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By Los Angeles Times | June 9, 1994
ZAGREB, Croatia -- Rebel Bosnian Serbs and the government of Bosnia-Herzegovina grudgingly agreed yesterday to a monthlong cease-fire, breathing some life into expiring hopes for an end to the most vicious conflict to rack Europe since World War II.Croatian officials and Serbian insurgents also achieved a symbolic breakthrough in their standoff over the disputed Krajina region by agreeing to launch another effort to mend the ethnic rift dividing Croatia.But...
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 25, 1996
ZAGREB, Croatia -- The Muslim-led Bosnian government has dispatched small Iranian-trained commando units to kill or capture enemies it has branded as war criminals, senior Croatian officials and Western diplomats say.The existence of these units came to light after five Bosnian Muslims, now in prison in Croatia, were arrested this month and accused of trying to assassinate a renegade Muslim leader, Fikret Abdic, who is in exile in Croatia.The four men and one woman, some of whom are formally employed by the Bosnian police in the northwest Bosnian city of Bihac, were arrested near the Croatian city of Rijeka on April 8 by Croatian police.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 3, 1996
VIENNA, Austria -- The Bosnian government has sent soldiers to Iran for training as part of an effort to revamp its military, senior Western and Bosnian government officials say.Two Bosnian officials confirmed the training, and European countries with embassies in Iran say that the number of soldiers involved was probably "a few hundred."The training, combined with the presence of 150 to 200 Iranian Revolutionary Guards in Bosnia in violation of the Balkan peace accord, is likely to anger and alarm Bosnia's Western backers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 3, 1996
VIENNA, Austria -- The Bosnian government has sent soldiers to Iran for training as part of an effort to revamp its military, senior Western and Bosnian government officials say.Two Bosnian officials confirmed the training, and European countries with embassies in Iran say that the number of soldiers involved was probably "a few hundred."The training, combined with the presence of 150 to 200 Iranian Revolutionary Guards in Bosnia in violation of the Balkan peace accord, is likely to anger and alarm Bosnia's Western backers.
NEWS
By John F. Burns and John F. Burns,New York Times News Service | August 2, 1992
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- After a military offensive that failed to break the Serbian siege lines around Sarajevo, Bosnian government troops fell back yesterday to a city plunged in gloom over the heavy costs of the abortive breakout and the narrowing options that the failure appeared to have left to the city's defenders.After 36 hours of intensive fighting on the hills to the north of the city, the battle subsided yesterday with Serbian nationalist forces still hemming the Bosnians in as they have since the siege began nearly four months ago.The Bosnian forces, fighting with light weapons against the heavy guns of the Serbs, appear to have made only modest inroads into the Serbian lines, and at a devastating cost to themselves.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 1995
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The Bosnian Serbs earned a second 72-hour reprieve from NATO bombing yesterday by pulling back heavy weapons around Sarajevo, but a continuing Bosnian army and Croat offensive in northwest Bosnia raised fears that recent tentative moves toward peace could unravel.United Nations and NATO commanders, who had stopped the bombing of Bosnian Serb positions on the condition that the Serbs withdraw most of their big guns on the heights around Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital, said that the Serbs had made "substantial progress" and that the bombing pause would be extended for another 72 hours.
NEWS
October 18, 1993
Residents of SARAJEVO were urged to stay indoors as occasional blasts shook the city. At least 10 people were killed and 57 wounded in Sarajevo over the weekend, officials said.Rival Bosnian government and Serbian leaders met at Sarajevo airport and agreed to exchange all prisoners, starting Wednesday, Bosnian radio reported. Croatian radio reported that Croatian and Bosnian Croatian leaders remained committed to tomorrow as the start of their prisoner exchange with the Muslim-led Bosnian government.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 1996
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Bosnian Serb government leaders said yesterday that an order by the military commander, Gen. Ratko Mladic, to sever ties with the NATO-led peacekeeping force until the Bosnian government released two senior officers was "invalid" and had been rescinded."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 1996
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Bowing to international pressure, Bosnia's rival factions resumed the exchange of prisoners yesterday after a week of haggling and suspicion.About 250 Bosnian Serb prisoners were released by Croatian and Bosnian government forces, the International Committee of the Red Cross announced, with most of them boarding buses at the Sarajevo airport and then being driven to Serbian-controlled territory.The Bosnian government said it intended to release all prisoners in its detention centers by today.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 24, 1993
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- A plan that would have resulted in the exchange of 6,400 detainees and prisoners of war by all three sides in the Bosnian war has in effect collapsed.New conditions on accounting for missing people that were set by the warring parties caused the plan to be delayed yesterday pending new negotiations.Andre Collomb, a senior official of the International Committee of the Red Cross, said after four hours of talks at Sarajevo airport that there had been no breakthrough in an impasse that has blocked the exchange of about 900 Serbian and Muslim prisoners.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 1996
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Bosnian Serb government leaders said yesterday that an order by the military commander, Gen. Ratko Mladic, to sever ties with the NATO-led peacekeeping force until the Bosnian government released two senior officers was "invalid" and had been rescinded."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 1996
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Bowing to international pressure, Bosnia's rival factions resumed the exchange of prisoners yesterday after a week of haggling and suspicion.About 250 Bosnian Serb prisoners were released by Croatian and Bosnian government forces, the International Committee of the Red Cross announced, with most of them boarding buses at the Sarajevo airport and then being driven to Serbian-controlled territory.The Bosnian government said it intended to release all prisoners in its detention centers by today.
