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By Melissa Clark and Melissa Clark,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 2001
A bowl of chilled borscht with a dash of sour cream seems like an ideal late-summer soup, right up there with gazpacho made from the last of the ripe tomatoes. But unlike gazpacho, which can be whipped together in a blender without once turning on the stove, traditional beet borscht requires a pretty lengthy stint of simmering. Ideal, maybe, to make in the chilly dawn of a Russian winter but not something you'd want to bother with during the still-warm September days. This was my thinking until one day when I was indulging in a favorite pastime: perusing the produce aisle in my supermarket.
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By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | February 20, 2008
In St. Petersburg, Russia, on a late November day, it gets dark quite early. I'd entered the State Hermitage Museum's staggeringly vast art collection (4 million artifacts! 20,000 paintings!) in sunshine, but when I emerged at 4 p.m., it was night. Trudging forth, through the gray snow, I felt nearly as weary as Napoleon, dragging himself back to Paris from Russia in defeat. Feeling peckish, I decided on a simple bowl of borscht. Little did I realize, however, that there's nothing simple about this most Russian of soups.
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By Hap Epstein and Hap Epstein,Cox News Service | May 15, 1994
Joel Grey is back in a familiar role -- master of ceremonies.But don't look for the chalky face, bee-stung lips and smirking leer of the emcee of "Cabaret's" Kit Kat Klub, the part that brought him a Tony Award and an Oscar. This time around, it will be jugglers, ventriloquists and variety acts he will be introducing.For Mr. Grey, it is a long way from "Wilkommen" to "And now, give a really Borscht Capades welcome." It is a journey full of personal memories, joy, laughs and a little sadness.
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By PAT O'MALLEY and PAT O'MALLEY,Sun Reporter | February 28, 2007
Liya Kasimova, a native of Russia who came to the United States when she was 5, is a distance runner for Severna Park. "Liya is the most successful runner we've ever had. She's special," said Falcons coach Ed Purpura, whose track and cross country teams have been perennial champions and contenders for two decades. Kasimova, a bubbly junior, has won three state titles and six county titles since her freshman year. This indoor track season, Kasimova won county and regional titles in the 1,600-meter run. What has it been like for you in the United States?
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1994
Just mentioning peanut butter cream pie can conjure up a big fat guilt trip. To shorten the ride, think about a bowl of Ukrainian borscht.From Westminster, O. Hargraves asked for the pie recipe. And the borscht was the request of Charles E. Hopwood III of Baltimore, who wrote that he wanted a "Ukrainian borscht similar to the one I had in the Russian restaurant Moscow Night before it closed. It was a wonderful garnet-colored thin beet soup that was spiced and served with a big dollop of sour cream in the center.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to the Sun | May 19, 1994
When "Borscht Capades '94" bills itself as a "vaudeville gone meshugah," you know you're in for madly whirling klezmer music, surreal send-ups of the popular songs of yesteryear and comedy skits older than the hills (namely, the Catskills).This show is a generous ladling of Yiddish entertainment, but it's also a heartfelt tribute by master showman Joel Grey to his father, the late musician and comedian Mickey Katz.If the latter name doesn't ring a bell, clarinet or, for that matter, any other novelty band instrument, you may have trouble emotionally connecting to some of the nonsense and sentiment on stage at the Mechanic Theater through this weekend.
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By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 23, 1990
Borscht was an essential part of my childhood meals. It probably was for any family that traced its ancestry back to Eastern Europe.When my mother wanted to fix a quick, cold soup, she'd open a jar of borscht, ladle it out, top it with dollops of sour cream and serve it. I liked its vivid color and I loved what happened when the sour cream was added. If I gently stirred the soup, I got pools of purple and white that I could arrange in intricate designs. If I beat the mixture fiercely, I could watch it turn a strong magenta.
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By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to the Sun | February 20, 2008
In St. Petersburg, Russia, on a late November day, it gets dark quite early. I'd entered the State Hermitage Museum's staggeringly vast art collection (4 million artifacts! 20,000 paintings!) in sunshine, but when I emerged at 4 p.m., it was night. Trudging forth, through the gray snow, I felt nearly as weary as Napoleon, dragging himself back to Paris from Russia in defeat. Feeling peckish, I decided on a simple bowl of borscht. Little did I realize, however, that there's nothing simple about this most Russian of soups.
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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Baltimore's Vivat! St. Petersburg festival is more than a celebration of Russian arts and music. With more than 30 restaurants joining in the fun, it's also a celebration of Russian food. And what could be more Russian than borscht? OK, the first pot of borscht was probably cooked in Ukraine -- which was long part of the Russian and Soviet empires, but now is an independent country. But for most of us Americans, Russian soup is borscht. The problem is, no one can agree how to make it. "I've talked with a lot of different people, and everyone says they make it the right way and there is only one way," said Tim Booth, chef at Ze Mean Bean Cafe, a Fells Point restaurant which offers Eastern European food year-round.
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By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Special to The Sun | September 6, 2006
There's no mistaking the scent of borscht on the stove top, filling the room with an earthy aroma and warmth that only a simmering pot of soup can offer. Each week after services at St. Michael's Ukrainian Catholic Church on Eastern Avenue, the rich, beet-root soup is ladled into bowls and served to the faithful at coffee hour. So it's no surprise that it will be on the menu Saturday and Sunday at the 30th annual Ukrainian Festival in Patterson Park, alongside herring, stuffed cabbages, pastries and homemade breads.
