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By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 1997
FALLSBURG, N.Y. -- It is 1963, and a naive 17-year-old girl from New York City vacations with her family at a majestic resort with a private airfield. She meets a dance instructor. They fall in love.The story is the plot line from the 1987 movie "Dirty Dancing," but the setting is real. Grossinger's, the resort where the movie was filmed, was real. The boomtown feel of this Catskills hamlet was real. And the neighboring Concord Hotel was real: all 2,800 rooms, two bathrooms to a suite, with a swimming pool the size of a lake.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | July 24, 2007
How you feel about Menopause: the Musical likely will depend on your response to the Chitlin Circuit and the Borscht Belt. Elite America snootily likes to pretend that the theat-uh it patronizes has nothing whatsoever in common with the declasse offerings of the Chitlin Circuit (known alternately as African-American "urban theater") or the Borscht Belt that gave a jump-start to the careers of such Jewish entertainers as Mel Brooks and Buddy Hackett. If you go Menopause: the Musical is being performed in the M&T Bank Pavilion of the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, 12 N. Eutaw St., through at least Sept.
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NEWS
By Josh Getlin and Josh Getlin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2000
MONTICELLO, N.Y. -- As bulldozers get ready to demolish what's left of the old Borscht Belt and create a new mecca of swank hotels and casinos, a bitter truth is emerging: The world of wisecracking comedians, teeming bungalow colonies and summer romance immortalized in such films as "Dirty Dancing" is gone, the victim of changing vacation tastes and poor management. By design, it is being replaced with a homogenized vacationland that will marginalize, if not erase, the Jewish culture preceding it. And the change is difficult for some to accept, given the Catskill Mountains' rich historical legacy.
NEWS
By Terence Neilan and Terence Neilan,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2001
LIVINGSTON MANOR, N.Y. - Until six years ago, James Frechter rose at 9 each morning, put on a dark suit and the mandatory tie and took the subway to Wall Street to begin another long day as an associate lawyer with Stroock & Stroock & Lavan. Nowadays, he is up by 4 a.m. in the Dai Bosatsu Zendo, an hour before a young monk wakes the rest of the monastery by walking through the corridors clanging a hand bell. Frechter, now a monk who answers to the name Kigen, has by that time already donned a kimono and a thin set of robes and headed to a hall in the predawn darkness to lead fellow monks and visitors in zazen, or sitting meditation.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | July 24, 2007
How you feel about Menopause: the Musical likely will depend on your response to the Chitlin Circuit and the Borscht Belt. Elite America snootily likes to pretend that the theat-uh it patronizes has nothing whatsoever in common with the declasse offerings of the Chitlin Circuit (known alternately as African-American "urban theater") or the Borscht Belt that gave a jump-start to the careers of such Jewish entertainers as Mel Brooks and Buddy Hackett. If you go Menopause: the Musical is being performed in the M&T Bank Pavilion of the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, 12 N. Eutaw St., through at least Sept.
NEWS
By Charles V. Bagli and Charles V. Bagli,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2000
In the first major project since the bungalow colonies and hotels in New York state's borscht belt fell on hard times 30 years ago, a developer plans to demolish the legendary Concord Hotel in the Catskills and build a $500 million resort, with a hotel and conference center, golf village, spa ranch, entertainment center and wilderness area. Louis R. Cappelli, a Westchester County developer who bought the Concord property on Kiamesha Lake a year ago, said he planned to begin construction by Labor Day on property of more than 1,600 acres -- twice the size of Central Park.
NEWS
By Terence Neilan and Terence Neilan,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2001
LIVINGSTON MANOR, N.Y. - Until six years ago, James Frechter rose at 9 each morning, put on a dark suit and the mandatory tie and took the subway to Wall Street to begin another long day as an associate lawyer with Stroock & Stroock & Lavan. Nowadays, he is up by 4 a.m. in the Dai Bosatsu Zendo, an hour before a young monk wakes the rest of the monastery by walking through the corridors clanging a hand bell. Frechter, now a monk who answers to the name Kigen, has by that time already donned a kimono and a thin set of robes and headed to a hall in the predawn darkness to lead fellow monks and visitors in zazen, or sitting meditation.
NEWS
By David M. Shribman | May 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Five million dollars for a law-enforcement academy in New Mexico. More than a million for a manure-handling project in Mississippi. Another million for peanut research in Georgia. Three-quarters of a million for grasshopper research in Alaska. "Pork" is no longer a four-letter word in Washington.Indeed, the other white meat is on the menu again just about everywhere in the capital. In the past year, the budget surplus has made the political world safe for pork again, and much of the budget anguish that was a staple of the big-deficit years has evaporated.