NEWS
December 12, 1995
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Some 3,000 Sarajevo residents held a rally yesterday to say they could live happily alongside Serbs in nearby suburbs who are resisting a return to Bosnian government control. Also in Sarajevo, one look atthe city's ruins convinced a skeptical California congressman that U.S. soldiers are needed to keep Bosnia's peace.Serbs as well as the city's majority Muslims gathered on the city's main street in an organized counterblast to recent protests in Serb-held suburbs against the Dayton, Ohio, peace deal that hands their areas to the government.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 21, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton intervened to prevent a collapse of the Bosnian peace process yesterday after new disputes broke out over territory, U.S. officials said.The White House informed congressional leaders that if the Muslim-led Bosnian government, Serbian and Croatian delegations failed to reach an agreement, a partial deal could be announced and the talks would be recessed for a week. But a White House official said late last evening that U.S. mediators were still pressing for a comprehensive settlement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 1995
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The Bosnian Serbs earned a second 72-hour reprieve from NATO bombing yesterday by pulling back heavy weapons around Sarajevo, but a continuing Bosnian army and Croat offensive in northwest Bosnia raised fears that recent tentative moves toward peace could unravel.United Nations and NATO commanders, who had stopped the bombing of Bosnian Serb positions on the condition that the Serbs withdraw most of their big guns on the heights around Sarajevo, the Bosnian capital, said that the Serbs had made "substantial progress" and that the bombing pause would be extended for another 72 hours.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 15, 1995
PARIS -- The Bosnian Serbs have agreed to withdraw their heavy guns out of firing range of Sarajevo, ending at least temporarily NATO's two-week bombing campaign against the Serbs, allied officials announced yesterday.The agreement, signed by the Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic and military commander Gen. Ratko Mladic, gives the Serbs six days to withdraw the approximately 300 guns that have consistently bombarded Sarajevo since April 6, 1992, the officials said.In return, NATO will suspend its bombing for three days, with a promise to refrain for a further three days if convinced the Serbian guns are being moved.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 4, 1994
EDGARTOWN, Mass. -- In a new sign of division over the path to peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Russia has issued a strong private message to President Clinton warning him not to lift the arms embargo against the Bosnian government, administration officials said yesterday.Mr. Clinton said last month that he would press for a lifting of the embargo if the Bosnian Serbs had not accepted a peace settlement drafted by the Western allies and Russia by Oct. 15. The embargo bars arms shipments to all sides in the conflict, but hurts the Bosnian government most because the Bosnian Serbs are much better armed.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 18, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The Bosnian government and Bosnian Serb leaders signed an agreement yesterday easing the Serbian stranglehold on Sarajevo for the first time in 23 months.The pact would allow limited movement for people, food, and medicine across siege lines beginning Wednesday morning."This is a first, modest, and very important step," said Sergio Vieira de Mello, the U.N. military force's civil-affairs chief, after witnessing the signing by Hasan Muratovic, a Bosnian government minister, and Momcilo Krajisnik, president of the Bosnian Serbs' Parliament.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | August 31, 1995
Paris -- The humiliation of Europe in what may prove the Yugoslav end-game has yet to be fully appreciated in Europe's capitals. Reproached for their four-year failure to find a coherent and effective common policy, officials and politicians in London, Paris and Bonn still answer as if the last four years have taught them nothing.''Yes,'' they say, ''we really must have a common European foreign policy.'' If the European Union did not have a common policy before the Yugoslav war, and doesn't have one now, after four years of crisis, how can anyone think that it is going to have one in the future?
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 20, 1995
TUZLA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- In the midst of the battle for the besieged Zepa, Bosnia's warring Muslims and Serbs finally found a common enemy. It was the blue-helmeted army of the United Nations.As the city appeared to be falling to the Serbs yesterday, a Ukrainian detachment of U.N. troops remained trapped in the pincers of multiethnic belligerence.Serbian forces have long targeted U.N. forces with shellings, sniper fire and hostage-taking in the 3-year-old war, but only Sunday did the predominantly Muslim army of the Bosnian government join in.They did so by putting a gun to the head of a U.N. commander at Zepa and ordering about 70 of his men into position as "human shields" against a Serbian attack.
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