Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBosnia Herzegovina
IN THE NEWS

Bosnia Herzegovina

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Peter Slavin and Peter Slavin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 1998
MOSTAR, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The Old Bridge was narrow and less than 100 feet long; it could be crossed on foot in seconds. But when carefully plotted Croatian artillery shells sent it crashing into the Neretva River four years ago, the shock waves traveled far and wide.Stari Mos (Old Bridge in Serbo-Croatian) had stood for more than 400 years and was the most famous landmark in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Erected on the Neretva River on the outermost reaches of the Ottoman Empire, it marked the place where the Islamic East met and mingled with the Christian West.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
For Capt. Martin Noorsalu, deploying to Afghanistan with the Maryland National Guard last year was an unusual opportunity. Noorsalu is one of only a dozen helicopter pilots in the Estonian Air Force. The sole air defense service of the former Soviet republic numbers some 400 personnel. They fly four helicopters. But from September to December, Noorsalu and fellow Estonian Air Force Capt. Rene Kallis flew medical evacuation missions in Afghanistan with Maryland National Guard members in the 1st General Support Aviation Battalion of the 169th Aviation Regiment.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 21, 1992
The invasion of Bosnia-Herzegovina by the Yugoslav federal army and Serbian irregulars is an international aggression and a human rights abuse. Coming after U.S. and European recognition of Bosnia-Herzegovina's sovereign independence and after the torturous world efforts to end the similar fighting in Croatia, this invasion affronts the United Nations, Europe and all who wish Yugoslavian peoples well.Bosnia-Herzegovina is Yugoslavia writ small. Its 4.4 million people include no ethnic majority, only rival minorities.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 2001
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina - This small town, with its pocket-size Orthodox church and tatty cafes, is Karadzic country: a place where indicted war crimes suspect Radovan Karadzic has long been viewed as a native son, a savior, a saint. But even here, where the Bosnian Serb leader lived at the height of his power during his country's brutal war, there is a weariness when people talk about Karadzic - as if they love him but are almost too tired to defend him. That matters, because Pale is a place where people generally see the 1992-1995 war through an exclusively Serbian lens, one in which the Serbs are the biggest victims and not the perpetrators of "ethnic cleansing" against Bosnia's Muslims.
NEWS
July 30, 1993
Peace mediators in GENEVA for Bosnia-Herzegovina try to reconcile Serb-Croat demands for an ethnic division and the Muslim-led government's wish for a single state. Serbian gunners ignored a cease-fire worked out by their leaders in Geneva and pounded positions on strategic Mount Zuc overlooking SARAJEVO. The shelling declined later.In WASHINGTON, the United States and France agreed with United Nations leaders that no more attacks on U.N. forces in the former Yugoslavia should be tolerated without retaliation, the French defense minister said.
NEWS
April 3, 1993
The decision of NATO to enforce the United Nations ban on flying over zones of Bosnia-Herzegovina is a major venture by the 16-member alliance outside its original purpose. This is a first effort at dealing with Europe's most dangerous problems other than the vanished Soviet threat.The new policy is military. NATO warplanes will escort planes that violate the ban, order them to land and, if disregarded, shoot at them.Since most of the violations are Serbian, the United States, British, French and Dutch planes that will initially take part -- commanded by an Italian general -- risk engagement with Serbian forces.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1992
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- In the months since Serbian forces began seizing huge swaths of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the territory under their control has become a patchwork of rival Serbian fiefs consumed by lawlessness and economic collapse.Stark images of violence and near-anarchy can be seen throughout this new self-declared country, which calls itself the Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and covers roughly two-thirds of what was once one of the republics of Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | January 21, 1993
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Bosnian Serb leaders accepted the Geneva peace plan yesterday, opening prospects for an end to hostilities that have ravaged the former Yugoslav republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina for eight months.The Bosnian Serb legislature was acting under the threat of outside military intervention and heavy pressure from Belgrade by Serbian strongman Slobodan Milosevic.The vote in a closed-door session was 55-15, with one abstention, according to Health Minister Dragan Kalinic.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 2000
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Four years after Bosnia's war, weekend elections showed how deep the ethnic divide in this country remains, as Muslim voters shifted toward moderate leaders while Serbs and Croats stayed with old-style nationalists. Although official preliminary results in the vote for municipal councils were not expected until today, the contending parties' estimates of their showings yesterday were being regarded as reliable. In the past, such assertions have generally proved accurate.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 2, 1996
MEMICI, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The cozy, container-like soldiers' quarters shipped recently to U.S. troops in Bosnia have not yet made it to this shot-up corner of the former Yugoslav federation.The men here still live eight to a tent, with chilly mud sometimes seeping up through the plywood floor and kerosene heaters roaring night and day.There is no telephone line here yet, and shower privileges still come but once a fortnight. Lunch still comes each day in a plain brown plastic pouch, but at least breakfast is improving: It arrives fresh each morning now aboard an M-106 mortar carrier that rumbles in from a camp where there is a proper mess.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 2000
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Four years after Bosnia's war, weekend elections showed how deep the ethnic divide in this country remains, as Muslim voters shifted toward moderate leaders while Serbs and Croats stayed with old-style nationalists. Although official preliminary results in the vote for municipal councils were not expected until today, the contending parties' estimates of their showings yesterday were being regarded as reliable. In the past, such assertions have generally proved accurate.
