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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
Leave it to Seattle Mariners reliever Norm Charlton to put yesterday's brawl at Camden Yards into perspective.When asked if he had seen a wilder fracas than the 20-minute one that erupted in the seventh inning yesterday between the Mariners and the Orioles, Charlton smiled slyly and said, "I was a [Cincinnati] Red."Although Charlton, the former Nasty Boy bullpen ace, could smile about the incident -- which led to the ejection of three Orioles and five Mariners, including manager Lou Piniella -- for Chris Bosio, the brawl was no laughing matter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
Riccardo Bosio opened Sotto Sopra in 1996, taking over the downtown space that had been ravishingly renovated for a short-lived beauty named the Vanguard Cafe. The space is still a dream, and you can see why those opera evenings Sotto Sopra produces have become so successful. With its crimson curtains, vibrant murals and ornate furnishings, its theatricality is enveloping. But it's very warm and comfortable here; keen attention to lighting and music has much to do with that. Over the years, Bosio brought in to run his kitchen a series of chefs, some of them from his native Milan, and usually for only a year at a stretch.
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SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1994
With ice bags strapped to his knees, Seattle starter Chris Bosio found a cool, quiet spot just in front of manager Lou Piniella's office after last night's 9-3 loss to the Orioles.Bosio's postgame calm was an interesting counterpoint to the fire he had shown about an hour before in the seventh, when he nearly went toe-to-toe with second-base umpire Joe Brinkman and had to be restrained by teammate Ken Griffey."[Brinkman] was talking about Chinese food, basically," cracked Bosio. "I don't want to go into it more than that.
NEWS
By Ishita Singh and Ishita Singh,Sun reporter | July 30, 2008
A simple dish of spinach lasagna sent Daniela Useli on a journey many home cooks dream of - from preparing meals just for family and friends to planning a weekly menu that bears her name at a popular restaurant. Thanks to a friend who raved about her delicately balanced lasagna to the owner of Sotto Sopra in Mount Vernon, Useli now headlines a weekly four-course menu there of foods from her roots on the island of Sardinia, called Dinner With Daniela. "Italians expect a certain flavor from their lasagna," said Alberto Conti, manager of the Community Missions office at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, who introduced Useli to Riccardo Bosio, the owner of Sotto Sopra, after sampling her vegetable dish.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | May 2, 1994
It was St. Louis manager Joe Torre who, perhaps inadvertently, provided yet another clue as to why baseball games are taking an interminable amount of time to complete.At the time, Torre was discussing the pitching knowledge of ex-Orioles right-hander Rick Sutcliffe. "He doesn't throw a lot of strikes, but good pitchers don't throw strikes unless they have to," said Torre.What the Cardinals manager really was saying, in a politically correct way, was that veteran pitchers, having lost their best stuff, devise ways to let hitters get themselves out. Only the extremely crafty can survive using this tactic.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | September 20, 1992
MILWAUKEE -- Not knowing where his next 3 or 4 million dollars is coming from hasn't had an adverse effect on Chris Bosio.The robust right-hander, who set a club record with his ninth straight win and tied a career-high with his 15th win yesterday, doesn't know where he's going to pitch next year. The Brewers have all but counted themselves out of the picture, but in the meantime they're satisfied to reap the benefits."We're too far apart, I don't see how we could get it done," said general manager Sal Bando, who rejected a four-year proposal for almost $16 million from Bosio's agent (Doug Gilbert)
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | February 28, 2007
Maybe three times proves a charm. You've got to think that must be what Riccardo Bosio is hoping for his new restaurant, Pazza Luna. He and partners chef Gianfranco Fracassetti and manager Joe NoCon are the third set of owners for the Italian spot in Locust Point. Longtime Pazza Luna owner Kim Acton sold the place in 2005. Then the new owners shut the doors last summer. You may recognize Bosio's name. He also owns the upscale Italian eatery Sotto Sopra in Mount Vernon. But don't assume Pazza Luna will be another version of the same.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck pTC and Peter Schmuck pTC,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 18, 1991
MILWAUKEE -- Baltimore Orioles right-hander Ben McDonald pitched without pain in a five-inning appearance against rookie-league competition yesterday in Sarasota, Fla., but manager Frank Robinson is not yet ready to put him back in the starting rotation.There has been speculation that McDonald will start Monday's game at the new Comiskey Park, but he might start his 1991 season with an appearance out of the bullpen."He's coming back," Robinson said, "but I don't know if he'll pitch up here on Monday.
