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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- An indictment of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic is expected to be announced today by the war crimes tribunal at The Hague, diplomats said yesterday, the first time a sitting head of state will be formally charged by an international court with committing atrocities. The decision to bring an indictment will deepen Milosevic's isolation among world leaders and could throw the top ranks of Belgrade's government into disarray, Western officials said. But it also will force Western leaders to reconsider whether they can negotiate peace with an accused war criminal and rely on him to carry out an agreement.
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NEWS
By ALISSA J. RUBIN AND ZORAN CIRJAKOVIC and ALISSA J. RUBIN AND ZORAN CIRJAKOVIC,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 2006
BELGRADE, Serbia-Montenegro -- Rumors swirled late yesterday that Gen. Ratko Mladic, the fugitive Bosnian Serb commander accused of orchestrating Europe's worst massacre of civilians since World War II, had been captured and was being transferred to an international court in the Netherlands to be tried on war crimes charges. Serbian officials quickly denied the reports, and a spokesman for the court in The Hague said the panel had no information that an arrest had been made. People close to the Serbian government and Western sources indicated that intense negotiations are under way between the government and Mladic to persuade him to surrender.
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NEWS
May 21, 1993
The author of this article is a U.S. official who requested anonymity. AN extraordinary combination of circumstances makes this a propitious moment for a new effort to end the cruel war in Bosnia. It is not a time to step back, although the temptation to do so is strong.After the defiant vote of Bosnian Serb leaders to reject the Vance-Owen peace plan, and under intense pressure from economic sanctions and President Clinton's credible threat of force, President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia has suddenly stopped encouraging his allies in Bosnia.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- An indictment of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic is expected to be announced today by the war crimes tribunal at The Hague, diplomats said yesterday, the first time a sitting head of state will be formally charged by an international court with committing atrocities. The decision to bring an indictment will deepen Milosevic's isolation among world leaders and could throw the top ranks of Belgrade's government into disarray, Western officials said. But it also will force Western leaders to reconsider whether they can negotiate peace with an accused war criminal and rely on him to carry out an agreement.
FEATURES
By Jeff Kaye and Jeff Kaye,The Hollywood Reporter | August 23, 1995
In a move reminiscent of the Band Aid/"We Are the World" projects of the mid-1980s, top bands from the chart-busting British pop music scene are joining forces to record an album for Bosnia charity War Child.The album, called "Help," will feature tracks from Blur, Oasis' Noel Gallagher, Portishead, Suede, the Stone Roses and Manic Street Preachers, among others. About 20 acts are expected to participate in the project.Blur and Oasis have the top two singles in the United Kingdom, having just concluded a highly publicized chart battle that was likened to the glory days of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.
FEATURES
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
"Blood and Vengeance: One Family's Story of the War in Bosnia," by Chuck Sudetic. W.W. Norton. 400 pages. $29.95. The physical mechanisms of genocide have never been much of a mystery. Line up the unfortunates and open fire. Shove the bodies into a ditch. The Nazis industrialized the process, but the results were the same.It is the mental mechanisms that remain indecipherable, or else genocide would not keep recurring throughout the world. In "Blood and Vengeance," Chuck Sudetic comes about as close as possible to reaching the heart of the matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
"Before the Rain" is an unusual commentary on the war in the former Yugoslavia that, while intriguing, suffers from its own sense of importance.What it is trying to accomplish is indeed important, and writer-director Milcho Manchevski deserves praise for a complex approach to a crisis that is anything but simple. In a three-part, interconnected story, he evokes the pain and unfathomable hatreds of the Balkan civil war. Like impending rain, the clouds of war hang over Macedonia -- a part of the former Yugoslavia that, unlike Bosnia-Herzegovina, hasn't been consumed by centuries-old ethnic conflicts.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 31, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Tens of thousands of Bosnian Muslims, crammed into protected enclaves, depend for survival on aid convoys running a gantlet past hostile Serbs. The siege of Sarajevo now has lasted longer than Leningrad's 900 days in World War II."Ethnic cleansing," indiscriminate killing and raping go on. In the northern Bosnian areas under Serbian control, many non-Serbs who are not expelled are pulled into work gangs. "Ethnic terror continues," states a recent United Nations report.As Bosnians enter a third harsh winter of warfare, their suffering has taken on the quality of background noise, having long since lost the power to shock.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | March 8, 1993
There's just no pleasing some people. Your heart can be in the right place but they still complain.An example is President Clinton's decision to airdrop food and medical supplies for trapped Bosnian Muslims who are being ethnically cleansed by the Serbs.Can anyone deny that it's a nice thing to do? Of course not. Even those who don't number any Bosnian Muslims among their best friends think we should do it.But what do the critics say? That it is almost a complete waste of time, an empty gesture.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As the United States prepares to forge an international coalition for new military pressure in the Balkans, European allies, swallowing hard, are reconsidering previously ruled-out measures, including the arming of Bosnia's Muslims.For months, Britain and France viewed the lifting of the arms embargo on the outgunned Muslims as probably the worst of the military options being considered by the United States. They were joined by other European countries and Canada, which, like Britain and France, has has peacekeeping forces in Bosnia.
