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February 17, 2004
On February 13, 2004, JOHN E. BOST JR. Friends may call at Nutter Funeral Home Inc., 2501 Gwynns Falls Parkway on Tuesday 3 to 8 P.M. Family will receive friends on Wednesday at 10 A. M with funeral service to follow.
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | October 8, 2008
The Baltimore County school board voted last night to reject changing retirement plan services to a single provider, after a protest from hundreds of employees and the district's five labor groups. The board unanimously opposed the recommended contract with 403(b) plan provider Lincoln Financial Group, which would have moved away from the multiple vendors currently available to employees. Member Valerie A. Roddy recused herself. "What I think the board would like to see is possible scenarios of multiple vendors, certainly not going beyond the five who have ... answered the requests for proposals," said President JoAnn C. Murphy during the board's meeting last night.
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NEWS
May 21, 2003
On May 19, 2003, NANNIE MABLEMORRISON BOST. On Thursday friends may call at the Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Service, 5151 Balto. Nat'l Pike (Rt 40) from 3 to 4 P.M. On Friday, the family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11 A.M., with Services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 233-2400.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | April 2, 2008
Baltimore County teachers battling with County Executive James T. Smith Jr. over a lack of pay raises stepped up their pressure yesterday, marching outside his office and participating in a job action by working to contract rules. Leaders of the Teachers Association of Baltimore County said they arranged the rally outside the county courthouse in Towson to bring attention to the union's push for at least a 3 percent cost-of-living increase. "Today we have come together as a united team to strongly urge [Smith]
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
With Cheryl Bost, the new president of the Teachers Association of Baltimore County in place, the union can now decide whether to "work to rule," picket or take another kind of job action to protest the lack of raises this year. The union's 5,900 members are upset with County Executive James T. Smith Jr., who in June rejected a tentative deal giving them pay raises in exchange for higher health care contributions. Smith said the county couldn't afford it. "He really needs to pay teachers more," said Bost, who blames poor salaries and pensions for Baltimore County's problem retaining its 8,200 teachers.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | January 16, 2008
Angry that a proposed budget for the coming school year does not seek an across-the-board pay raise, about 200 Baltimore County teachers packed a public hearing last night to ask the school board to add an increase for them. County schools Superintendent Joe A. Hairston's proposed $1.18 billion spending plan for the fiscal year that starts July 1 includes a request for about $12 million to pay for longevity and step increases for teachers. But teachers and union officials said last night that without an across-the-board pay raise, more than 20 percent of the teachers - the county's most senior - will receive no increase at all, and an additional 20 percent, generally newer educators, will take a cut after paying more toward pension and health care expenses.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2002
For working to give her pupils the experiences they wouldn't otherwise have in their poor Essex community and for sticking with the kids who need her most at Mars Estates Elementary School, fourth-grade teacher Cheryl Bost was named Baltimore County's teacher of the year yesterday. "Teachers work hard, and we don't get a lot of thank you's," she said, "and this is the greatest thank you you could get." Mars Estates is in one of the county's poorest communities. Seventy-five percent of the pupils receive federally subsidized lunches, and many of those who start the year at Mars Estates finish at other schools.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | October 8, 2008
The Baltimore County school board voted last night to reject changing retirement plan services to a single provider, after a protest from hundreds of employees and the district's five labor groups. The board unanimously opposed the recommended contract with 403(b) plan provider Lincoln Financial Group, which would have moved away from the multiple vendors currently available to employees. Member Valerie A. Roddy recused herself. "What I think the board would like to see is possible scenarios of multiple vendors, certainly not going beyond the five who have ... answered the requests for proposals," said President JoAnn C. Murphy during the board's meeting last night.
