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NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 11, 2003
STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. - Busy with twin toddlers, a part-time job and a new pregnancy, Cheri Sparacio didn't know many people on Staten Island and still felt like a newcomer after several years of living here. Her husband, Tom, was the Islander; she was from Brooklyn. But then 9/11 happened, and suddenly Cheri Sparacio had more in common with her neighbors than she or they ever would have wished. Tom, a currency trader, was killed in the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center along with nearly 200 other Staten Island residents.
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NEWS
August 23, 2005
Suddenly, on August 20, 2005, RICHIE; beloved son of Richard Boroughs and Emelie Boroughs; devoted brother of Robert and David Boroughs; loving boyfriend of Erin Lewis; dear grandson of Gordon and Sherry Cox, Paul and Doris Boroughs and great-grandson of Marie Buchter. Also survived by many aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., 9705 Belair Road (Perry Hall), on Tuesday 7 to 9 P.M. and Wednesday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M., with further visitation at the St. Michael's Lutheran Church, on Thursday from 10:30 until 11 A.M., at which time services will be held.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2002
LOS ANGELES - A proposal to create a borough system in Los Angeles was submitted yesterday to the City Council by five of its members. If approved by the council, it would go to voters Nov. 5, providing the city's electorate with an alternative to an expected secession measure or measures that same day. The proposal calls for a charter amendment that would create an elected, 15-member commission to draft a plan within a year. That commission would be required to divide the city into multiple boroughs, each of which would elect its own board to handle local budget and planning decisions.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 11, 2003
STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. - Busy with twin toddlers, a part-time job and a new pregnancy, Cheri Sparacio didn't know many people on Staten Island and still felt like a newcomer after several years of living here. Her husband, Tom, was the Islander; she was from Brooklyn. But then 9/11 happened, and suddenly Cheri Sparacio had more in common with her neighbors than she or they ever would have wished. Tom, a currency trader, was killed in the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center along with nearly 200 other Staten Island residents.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin, Childs Walker and Jeff Barker and Jennifer McMenamin, Childs Walker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - It can never be understandable when a plane falls out of the sky, but the tragedy that befell a United Airlines 757 seems especially incongruous in this borough of farmers and coal miners that is too small even for a stoplight. Suddenly, Shanksville, a place where old people live down the street from their childhood homes, where the first day of deer season is a school holiday, finds itself the setting for an international guessing game over why Flight 93, commandeered by terrorists, crashed into the hillside of an abandoned strip mine two miles outside of town.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1999
GLEN ROCK, Pa. -- In this tiny borough tucked away between folds of Pennsylvania farmland, residents have had plenty of reasons to break with their 150-year-old caroling tradition.Fierce snowstorms. Nights so cold that the slides on their trombones froze. Miserable rainstorms that soaked carolers to the bone. The Civil War. A flu epidemic that left all but nine carolers bedridden. The Depression. Two world wars.But when the clock strikes midnight this Christmas Eve, an exclusive, all-male group of 50 carolers led by a man with a 30-pound sack of peanuts slung over his shoulder will step once again into the cold December air to repeat a journey first made in 1848.
NEWS
By Zlati Meyer and Zlati Meyer,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 3, 2002
BRISTOL BOROUGH, Pa. - Against a backdrop of quaint quad homes built on a once-rusting industrial site, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christine Todd Whitman recently announced $14.6 million in brownfield grants to help redevelop 80 such sites across the country, including one in the borough. "For every dollar of federal money invested, we leverage $2.50 in private-sector investment," she said. "For every acre of brownfield redeveloped, we save 4.5 acres of greenfield. That's the kind of investment we want."
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 1997
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- The sign is taped to the window of the Brooklyn Public Library. At first, it casts doubt on everything ever said about New York. The sign's notion is warm, fuzzy, dreamy even, in the face of the odds. "Bring the Dodgers home to Brooklyn," it says. In January, the Los Angeles Dodgers were put up for sale by owner Peter O'Malley. He is the son of Walter O'Malley, who in 1957 committed the sort of atrocity, folks in Brooklyn say, for which the United Nations convenes War Crimes Tribunals: He moved the beloved Dodgers from Ebbets Field to sunny Southern California.
NEWS
August 23, 2005
Suddenly, on August 20, 2005, RICHIE; beloved son of Richard Boroughs and Emelie Boroughs; devoted brother of Robert and David Boroughs; loving boyfriend of Erin Lewis; dear grandson of Gordon and Sherry Cox, Paul and Doris Boroughs and great-grandson of Marie Buchter. Also survived by many aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., 9705 Belair Road (Perry Hall), on Tuesday 7 to 9 P.M. and Wednesday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M., with further visitation at the St. Michael's Lutheran Church, on Thursday from 10:30 until 11 A.M., at which time services will be held.
TRAVEL
By Bruce Friedland and By Bruce Friedland,SUN TRAVEL EDITOR | September 30, 2001
George Uzupis is standing under a tent at the Carlisle, Pa., fairgrounds, admiring the 1965 Corvette he just bought for $60,000. "A 50th birthday kind of thing," he says of his purchase, adding that he got exactly what he wanted: "Something red and fast." In his khaki pants, polo shirt and wire-rimmed glasses, the Lawrenceville, N.J., resident, married with children, seems mild-mannered enough. But Uzupis, like most of the 58,000 people here for the annual all-Corvette show, is crazy for cars.
