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NEWS
By Peter Slavin and Peter Slavin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 1998
MOSTAR, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The Old Bridge was narrow and less than 100 feet long; it could be crossed on foot in seconds. But when carefully plotted Croatian artillery shells sent it crashing into the Neretva River four years ago, the shock waves traveled far and wide.Stari Mos (Old Bridge in Serbo-Croatian) had stood for more than 400 years and was the most famous landmark in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Erected on the Neretva River on the outermost reaches of the Ottoman Empire, it marked the place where the Islamic East met and mingled with the Christian West.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: Nobody needs me to remind them life is unfair, but the fact that we are judged as people on the same scale as Andrea Pirlo is terribly unfortunate for us all. What's on tap: Switzerland vs. Ecuador, 12 p.m., ABC; France vs. Honduras, 3 p.m.; ABC; Argentina vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina, 6 p.m., ESPN. What you'll see: On the eve of the United States' first game, it's important to note that CONCACAF is 2-0 with a pair of big wins so far in the tournament.
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NEWS
August 19, 2001
More than 40 soldiers from a Maryland National Guard unit in Annapolis are scheduled to leave today for New Jersey to prepare for a peacekeeping mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Guard officials said. The six-month deployment marks the first time the entire Troop A 1-115th Calvary Forward unit has been called into service. Individual members served in Operation Desert Storm and Bosnia with other units, officials said. The unit will leave for Europe from Fort Dix, N.J., in about two weeks.
NEWS
August 19, 2001
More than 40 soldiers from a Maryland National Guard unit in Annapolis are scheduled to leave today for New Jersey to prepare for a peacekeeping mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Guard officials said. The six-month deployment marks the first time the entire Troop A 1-115th Calvary Forward unit has been called into service. Individual members served in Operation Desert Storm and Bosnia with other units, officials said. The unit will leave for Europe from Fort Dix, N.J., in about two weeks.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1992
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- In the months since Serbian forces began seizing huge swaths of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the territory under their control has become a patchwork of rival Serbian fiefs consumed by lawlessness and economic collapse.Stark images of violence and near-anarchy can be seen throughout this new self-declared country, which calls itself the Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and covers roughly two-thirds of what was once one of the republics of Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | July 26, 1991
SARAJEVO, Yugoslavia -- Leaders of Yugoslavia's large Muslim community have made a dramatic shift in their policy, suddenly distancing themselves from Croatia's President Franjo Tudjman and offering what they said was a "historic agreement" to their traditional enemy -- the Serbs.The offer was made last week at a meeting between Muslim and Serb politicians in the republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Officials from the republic then flew to Belgrade to propose the plan personally to Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: Nobody needs me to remind them life is unfair, but the fact that we are judged as people on the same scale as Andrea Pirlo is terribly unfortunate for us all. What's on tap: Switzerland vs. Ecuador, 12 p.m., ABC; France vs. Honduras, 3 p.m.; ABC; Argentina vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina, 6 p.m., ESPN. What you'll see: On the eve of the United States' first game, it's important to note that CONCACAF is 2-0 with a pair of big wins so far in the tournament.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 13, 1993
GENEVA -- Hours after he seemed to have torpedoed an international plan for peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the leader of Bosnia's ethnic Serbs reversed himself last night and said he accepted the proposed accord.Much work needs to be done before any agreement is completed, and many previous accords have unraveled.But the mediators viewed the endorsement by the Bosnian Serbs' leader, Dr. Radovan Karadzic, as a critically important step.Dr. Karadzic told reporters last night that he needed "a few days" to gain approval of the plan from the Parliament of the self-declared Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, but that he was sure that, "We are going to approve it in our assembly."
NEWS
By ROBERT M. HAYDEN | February 7, 1993
The plan for the future of Bosnia and Herzegovina that Cyrus Vance has asked the United Nations Security Council to force upon the warring sides has been widely criticized. At first glace, it does seem to be inconsistent to the point of incoherence.On the one hand, the plan is based on the vigorous assertion that Bosnia will continue to be one state, formed of three constituent peoples (ethnic Serbs, ethnic Croats and Bosnian Muslims); everyone condemns ethnic cleansing and says that all who have been displaced must be permitted to return home; and human rights and democracy are to be guaranteed for all. A constitutional framework for a decentralized state seems to provide mechanisms for achieving this happy result.
