at the end of a concert in Boston on March 1 and apparently tore a rotator cuff. He has had to cancel the next few months of performances, leaving quite a large vacancy for both institutions to fill. Last month, Seiji Ozawa, music director of the Vienna State Opera and Levine's predecessor at the Boston Symphony, was told by doctors that he had to cancel the remainder of his entire 2006 season after a bronchial infection and a bout of shingles that had sidelined him in January.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 12, 1996
With my two principal sources of amusement -- our school system and the local arts scene -- shut down by the blizzard of '96, I take pen in hand in the midst of one of the slowest weeks in recent memory.Well, theaters may be dark and opera musicales canceled, but for well-stocked music lovers, even 22 inches of snow can't stop the hits from rolling in!The week's lull afforded an opportunity to get to know a new anthology of works by the Argentine master Alberto Ginastera (1916-1983) recorded by the Annapolis Symphony's own Gisele Ben-Dor (Koch International 7149)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | October 14, 1994
It was one of those concerts where the show's real star wasn't there.Gisele Ben-Dor and her Annapolis Symphony players ushered in the orchestra's 1994-1995 season with a delightful pair of Brahms Hungarian Dances, a strong, vigorous reading of the Sixth Symphony of Antonin Dvorak, and the Piano Concerto in C-sharp minor of Amy Beach (1867-1944).Boston-based Virginia Eskin, our foremost proponent of turn-of-the-century American music for the piano, served as soloist in the concerto.jTC But the evening's true sensation was dear old Amy Marcy Cheney Beach herself.
NEWS
June 26, 1999
Musical chairsFORTUNATELY, the eminent Russian conductor Yuri Temirkanov signed on as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra through the 2002-2003 season. That makes Baltimore a winner in the great conductor shuffle going on.Seiji Ozawa, the 63-year-old who has been music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra for 26 years, is quitting as of August 2002 to become music director of the Vienna State Opera.The nimble Japanese conductor who dances on the podium with pixie charm will be missed by many who believe he burnished that orchestra into the nation's greatest.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | September 12, 2006
Is no news good news? Both sides negotiating a new contract for Baltimore Symphony Orchestra musicians have maintained a media blackout, but, with the current contract set to expire Saturday night after the annual BSO gala, there are a few favorable signs - and also potential concerns. "I believe the talks took a quantum leap forward" last week, said BSO concertmaster Jonathan Carney. Also last week, Michael Bronfein, the BSO's new board chairman, said: "I think it's fair to say the talks are progressing."
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 14, 2006
The new theme song in the orchestral world must be: "It's Hard out There for a Conductor." James Levine, celebrated music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera, fell onstage at the end of a concert in Boston on March 1 and apparently tore a rotator cuff. He has had to cancel the next few months of performances, leaving quite a large vacancy for both institutions to fill. Last month, Seiji Ozawa, music director of the Vienna State Opera and Levine's predecessor at the Boston Symphony, was told by doctors that he had to cancel the remainder of his entire 2006 season after a bronchial infection and a bout of shingles that had sidelined him in January.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 27, 2004
NEW YORK - What with the Red Sox perhaps on the verge of lifting a dreaded curse, a resident senator running neck-and-neck against an incumbent president and, now, a new leader generating sparks from the podium of the city's famed orchestra, Boston has a lot to crow about these days. Whatever happens at the World Series or the voting booth, the musical advantage should last for a long while. Last weekend, James Levine took his first bow as the 14th music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the first American-born holder of the title in the ensemble's 124 years.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 7, 2003
Somewhere back in the 1970s, I heard part of a Boston Symphony Orchestra radio broadcast that featured a most unusual work. It was Steve Reich's Four Organs, scored for - guess what? - four organs, along with maracas. This was back in the wild, early days of minimalism, when a single chord and some rhythmic pulsating could provide hours of listening pleasure (or torture, depending on the listener). I'm not sure what such a work was doing on an orchestral program (the symphony players presumably were given something to do elsewhere in the concert)
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 11, 2000
The Boston Symphony Orchestra's visit to the Kennedy Center Concert Hall Saturday afternoon was a good news/bad news event. On the good news side, the ensemble lived up to its long-held reputation as one of this country's top five orchestras, giving a finely-honed, warm-toned response to music director Seiji Ozawa. The bad news was the programming. Instead of bringing, say, John Corigliano's Symphony No. 2, which the Boston players premiered a few days earlier - or anything out of the ordinary, for that matter - it was chestnut-roasting time.
NEWS
By John Donnelly and John Donnelly,BOSTON GLOBE | July 15, 2000
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Along a narrow concrete alley, where people live jammed together under tin roofs, a skinny young girl in pigtails sat in her front entryway and tucked a viola under her chin. The girl, Debora Tatgrin, played the instrument as if it were an extension of herself, the long fingers of her left hand skipping over its neck, performing Bach for neighborhood residents. Children on tiptoe appeared. They listened, eyes wide. Beneath them, trickles of filthy water flowed unnoticed past their feet.
FEATURES
By Steven Brown and Steven Brown,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 23, 1996
People who love music still love it when they go on vacation. And they don't have to leave music behind when they pack for their summer escape. Picnics with the Boston Symphony and opera amid the mountains of New Mexico are just a few of the opportunities awaiting music lovers. Here's a sample:Brevard Music Center, Brevard, N.C., June 28 through Aug. 11, offers solo recitals, chamber music, orchestral programs, musical theater and opera. Some of this year's best-known performers are mezzo-soprano Frederica von Stade, guitarist Christopher Parkening, tenor Gary Lakes and pianist Vladimir Feltsman.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 11, 2000
The Boston Symphony Orchestra's visit to the Kennedy Center Concert Hall Saturday afternoon was a good news/bad news event. On the good news side, the ensemble lived up to its long-held reputation as one of this country's top five orchestras, giving a finely-honed, warm-toned response to music director Seiji Ozawa. The bad news was the programming. Instead of bringing, say, John Corigliano's Symphony No. 2, which the Boston players premiered a few days earlier - or anything out of the ordinary, for that matter - it was chestnut-roasting time.
NEWS
June 26, 1999
Musical chairsFORTUNATELY, the eminent Russian conductor Yuri Temirkanov signed on as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra through the 2002-2003 season. That makes Baltimore a winner in the great conductor shuffle going on.Seiji Ozawa, the 63-year-old who has been music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra for 26 years, is quitting as of August 2002 to become music director of the Vienna State Opera.The nimble Japanese conductor who dances on the podium with pixie charm will be missed by many who believe he burnished that orchestra into the nation's greatest.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 22, 1998
In one of the rare instances in which writing about classical music gets noticed, a piece by music critic Greg Sandow about the Boston Symphony and its music director, Seiji Ozawa, in the Wall Street Journal last week has caused a storm in Beantown.Comparing the orchestra to "a painting that badly needs to be restored," Sandow, without using a single named source to support his assessment, insisted that the celebrated orchestra now has "the worst reputation of any American orchestra."Ozawa's concerts, according to Sandow, were "dismaying"; the conductor himself was "a samurai" who was kept in place because "he raises Japanese money the BSO can't do without."
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