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NEWS
November 19, 1994
Renato Boscoli, 65, a composer who was one of the creators of Brazil's bossa nova music, has died after a battle with cancer, a spokesman for a Rio de Janeiro hospital said yesterday. He worked closely with Rio Brazilian composers Tom Jobim, Vinicius de Moraes and Carlos Lyra in the 1950s to develop the bossa nova sound.Don A. Schanche, 68, a foreign correspondent, author and editor who covered the birth of the American space program and most of the world's conflicts in the last 40 years, died of cancer Thursday in Key Biscayne, Fla.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Adam Bernstein, The Washington Post | March 8, 2012
Joe Byrd, a bassist who was best known for collaborations with his guitarist brother Charlie and who helped introduce bossa nova-inflected jazz to the United States, died March 6 at Anne Arundel Medical Center from injuries suffered in a car accident that day. He was 78. Mr. Byrd, who also played guitar and was billed early in his career under his given name, Gene, was the youngest of four musical brothers who grew up in Virginia's Tidewater region....
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 10, 2000
Set to the sighing, lilting sensuality of Tom Jobim's swaying love ballads, "Bossa Nova" is a pleasant enough little visual vacation. If its story and characters aren't exactly the stuff of great literature or cinema, filmgoers can still enjoy the lush beauty of Rio de Janeiro, the poetry of the Portuguese language and the silky magnetism of lead actor Antonio Fagundes if they don't pay too much attention to the movie's wispy premise. That premise is love, here portrayed in permutations worthy of the ditziest soap opera.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | March 31, 2009
Diana Krall [Verve Records] *** (3 STARS) On Quiet Nights, the new album by Diana Krall, the jazz singer-pianist sways with the gentle rhythms of bossa nova. It's a sound that's familiar to Krall, and she handles it well. But this is the first time the Grammy winner has devoted an entire album to the style. The CD, out Tuesday, is her first release since giving birth to twin boys two years ago. In a way, Quiet Nights extends the elegant feel of Krall's last album, the excellent From This Moment On. Her hushed, Shirley Horn-like vocals are warmly embraced by tastefully understated orchestration overseen by the legendary Claus Ogerman.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 7, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Jazz saxophonist Stan Getz, who set off the bossa nova rage of the early 1960s, reviving a career that was almost shattered by drugs a decade earlier, died at his Malibu home yesterday.The noted 64-year-old musician had been in and out of St. John's Hospital and Health Center in suburban Santa Monica for treatment in a battle with liver cancer over about five years, his son, Steve, said.With his feather-light, seemingly effortless style, Mr. Getz had been a major jazz figure almost from the first, as a teen-age sideman with various big swing bands in the 1940s.
NEWS
August 24, 2005
Keter Betts, 77, a veteran jazz bassist who spent more than two decades accompanying Ella Fitzgerald and played a role in bringing the bossa nova to the United States, died Aug. 6 at his home in Silver Spring. Best known for his work with singers, Mr. Betts always said that he was more interested in providing support for other performers than in being in the spotlight; he did not record an album as a leader until he was almost 70. His association with Ms. Fitzgerald began in the mid-1960s, became full time in 1968 and continued until her retirement in 1993.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | March 31, 2009
Diana Krall [Verve Records] *** (3 STARS) On Quiet Nights, the new album by Diana Krall, the jazz singer-pianist sways with the gentle rhythms of bossa nova. It's a sound that's familiar to Krall, and she handles it well. But this is the first time the Grammy winner has devoted an entire album to the style. The CD, out Tuesday, is her first release since giving birth to twin boys two years ago. In a way, Quiet Nights extends the elegant feel of Krall's last album, the excellent From This Moment On. Her hushed, Shirley Horn-like vocals are warmly embraced by tastefully understated orchestration overseen by the legendary Claus Ogerman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and By J. D. Considine,Sun Music Critic | May 18, 2000
Bebel Gilberto Tanto Tempo (Ziriguiboom/Six Degrees 675036 1026) Bebel Gilberto was born to sing bossa nova. That sounds like hype, but her personal history bears it out. Her dad is Joao Gilberto, the singer/guitarist who helped Stan Getz launch the bossa nova craze in America, while her mother, Miucha (the sister of singer Chico Buarque), was a major star in her own right in Brazil. In that sense, Bebel is practically bossa nova royalty. Even so, she's not one merely to follow in her parents' footsteps.
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
Center Stage and a handful of area businesses will shine the spotlight on local artists ranging from bossa nova musicians to sculptors in an art party at the theater March 1. The organizers of the extravaganza, called Project One, are to unveil their plans during a news conference today. Project One will be "about raising awareness of the [Baltimore] cultural community," says Charisse Nichols, the Gen Next coordinator for Center Stage who has spent a year working on the project. "We don't know of anybody else who has an art party like this one."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 3, 1999
Guitarist Charlie Byrd, a jazz and classical musician who was instrumental in popularizing the bossa nova, died of cancer early yesterday at his home in Annapolis. He was 74.A native of Virginia, Mr. Byrd had been playing guitar since childhood. He grew up playing a steel-string guitar and, after he made his professional debut on electric guitar, switched to the classical Spanish guitar in 1950. One of the first jazz musicians to make exclusive use of the nylon string instrument, Mr. Byrd brought new techniques and color to the jazz vocabulary, and would often include selections from the classical repertoire in his nightclub performances.