NEWS
By ROBERT M. HAYDEN | May 2, 1993
Aleading member of the Democratic opposition in Serbia more troubled than any Western leader could be by the lack of good options for ending the war in Bosnia, recently remarked sadly that "the West doesn't realize that when you take the wrong train, every station you reach is the wrong one."the United Nations tightens sanctions on Serbia and as the calls increase for "limited" air strikes against the Serbs in Bosnia, the time has come to rethink the basic errors of American policy toward this part of the former Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By Peter Slavin and Peter Slavin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 1998
MOSTAR, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The Old Bridge was narrow and less than 100 feet long; it could be crossed on foot in seconds. But when carefully plotted Croatian artillery shells sent it crashing into the Neretva River four years ago, the shock waves traveled far and wide.Stari Mos (Old Bridge in Serbo-Croatian) had stood for more than 400 years and was the most famous landmark in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Erected on the Neretva River on the outermost reaches of the Ottoman Empire, it marked the place where the Islamic East met and mingled with the Christian West.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- With an ease that would have been impossible a few years ago, President Clinton is laying the groundwork for keeping a substantial number of American troops in Bosnia and Herzegovina well beyond his declared pullout date of June. The White House insists that Clinton has reached no final decision to keep a force in Bosnia, let alone how many troops it would contain, what its purpose would be or how long it would stay.But administration aides are making the case that keeping an international force in Bosnia beyond June is essential to preserving the progress achieved in the two years since the 1995 Dayton peace accords.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 7, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina -- The snow came late this winter to Mount Jahorina, just as it did a decade ago. And if it weren't for the Serbian trenches and gun emplacements on the slopes, it might still be a fine place for world-class skiing.At the Zetra ice rink, where in 1984 a smiling Katarina Witt glided to a gold medal, there is no more skating. The barrel of a United Nations tank pokes from the main entrance. Mortar shells have wrecked the roof. The floor where admiring spectators tossed roses onto the ice is stained with blood from the building's days as a morgue.
NEWS
By Craig R. Whitney and Craig R. Whitney,New York Times News Service | May 26, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Serbian leaders told a Russian mediator yesterday that they were not prepared to accept international monitors on their border with Bosnia and Herzegovina to verify assertions that they were not supplying Bosnian Serb forces with weapons or other military supplies.President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia, who a month ago said international observers would be welcome to confirm that his government was enforcing an embargo on military aid to Bosnian Serbs, told Vitaly I. Churkin, the Russian deputy foreign minister, that there was now "no need" for them.
NEWS
By ROBERT M. HAYDEN | May 2, 1993
Aleading member of the Democratic opposition in Serbia more troubled than any Western leader could be by the lack of good options for ending the war in Bosnia, recently remarked sadly that "the West doesn't realize that when you take the wrong train, every station you reach is the wrong one."the United Nations tightens sanctions on Serbia and as the calls increase for "limited" air strikes against the Serbs in Bosnia, the time has come to rethink the basic errors of American policy toward this part of the former Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By ROBERT M. HAYDEN | February 7, 1993
The plan for the future of Bosnia and Herzegovina that Cyrus Vance has asked the United Nations Security Council to force upon the warring sides has been widely criticized. At first glace, it does seem to be inconsistent to the point of incoherence.On the one hand, the plan is based on the vigorous assertion that Bosnia will continue to be one state, formed of three constituent peoples (ethnic Serbs, ethnic Croats and Bosnian Muslims); everyone condemns ethnic cleansing and says that all who have been displaced must be permitted to return home; and human rights and democracy are to be guaranteed for all. A constitutional framework for a decentralized state seems to provide mechanisms for achieving this happy result.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 7, 1994
SARAJEVO, Bosnia and Herzegovina -- The snow came late this winter to Mount Jahorina, just as it did a decade ago. And if it weren't for the Serbian trenches and gun emplacements on the slopes, it might still be a fine place for world-class skiing.At the Zetra ice rink, where in 1984 a smiling Katarina Witt glided to a gold medal, there is no more skating. The barrel of a United Nations tank pokes from the main entrance. Mortar shells have wrecked the roof. The floor where admiring spectators tossed roses onto the ice is stained with blood from the building's days as a morgue.
NEWS
By Craig R. Whitney and Craig R. Whitney,New York Times News Service | May 26, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Serbian leaders told a Russian mediator yesterday that they were not prepared to accept international monitors on their border with Bosnia and Herzegovina to verify assertions that they were not supplying Bosnian Serb forces with weapons or other military supplies.President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia, who a month ago said international observers would be welcome to confirm that his government was enforcing an embargo on military aid to Bosnian Serbs, told Vitaly I. Churkin, the Russian deputy foreign minister, that there was now "no need" for them.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 13, 1993
GENEVA -- Hours after he seemed to have torpedoed an international plan for peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the leader of Bosnia's ethnic Serbs reversed himself last night and said he accepted the proposed accord.Much work needs to be done before any agreement is completed, and many previous accords have unraveled.But the mediators viewed the endorsement by the Bosnian Serbs' leader, Dr. Radovan Karadzic, as a critically important step.Dr. Karadzic told reporters last night that he needed "a few days" to gain approval of the plan from the Parliament of the self-declared Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, but that he was sure that, "We are going to approve it in our assembly."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1992
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- In the months since Serbian forces began seizing huge swaths of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the territory under their control has become a patchwork of rival Serbian fiefs consumed by lawlessness and economic collapse.Stark images of violence and near-anarchy can be seen throughout this new self-declared country, which calls itself the Serbian Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and covers roughly two-thirds of what was once one of the republics of Yugoslavia.
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