FEATURES
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
"Blood and Vengeance: One Family's Story of the War in Bosnia," by Chuck Sudetic. W.W. Norton. 400 pages. $29.95. The physical mechanisms of genocide have never been much of a mystery. Line up the unfortunates and open fire. Shove the bodies into a ditch. The Nazis industrialized the process, but the results were the same.It is the mental mechanisms that remain indecipherable, or else genocide would not keep recurring throughout the world. In "Blood and Vengeance," Chuck Sudetic comes about as close as possible to reaching the heart of the matter.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 26, 1996
BERLIN -- War crimes investigators in Bosnia might never be able to exhume bodies from the mass graves of Srebrenica unless reluctant NATO forces press for mine-clearing operations and provide more security, investigation sources say.It is a shortcoming that could weaken genocide cases against Bosnian Serb leaders Radovan Karadzic and Gen. Ratko Mladic, among others.Forensic investigators for the United Nations International War Crimes Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia had hoped to begin digging up bodies this summer at several of about a dozen sites near Srebrenica, locations where up to 8,000 Bosnian Muslims are believed to have been massacred by Bosnian Serb forces in July.
FEATURES
By Jeff Kaye and Jeff Kaye,The Hollywood Reporter | August 23, 1995
In a move reminiscent of the Band Aid/"We Are the World" projects of the mid-1980s, top bands from the chart-busting British pop music scene are joining forces to record an album for Bosnia charity War Child.The album, called "Help," will feature tracks from Blur, Oasis' Noel Gallagher, Portishead, Suede, the Stone Roses and Manic Street Preachers, among others. About 20 acts are expected to participate in the project.Blur and Oasis have the top two singles in the United Kingdom, having just concluded a highly publicized chart battle that was likened to the glory days of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
"Before the Rain" is an unusual commentary on the war in the former Yugoslavia that, while intriguing, suffers from its own sense of importance.What it is trying to accomplish is indeed important, and writer-director Milcho Manchevski deserves praise for a complex approach to a crisis that is anything but simple. In a three-part, interconnected story, he evokes the pain and unfathomable hatreds of the Balkan civil war. Like impending rain, the clouds of war hang over Macedonia -- a part of the former Yugoslavia that, unlike Bosnia-Herzegovina, hasn't been consumed by centuries-old ethnic conflicts.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN | February 12, 1995
Berlin -- If you've ever wondered why the war in Bosnia seems as if it will never end, here's a short but illuminating quiz:Question One. When did international mediators first warn the Bosnian Serbs that "time is running out" for peace negotiations?Two years and a month ago. The latest such warning came from the French during the past two weeks. For some reason the Serbs didn't take it seriously.Question Two. When did the news media report that a fierce Serbian attack was "tightening a noose around" the Muslim enclave of Bihac?
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 31, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Tens of thousands of Bosnian Muslims, crammed into protected enclaves, depend for survival on aid convoys running a gantlet past hostile Serbs. The siege of Sarajevo now has lasted longer than Leningrad's 900 days in World War II."Ethnic cleansing," indiscriminate killing and raping go on. In the northern Bosnian areas under Serbian control, many non-Serbs who are not expelled are pulled into work gangs. "Ethnic terror continues," states a recent United Nations report.As Bosnians enter a third harsh winter of warfare, their suffering has taken on the quality of background noise, having long since lost the power to shock.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN | February 12, 1995
Berlin -- If you've ever wondered why the war in Bosnia seems as if it will never end, here's a short but illuminating quiz:Question One. When did international mediators first warn the Bosnian Serbs that "time is running out" for peace negotiations?Two years and a month ago. The latest such warning came from the French during the past two weeks. For some reason the Serbs didn't take it seriously.Question Two. When did the news media report that a fierce Serbian attack was "tightening a noose around" the Muslim enclave of Bihac?
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 26, 1996
BERLIN -- War crimes investigators in Bosnia might never be able to exhume bodies from the mass graves of Srebrenica unless reluctant NATO forces press for mine-clearing operations and provide more security, investigation sources say.It is a shortcoming that could weaken genocide cases against Bosnian Serb leaders Radovan Karadzic and Gen. Ratko Mladic, among others.Forensic investigators for the United Nations International War Crimes Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia had hoped to begin digging up bodies this summer at several of about a dozen sites near Srebrenica, locations where up to 8,000 Bosnian Muslims are believed to have been massacred by Bosnian Serb forces in July.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | May 23, 1993
VITEZ, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The people who inhabit the surreal landscape of the Bosnian civil war make little connection with the anxious diplomatic machinations of Zagreb, Belgrade, Washington and Moscow.News of "safe havens" and peace plans tends to sound remote, especially after it has filtered through the propaganda prism of the various nationalist radio broadcasts.Attention shifts to the little events down the road, like the death of a 73-year-old Muslim farmer who has hanged himself from a tree next to his barn.
NEWS
May 21, 1993
The author of this article is a U.S. official who requested anonymity. AN extraordinary combination of circumstances makes this a propitious moment for a new effort to end the cruel war in Bosnia. It is not a time to step back, although the temptation to do so is strong.After the defiant vote of Bosnian Serb leaders to reject the Vance-Owen peace plan, and under intense pressure from economic sanctions and President Clinton's credible threat of force, President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia has suddenly stopped encouraging his allies in Bosnia.
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