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By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Special to The Sun | September 6, 2006
There's no mistaking the scent of borscht on the stove top, filling the room with an earthy aroma and warmth that only a simmering pot of soup can offer. Each week after services at St. Michael's Ukrainian Catholic Church on Eastern Avenue, the rich, beet-root soup is ladled into bowls and served to the faithful at coffee hour. So it's no surprise that it will be on the menu Saturday and Sunday at the 30th annual Ukrainian Festival in Patterson Park, alongside herring, stuffed cabbages, pastries and homemade breads.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2003
Baltimore's Vivat! St. Petersburg festival is more than a celebration of Russian arts and music. With more than 30 restaurants joining in the fun, it's also a celebration of Russian food. And what could be more Russian than borscht? OK, the first pot of borscht was probably cooked in Ukraine -- which was long part of the Russian and Soviet empires, but now is an independent country. But for most of us Americans, Russian soup is borscht. The problem is, no one can agree how to make it. "I've talked with a lot of different people, and everyone says they make it the right way and there is only one way," said Tim Booth, chef at Ze Mean Bean Cafe, a Fells Point restaurant which offers Eastern European food year-round.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2001
The Muse in Exile: Emigres and Divas series continues Thursday with Ninotchka, a 1939 romance named for a lovely Bolshevik in Paris played by Greta Garbo. The picture weds the understated virtuosity of Ernst Lubitsch's direction to the unabashed wisecracking of a script by Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett and Walter Reisch. The movie is full of cynical jokes in what became the established Wilder manner: Ninotchka defends Stalin's purges with the declaration, "There are going to be fewer but better Russians!"
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By Melissa Clark and Melissa Clark,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 2001
A bowl of chilled borscht with a dash of sour cream seems like an ideal late-summer soup, right up there with gazpacho made from the last of the ripe tomatoes. But unlike gazpacho, which can be whipped together in a blender without once turning on the stove, traditional beet borscht requires a pretty lengthy stint of simmering. Ideal, maybe, to make in the chilly dawn of a Russian winter but not something you'd want to bother with during the still-warm September days. This was my thinking until one day when I was indulging in a favorite pastime: perusing the produce aisle in my supermarket.
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By Josh Getlin and Josh Getlin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2000
MONTICELLO, N.Y. -- As bulldozers get ready to demolish what's left of the old Borscht Belt and create a new mecca of swank hotels and casinos, a bitter truth is emerging: The world of wisecracking comedians, teeming bungalow colonies and summer romance immortalized in such films as "Dirty Dancing" is gone, the victim of changing vacation tastes and poor management. By design, it is being replaced with a homogenized vacationland that will marginalize, if not erase, the Jewish culture preceding it. And the change is difficult for some to accept, given the Catskill Mountains' rich historical legacy.
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By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 1997
FALLSBURG, N.Y. -- It is 1963, and a naive 17-year-old girl from New York City vacations with her family at a majestic resort with a private airfield. She meets a dance instructor. They fall in love.The story is the plot line from the 1987 movie "Dirty Dancing," but the setting is real. Grossinger's, the resort where the movie was filmed, was real. The boomtown feel of this Catskills hamlet was real. And the neighboring Concord Hotel was real: all 2,800 rooms, two bathrooms to a suite, with a swimming pool the size of a lake.
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By ROB KASPER | January 15, 1992
What this town needs is a good snow. It will shake us out of our monochrome winter rut. Snowfall adds bright white color and excitement. People start clearing out grocery stores of bread and milk at a pace that makes the Muscovites tremble. Fenders get dented. Gloves get lost.As it is, with this rainfall I have to be content with a pink salad, a pink borscht, and plain ol' kitchen tables.It is time, in short, to answer the mail.There is a pink freeze in your futureFrom: Emma J. Siple, BaltimoreRe: Column mentioning fondness for cranberries.
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By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 15, 1992
In the waning days of the King of Late Night's reign, heeeere's Johnny Carson, waving goodbye on the cover of Life magazine, with a photo retrospective of his 30 years on "The Tonight Show" and a fond farewell from humorist and frequent guest Calvin Trillin."
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1997
Writer Sean Connolly was having a case of what Yogi Berra might call deja vu all over again.He had just left radio station WJHU, the place that had lured him to Baltimore 11 years ago. And he was sitting in a restaurant on North Charles Street, in the same building where he had first lived.But the restaurant on the first floor has mutated from French to Ukrainian and his visit to WJHU was a visit to the other side of the microphone, as a guest on "The Marc Steiner Show."Instead of working as the overnight announcer, or detailing the adventures of Joey the First in the first-ever radio cartoon, he was promoting his first novel, "A Great Place to Die."
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By Karol V. Menzie | October 2, 1994
If the menu includes borscht, potato pancakes, chicken Kiev and stuffed cabbage, the place must be Russia -- unless it's the annual Russian Festival at Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church, 1723 Fairmount Ave., on Oct. 15-16. There will also be a Russian tea room, religious items and dancing by Moryana. Hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. For more information, call (410) 276-6171.Baking for TVYou've heard of America's funniest videos -- now how about America's yummiest videos? Create an original baked goodie using M&Ms Mini Chocolate Baking Bits and star in a three-minute video of the preparation, and you could win $10,000.
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