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
Center Stage and a handful of area businesses will shine the spotlight on local artists ranging from bossa nova musicians to sculptors in an art party at the theater March 1. The organizers of the extravaganza, called Project One, are to unveil their plans during a news conference today. Project One will be "about raising awareness of the [Baltimore] cultural community," says Charisse Nichols, the Gen Next coordinator for Center Stage who has spent a year working on the project. "We don't know of anybody else who has an art party like this one."
NEWS
August 24, 2005
Keter Betts, 77, a veteran jazz bassist who spent more than two decades accompanying Ella Fitzgerald and played a role in bringing the bossa nova to the United States, died Aug. 6 at his home in Silver Spring. Best known for his work with singers, Mr. Betts always said that he was more interested in providing support for other performers than in being in the spotlight; he did not record an album as a leader until he was almost 70. His association with Ms. Fitzgerald began in the mid-1960s, became full time in 1968 and continued until her retirement in 1993.
FEATURES
By Heather Fuller and Heather Fuller,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 4, 2002
On the phone from New York, Nelly Furtado is cool yet not conceited, friendly without coming off as fake, and comfortable but not in a lazy sort of way. And the best part: She's real. Furtado, now 23, is hardly your typical pop star. She's managed to maintain a presence in both teen and mainstream publications since the release of her debut album, Whoa, Nelly! in late 2000. Her music is in rotation on radio stations with very different audiences. "You just have to have integrity, and then, in turn, people will respect you," she says.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 10, 2000
Set to the sighing, lilting sensuality of Tom Jobim's swaying love ballads, "Bossa Nova" is a pleasant enough little visual vacation. If its story and characters aren't exactly the stuff of great literature or cinema, filmgoers can still enjoy the lush beauty of Rio de Janeiro, the poetry of the Portuguese language and the silky magnetism of lead actor Antonio Fagundes if they don't pay too much attention to the movie's wispy premise. That premise is love, here portrayed in permutations worthy of the ditziest soap opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and By J. D. Considine,Sun Music Critic | May 18, 2000
Bebel Gilberto Tanto Tempo (Ziriguiboom/Six Degrees 675036 1026) Bebel Gilberto was born to sing bossa nova. That sounds like hype, but her personal history bears it out. Her dad is Joao Gilberto, the singer/guitarist who helped Stan Getz launch the bossa nova craze in America, while her mother, Miucha (the sister of singer Chico Buarque), was a major star in her own right in Brazil. In that sense, Bebel is practically bossa nova royalty. Even so, she's not one merely to follow in her parents' footsteps.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 3, 1999
Guitarist Charlie Byrd, a jazz and classical musician who was instrumental in popularizing the bossa nova, died of cancer early yesterday at his home in Annapolis. He was 74.A native of Virginia, Mr. Byrd had been playing guitar since childhood. He grew up playing a steel-string guitar and, after he made his professional debut on electric guitar, switched to the classical Spanish guitar in 1950. One of the first jazz musicians to make exclusive use of the nylon string instrument, Mr. Byrd brought new techniques and color to the jazz vocabulary, and would often include selections from the classical repertoire in his nightclub performances.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 11, 1995
If you subscribe to Bravo, your night of TV is all set. If not, the only program deserving of a hearty "bravo!" is tonight's freewheeling episode of "The Marshal."* "NBA All-Star Stay in School Celebration." (noon-1 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11,, BET, NIK, TNT) -- For the fifth straight year, broadcast and cable networks are providing a simultaneous special, showcasing potential role models from sports and show business, to stress -- through music, comedy and speeches -- the need for a proper education.
NEWS
October 15, 1993
The nation's capital may be just at the other end of the parkway, but most Baltimoreans are woefully uninformed about what goes on in Washington.They prefer their own city's institutions, including newspapers, radio and television. For that reason, many Baltimoreans may have never heard of Felix Grant, a Washington institution as a jazz disk jockey, who died recently at 74.To call Felix Grant the Harley of Washington -- after Baltimore jazz disk jockey Harley Brinsfield -- would be unfair to both of these men who are now spinning records at that great jazz station in the sky. Harley at his best had a good program; Felix Grant had that but also exercised great influence on popularizing previously unknown talent.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 14, 1998
Remember when the Beastie Boys were the freshest act around?Their 1986 debut, "Licensed to Ill," was not only the first rap release to top the Billboard albums chart, but it stood as proof that rock and rap were totally compatible. "Paul's Boutique," in 1989, pioneered the wry pop culture plundering Beck has built his career around and helped kick the '70s revival into gear, while 1994's "Ill Communication" presaged rap's return to a live band groove.There are also such side projects as the Beastie-sponsored Milarepa Fund, which produced the Tibetan Freedom Concerts, and the Beastie-owned Grand Royal label, which signed Sean Lennon.
NEWS
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 10, 1996
NEW YORK -- All rock stars have their kinky side, but few would ever admit to the sort of unusual interests Sting pursues.No, it's nothing to do with underage girls or Turkish geese. Sting, it seems, prefers to fool around with music, perverting pop idioms at every opportunity. For him, there's no better fun than teasing a country tune, undermining a waltz or leading a samba astray."Well, this is part of my perversion," he says with a devilish grin. "I love the idea of music forms being elastic.
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