NEWS
By Zlati Meyer and Zlati Meyer,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 3, 2002
BRISTOL BOROUGH, Pa. - Against a backdrop of quaint quad homes built on a once-rusting industrial site, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christine Todd Whitman recently announced $14.6 million in brownfield grants to help redevelop 80 such sites across the country, including one in the borough. "For every dollar of federal money invested, we leverage $2.50 in private-sector investment," she said. "For every acre of brownfield redeveloped, we save 4.5 acres of greenfield. That's the kind of investment we want."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2002
LOS ANGELES - A proposal to create a borough system in Los Angeles was submitted yesterday to the City Council by five of its members. If approved by the council, it would go to voters Nov. 5, providing the city's electorate with an alternative to an expected secession measure or measures that same day. The proposal calls for a charter amendment that would create an elected, 15-member commission to draft a plan within a year. That commission would be required to divide the city into multiple boroughs, each of which would elect its own board to handle local budget and planning decisions.
TRAVEL
By Bruce Friedland and By Bruce Friedland,SUN TRAVEL EDITOR | September 30, 2001
George Uzupis is standing under a tent at the Carlisle, Pa., fairgrounds, admiring the 1965 Corvette he just bought for $60,000. "A 50th birthday kind of thing," he says of his purchase, adding that he got exactly what he wanted: "Something red and fast." In his khaki pants, polo shirt and wire-rimmed glasses, the Lawrenceville, N.J., resident, married with children, seems mild-mannered enough. But Uzupis, like most of the 58,000 people here for the annual all-Corvette show, is crazy for cars.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin, Childs Walker and Jeff Barker and Jennifer McMenamin, Childs Walker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - It can never be understandable when a plane falls out of the sky, but the tragedy that befell a United Airlines 757 seems especially incongruous in this borough of farmers and coal miners that is too small even for a stoplight. Suddenly, Shanksville, a place where old people live down the street from their childhood homes, where the first day of deer season is a school holiday, finds itself the setting for an international guessing game over why Flight 93, commandeered by terrorists, crashed into the hillside of an abandoned strip mine two miles outside of town.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1999
GLEN ROCK, Pa. -- In this tiny borough tucked away between folds of Pennsylvania farmland, residents have had plenty of reasons to break with their 150-year-old caroling tradition.Fierce snowstorms. Nights so cold that the slides on their trombones froze. Miserable rainstorms that soaked carolers to the bone. The Civil War. A flu epidemic that left all but nine carolers bedridden. The Depression. Two world wars.But when the clock strikes midnight this Christmas Eve, an exclusive, all-male group of 50 carolers led by a man with a 30-pound sack of peanuts slung over his shoulder will step once again into the cold December air to repeat a journey first made in 1848.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1997
ASTORIA, N.Y. -- The name of the new hot club on Broadway is carved into a corrugated steel sign, which hangs above the potted palm trees and the blackboard advertising $4 margaritas and $3 frozen cappuccinos. Inside, bartender Nick Lion, ring firmly planted in left ear, turns on the stereo behind the bar (next to a relief of Medusa) and talks about the "very bombed-out, Gothic, Soho feel" of this place.Tuesday is gay night, and the weekends bring in Manhattan-thin women. "We've rolled out the welcome mat for anyone who is escaping Chelsea or the Village for something a little more Bohemian," Lion says.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1997
ASTORIA, N.Y. -- The name of the new hot club on Broadway is carved into a corrugated steel sign, which hangs above the potted palm trees and the blackboard advertising $4 margaritas and $3 frozen cappuccinos. Inside, bartender Nick Lion, ring firmly planted in left ear, turns on the stereo behind the bar (next to a relief of Medusa) and talks about the "very bombed-out, Gothic, Soho feel" of this place.Tuesday is gay night, and the weekends bring in Manhattan-thin women. "We've rolled out the welcome mat for anyone who is escaping Chelsea or the Village for something a little more Bohemian," Lion says.
BUSINESS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
The Sun announced yesterday that it will close two of its five foreign bureaus by the end of the year, bringing home its correspondents now reporting from London and Beijing. Sun Editor Timothy A. Franklin announced the move "with profound regret," but said financial constraints due primarily to a weak advertising climate made the move necessary. He said that he and Managing Editor Robert Blau chose to close the bureaus to avoid newsroom layoffs and reductions in news content. The closures, which are to take effect by the end of the year, mean that The Sun will staff three foreign bureaus - in Jerusalem, Moscow and Johannesburg, South Africa Space devoted to foreign news coverage, Franklin said, will not diminish despite the reassignment of correspondents Gady Epstein and Todd Richissin from Beijing and London, respectively.
FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 1997
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- The sign is taped to the window of the Brooklyn Public Library. At first, it casts doubt on everything ever said about New York. The sign's notion is warm, fuzzy, dreamy even, in the face of the odds. "Bring the Dodgers home to Brooklyn," it says. In January, the Los Angeles Dodgers were put up for sale by owner Peter O'Malley. He is the son of Walter O'Malley, who in 1957 committed the sort of atrocity, folks in Brooklyn say, for which the United Nations convenes War Crimes Tribunals: He moved the beloved Dodgers from Ebbets Field to sunny Southern California.
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