SPORTS
August 13, 1991
Hank Majeski, who had a career average of .279 in 13 major-league seasons, has died at the age of 74. Majeski, who played 16 games (7-for-41, .171) for the Baltimore Orioles in 1955, died at his Staten Island, N.Y., home Friday after battling cancer for a year.Majeski broke into the major leagues with the Boston Braves in 1939, and also played for the New York Yankees, Philadelphia Athletics, Chicago White Sox and Cleveland Indians. He retired after the 1955 season.His best season came in 1948, batting .310 with 12 homers, 120 RBI and 183 hits.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | June 8, 1993
When coach Davey Lopes walked into the Orioles clubhouse yesterday, he addressed pitcher Alan Mills in a tone approaching reverence."What's up, Cassius?" Lopes said, referring to Cassius Clay, the legendary former heavyweight champion who changed his name in mid-career to Muhammad Ali.Indeed, Mills got in his share of punches during Sunday's 20-minute brawl, which led to the ejection of Mills and two other Orioles and five Seattle Mariners, including manager Lou Piniella."Seemed like every time I dove into a pile to get a white jersey out, it was Mills," said Orioles pitcher Rick Sutcliffe.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | May 2, 2007
Now that local produce, meats and cheeses are all the rage at upscale eateries, restaurateur Riccardo Bosio has decided to fly in an ingredient of another sort: The Chef. At Bosio's invitation, Chef Stefano Azzi is schlepping all the way from Siena, Italy, to Baltimore to make dinner. Granted, it will be quite a meal. It leads off with wine-braised pheasant, pears cooked in Chianti, and chicken liver pate cooked in Vin Santo. Then it's on to octopus salad and sauteed squid. Then vegetable soup.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | February 28, 2007
Maybe three times proves a charm. You've got to think that must be what Riccardo Bosio is hoping for his new restaurant, Pazza Luna. He and partners chef Gianfranco Fracassetti and manager Joe NoCon are the third set of owners for the Italian spot in Locust Point. Longtime Pazza Luna owner Kim Acton sold the place in 2005. Then the new owners shut the doors last summer. You may recognize Bosio's name. He also owns the upscale Italian eatery Sotto Sopra in Mount Vernon. But don't assume Pazza Luna will be another version of the same.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | September 25, 2005
It's hard to buy Ed Norris dinner in this town. Six months in the slammer would hardly kill a guy's appetite for fine dining, so that's not the problem. Fresh from federal prison, his job options limited but his tragically hip palate intact, Norris is all champagne tastes, bread-and-water budget. "I'm broke," Norris says with cheerful bravado when he accepts my recent invitation for an over-dinner interview. Norris suggests a few restaurants, including Sotto Sopra, the chic Charles Street eatery whose Italian name roughly translates to "You spent HOW MUCH on duck ravioli?"
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1995
CLEVELAND -- Cats and left-handed pitchers have nine lives, and Paul Assenmacher had gone through most of his lives when the Indians signed him this year less than three weeks before Opening Day. But if this is life No. 9 for the 34-year-old reliever, then he made the most of it in Game 5 of the AL playoffs last night.Seattle had the potential tying run on third in the seventh inning, and Assenmacher ended the threat by striking out Ken Griffey and Jay Buhner, the most important sequence in this series to date.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1994
With ice bags strapped to his knees, Seattle starter Chris Bosio found a cool, quiet spot just in front of manager Lou Piniella's office after last night's 9-3 loss to the Orioles.Bosio's postgame calm was an interesting counterpoint to the fire he had shown about an hour before in the seventh, when he nearly went toe-to-toe with second-base umpire Joe Brinkman and had to be restrained by teammate Ken Griffey."[Brinkman] was talking about Chinese food, basically," cracked Bosio. "I don't want to go into it more than that.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | May 2, 1994
It was St. Louis manager Joe Torre who, perhaps inadvertently, provided yet another clue as to why baseball games are taking an interminable amount of time to complete.At the time, Torre was discussing the pitching knowledge of ex-Orioles right-hander Rick Sutcliffe. "He doesn't throw a lot of strikes, but good pitchers don't throw strikes unless they have to," said Torre.What the Cardinals manager really was saying, in a politically correct way, was that veteran pitchers, having lost their best stuff, devise ways to let hitters get themselves out. Only the extremely crafty can survive using this tactic.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | May 2, 2007
Now that local produce, meats and cheeses are all the rage at upscale eateries, restaurateur Riccardo Bosio has decided to fly in an ingredient of another sort: The Chef. At Bosio's invitation, Chef Stefano Azzi is schlepping all the way from Siena, Italy, to Baltimore to make dinner. Granted, it will be quite a meal. It leads off with wine-braised pheasant, pears cooked in Chianti, and chicken liver pate cooked in Vin Santo. Then it's on to octopus salad and sauteed squid. Then vegetable soup.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
On the day that the Orioles won their season-high fourth straight game, the feat was virtually ignored, overshadowed by perhaps the biggest baseball brawl in the club's 40-year history.The seventh-inning rumble that interrupted the 5-2 win over the Seattle Mariners for 20 minutes resulted in the ejection of seven players plus Mariners manager Lou Piniella. It also gave the Orioles their biggest scare of the season when starting pitcher Mike Mussina was buried under a pile of players on the mound after hitting Bill Haselman on the shoulder with a high, inside fastball.
SPORTS
By JIM HENNEMAN | June 13, 1993
Now that the fines have been levied, the suspension imposed, and the obligatory appeals filed, it's time to take a long, hopefully final, look at what transpired between the Orioles and Seattle Mariners a week ago.The hockey game that broke out at Camden Yards was more than the worst brawl in the 40-year history of the Orioles. Those who thought it was the highlight of the week or a needed diversion for a team that had been in a trance are advised to rethink their position.It was one of the scariest scenes in club history, and emphasized once again that such altercations are stupid.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | June 8, 1993
When coach Davey Lopes walked into the Orioles clubhouse yesterday, he addressed pitcher Alan Mills in a tone approaching reverence."What's up, Cassius?" Lopes said, referring to Cassius Clay, the legendary former heavyweight champion who changed his name in mid-career to Muhammad Ali.Indeed, Mills got in his share of punches during Sunday's 20-minute brawl, which led to the ejection of Mills and two other Orioles and five Seattle Mariners, including manager Lou Piniella."Seemed like every time I dove into a pile to get a white jersey out, it was Mills," said Orioles pitcher Rick Sutcliffe.
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