FEATURES
By Barbara Shea and Barbara Shea,NEWSDAY | November 24, 1996
It's nighttime in the Catskills resort area in New York, and the jokes are flying."Jewish guy walks into a bar ""Italian guy walks into a bar "Equal-opportunity insults -- badda bing, badda boom.After all, there's nothing like a good zinger at your expense to make you feel you really belong. And if a punch line sometimes falls flat in these politically correct times, well, maybe you should forgive the comedian the way you do foolish Uncle Marty after he's had a few drinks. Because here in the mountains, everyone is family.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 4, 1993
Judging from "Catskills on Broadway," the four-member comedy revue now at the Lyric Opera House, it seems safe to say you can take the comic out of the Catskills, but you can't take the Catskills out of the comic.Food is a major activity at the hotels in the Catskills, explains Mal Z. Lawrence, the comic who comes on last and earns some of the biggest laughs. "People eat so much food up there, they have developed a new disease -- Anorexia Ponderosa."Food is an ideal metaphor to describe the appeal of this show, which appears to be something of an acquired taste -- like gefilte fish.
NEWS
By Josh Getlin and Josh Getlin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2000
MONTICELLO, N.Y. -- As bulldozers get ready to demolish what's left of the old Borscht Belt and create a new mecca of swank hotels and casinos, a bitter truth is emerging: The world of wisecracking comedians, teeming bungalow colonies and summer romance immortalized in such films as "Dirty Dancing" is gone, the victim of changing vacation tastes and poor management. By design, it is being replaced with a homogenized vacationland that will marginalize, if not erase, the Jewish culture preceding it. And the change is difficult for some to accept, given the Catskill Mountains' rich historical legacy.
NEWS
By Charles V. Bagli and Charles V. Bagli,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2000
In the first major project since the bungalow colonies and hotels in New York state's borscht belt fell on hard times 30 years ago, a developer plans to demolish the legendary Concord Hotel in the Catskills and build a $500 million resort, with a hotel and conference center, golf village, spa ranch, entertainment center and wilderness area. Louis R. Cappelli, a Westchester County developer who bought the Concord property on Kiamesha Lake a year ago, said he planned to begin construction by Labor Day on property of more than 1,600 acres -- twice the size of Central Park.
NEWS
By David M. Shribman | May 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Five million dollars for a law-enforcement academy in New Mexico. More than a million for a manure-handling project in Mississippi. Another million for peanut research in Georgia. Three-quarters of a million for grasshopper research in Alaska. "Pork" is no longer a four-letter word in Washington.Indeed, the other white meat is on the menu again just about everywhere in the capital. In the past year, the budget surplus has made the political world safe for pork again, and much of the budget anguish that was a staple of the big-deficit years has evaporated.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 1997
FALLSBURG, N.Y. -- It is 1963, and a naive 17-year-old girl from New York City vacations with her family at a majestic resort with a private airfield. She meets a dance instructor. They fall in love.The story is the plot line from the 1987 movie "Dirty Dancing," but the setting is real. Grossinger's, the resort where the movie was filmed, was real. The boomtown feel of this Catskills hamlet was real. And the neighboring Concord Hotel was real: all 2,800 rooms, two bathrooms to a suite, with a swimming pool the size of a lake.
FEATURES
By Barbara Shea and Barbara Shea,NEWSDAY | November 24, 1996
It's nighttime in the Catskills resort area in New York, and the jokes are flying."Jewish guy walks into a bar ""Italian guy walks into a bar "Equal-opportunity insults -- badda bing, badda boom.After all, there's nothing like a good zinger at your expense to make you feel you really belong. And if a punch line sometimes falls flat in these politically correct times, well, maybe you should forgive the comedian the way you do foolish Uncle Marty after he's had a few drinks. Because here in the mountains, everyone is family.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 4, 1993
Judging from "Catskills on Broadway," the four-member comedy revue now at the Lyric Opera House, it seems safe to say you can take the comic out of the Catskills, but you can't take the Catskills out of the comic.Food is a major activity at the hotels in the Catskills, explains Mal Z. Lawrence, the comic who comes on last and earns some of the biggest laughs. "People eat so much food up there, they have developed a new disease -- Anorexia Ponderosa."Food is an ideal metaphor to describe the appeal of this show, which appears to be something of an acquired taste -- like gefilte fish.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | November 28, 1992
MOVIES"Aladdin" isn't the greatest thing to come down the pike since they figured out how to get all that Cheeze Whiz into those little bitty cans, but it's so darn much fun you might not notice. The movie follows a secret contest between the crazed genius Robin Williams and the squads of Disney animators who try to stay with him through the hairpin curves of his impersonation of genie as borscht belt comic. Hilarious stuff. The rest of the story is passable but hardly mind-blowing, as a bland Aladdin tries to win the Princess Jasmine for his own self while an evil vizier says No. G. *** 1/2As its first Shakespearean production in almost a decade, Theatre Hopkins has boldly selected one of the so-called problem plays, "Measure for Measure."
FEATURES
By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | January 21, 1996
How do you respond when the attendant at a petrol station in Scotland inquires, "Shall I check the bonnet and dust the windscreen? And are you aware you've been nicked in your wing and your boot?"What do you tell the bloke in an Australian clothing store who smiles, asks, "Is everything apples today?" then helps you coordinate your jumpers, strides and jandles?As I travel about the world, I keep promising to learn at least one foreign language. Thus, a resolution for the new year: I'm going to study English.
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