SPORTS
December 29, 1991
The Warriors' Tim Hardaway shot an NBA-record 0-for-17 Friday night in a 106-102 victory against the Timberwolves. The record:Player, Team, Year.. .. .. ..FutilityTim Hardaway, G.State, '91.. .0-for-17Howie Dallmar, Phila, '48.. .0-for-15Dick Ricketts, Roch., '56.. .0-for-15Corky Devlin, F. Wayne, '56..0-for-15Charlie Tyra, N.Y., '57.. .. 0-for-15Frank Ramsey, Bost., '60.. ..0-for-15Ray Williams, N.J., '81.. .. 0-for-15Rodney McCray, Sacr., '88.. .0-for-15
BUSINESS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1995
If you were inventing a lawyer to join a state's attorney's office, how could you improve on Donald Bost?Mr. Bost's credentials appear impeccable, from his solid law-school grades to the prestigious, post-graduate clerkship he landed with Judge Robert L. Karwacki of the Maryland Court of Appeals.Then there's Mr. Bost's familiarity with the criminal justice system, acquired over 11 years as a Baltimore police officer.But applications to Maryland's 13 state's attorney's offices yielded no job offers -- and only one interview.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | January 16, 2008
Angry that a proposed budget for the coming school year does not seek an across-the-board pay raise, about 200 Baltimore County teachers packed a public hearing last night to ask the school board to add an increase for them. County schools Superintendent Joe A. Hairston's proposed $1.18 billion spending plan for the fiscal year that starts July 1 includes a request for about $12 million to pay for longevity and step increases for teachers. But teachers and union officials said last night that without an across-the-board pay raise, more than 20 percent of the teachers - the county's most senior - will receive no increase at all, and an additional 20 percent, generally newer educators, will take a cut after paying more toward pension and health care expenses.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY | January 12, 2006
Baltimore County officials expressed confidence yesterday that the county would be able to support the school system's proposed $1 billion operating budget for the next fiscal year. County spokesman Donald I. Mohler said it is too early to comment on specific aspects of the school budget, but "we expect to be strong supporters of it again this year." County Council Chairman John Olszewski Sr. had not yet seen the proposal. "I look forward to the budget process, where we'll closely scrutinize the budget," he said, noting that the council has not cut any requests from the budget during his seven years as a councilman.
NEWS
February 17, 2004
On February 13, 2004, JOHN E. BOST JR. Friends may call at Nutter Funeral Home Inc., 2501 Gwynns Falls Parkway on Tuesday 3 to 8 P.M. Family will receive friends on Wednesday at 10 A. M with funeral service to follow.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
With Cheryl Bost, the new president of the Teachers Association of Baltimore County in place, the union can now decide whether to "work to rule," picket or take another kind of job action to protest the lack of raises this year. The union's 5,900 members are upset with County Executive James T. Smith Jr., who in June rejected a tentative deal giving them pay raises in exchange for higher health care contributions. Smith said the county couldn't afford it. "He really needs to pay teachers more," said Bost, who blames poor salaries and pensions for Baltimore County's problem retaining its 8,200 teachers.
NEWS
May 21, 2003
On May 19, 2003, NANNIE MABLEMORRISON BOST. On Thursday friends may call at the Vaughn C. Greene Funeral Service, 5151 Balto. Nat'l Pike (Rt 40) from 3 to 4 P.M. On Friday, the family will receive friends from 10:30 to 11 A.M., with Services to follow. Inquiries to (410) 233-2400.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2002
For working to give her pupils the experiences they wouldn't otherwise have in their poor Essex community and for sticking with the kids who need her most at Mars Estates Elementary School, fourth-grade teacher Cheryl Bost was named Baltimore County's teacher of the year yesterday. "Teachers work hard, and we don't get a lot of thank you's," she said, "and this is the greatest thank you you could get." Mars Estates is in one of the county's poorest communities. Seventy-five percent of the pupils receive federally subsidized lunches, and many of those who start the year at Mars Estates finish at other schools.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
In retrospect, some say it was a big to-do about nothing. But when an e-mail went out from Baltimore County's new superintendent, Joe A. Hairston, Friday saying that school system employees couldn't wear jeans, shorts or sandals without socks or hose on "Casual Fridays," jaws dropped. Most upset were teachers. Many thought the directive - sent to all administrators - was aimed at them and that the Friday prohibitions extended to the other days of the week as well. "We got a ton of calls at TABCO," said Cheryl Bost, vice president of the Teachers Association of Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2000
In retrospect, some say it was a big to-do about nothing. But when an e-mail went out from Baltimore County's new superintendent, Joe A. Hairston, Friday saying that school system employees couldn't wear jeans, shorts or sandals without socks or hose on "Casual Fridays," jaws dropped. Most upset were teachers. Many thought the directive - sent to all administrators - was aimed at them and that the Friday prohibitions extended to the other days of the week as well. "We got a ton of calls at TABCO," said Cheryl Bost, vice president of the Teachers Association of Baltimore County.
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