NEWS
By James Drake and James Drake,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 1998
CAPLJINA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Ask Tomislav Pervan how he enjoys his job and he refers to his work manual, the Bible. "Christ said, 'Blessed are the peacemakers,' " he grins ruefully. "I hope he still thinks that when I eventually meet him, because no one else around here seems to agree."As the head of the Franciscan order of monks in western Herzegovina -- an area of Bosnia that saw some of the worst "ethnic cleansing" of the Yugoslav conflict -- Pervan knows more about the horrors of war than most.
NEWS
By Peter Slavin and Peter Slavin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 1998
MOSTAR, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The Old Bridge was narrow and less than 100 feet long; it could be crossed on foot in seconds. But when carefully plotted Croatian artillery shells sent it crashing into the Neretva River four years ago, the shock waves traveled far and wide.Stari Mos (Old Bridge in Serbo-Croatian) had stood for more than 400 years and was the most famous landmark in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Erected on the Neretva River on the outermost reaches of the Ottoman Empire, it marked the place where the Islamic East met and mingled with the Christian West.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 4, 1998
OLOVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Staff Sgt. Paul Correale noticed the elderly woman in black with the toddler when the two turned to watch his patrol from 50 feet or so away. The child waved a tiny, pink-mittened hand in greeting.The sergeant, 34, is a specialist in armed reconnaissance who describes what his training entailed this way: "They tell us to go out and get information on the enemy so the main force can kill them."And that is what he is expected to do in Bosnia if the NATO-led peacekeeping mission deteriorates into combat.
NEWS
By Gillian Sandford and Gillian Sandford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1996
FOCA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Even by the not terribly high standards of Bosnia, the town called Foca is a grim, unlovely place. It huddles close to the Drina River in southeastern Bosnia like a scrap yard of ruined concrete alongside a maltreated creek.Foca is Bosnian Serb territory, and in the past 50 years it has been the site of two massacres that have an unsettling symmetry. In 1942, a force of Serbs overran a mainly Muslim militia that was the murderous puppet of the Nazi occupation forces, and once the militia was slaughtered, the Serbs moved on to kill thousands of Muslim civilians.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 1996
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Conceding that "widespread abuse" has damaged the run-up to Bosnia's first postwar election, the U.S. diplomat in charge of the vote called off municipal balloting yesterday and raised the possibility of an extended stay for NATO peacekeeping troops.Bosnian Serb leaders, who were most keen on elections and who were accused of the most egregious abuses, blasted the delay as a "shameful act" and vowed to hold their own municipal contests.Ambassador Robert Frowick, who heads the international mission charged with supervising the elections, ordered postponement of voting in 109 municipalities in response to efforts by the Bosnian Serbs to create Serb majorities fraudulently in cities they seized during the war and emptied of Muslims through massacre and intimidation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 1996
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Western election monitors said yesterday that they are likely to take action to correct what they call "massive" manipulation of the rules for next month's elections, especially the evidence that Bosnian Serb refugees now living in Serbia have taken advantage of loopholes in the voter registration rules to register in great numbers in a few important towns that formerly had Muslim majorities.But the monitors, from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, remained undecided about how to counter this and other threats to the integrity of the Sept.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | October 1, 1992
Belgrade. -- There are two ways out of the war in what was Yugoslavia -- other than by the total exhaustion, or murder in detail, of all involved.The first is that the international community's confused and improvised intervention becomes a substantial obstacle to the war's prosecution. Already so many foreigners and foreign agencies are in so many places, interfering so widely and obstructively in what is going on, that they have put some political and geographical limits on the killing and ethnic purges.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 1996
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Western election monitors said yesterday that they are likely to take action to correct what they call "massive" manipulation of the rules for next month's elections, especially the evidence that Bosnian Serb refugees now living in Serbia have taken advantage of loopholes in the voter registration rules to register in great numbers in a few important towns that formerly had Muslim majorities.But the monitors, from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, remained undecided about how to counter this and other threats to the integrity of the Sept.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 29, 1996
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- We went fishing in Bosnia the other day.Nothing was biting but the police.I guess I should explain. I was traveling with colleague Tom Hundley of the Chicago Tribune on a warm and sunny Sunday evening in Banja Luka, the heart of Bosnian Serb territory. With no interviews on the horizon until Monday morning, we decided to head south, to the steep green gorge of the Vrbas River. With its sheer rock faces and rolling white rapids, it's as inviting as any stretch of trout water in the southern Appalachians.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.