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By Jeannette Belliveau | October 27, 1991
Borneo seemed like a good place to go. The robust local people -- the Dayaks -- rivaled the original Polynesians as tireless dancers and drinkers. Parties and storytelling raged until dawn in longhouses -- communal dwellings that in old times stretched as long as a kilometer.Old women with earlobes stretching to their shoulders decorated baby carriers and bracelets with beads that had been traded along unimaginably complex routes from Europe, Africa, China and India.Spirit worship inspired woodcarvers to decorate grave sites and rice barns, using flamboyant motifs that borrowed from Chinese and Vietnamese art.Canny hunters, these small but physically powerful people were also clever civil engineers, spanning their many streams with simple wire, rattan and plank bridges.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2003
Orangutans -- those tree-living apes with the flashy red manes -- have distinct cultures that dictate how they build their nests, use tools, eat, show off for each other and even how they say good night, according to a study being published today. The study, in today's issue of Science, says that three decades of observations by some of the world's leading experts shows orangutans behave along cultural patterns, an intellectual achievement previously thought to be reserved to humans and chimpanzees.
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 3, 1993
Q: I have heard that Sipadan Island off the coast of Borneo has outstanding scuba diving. I would like to combine a trip there with one to the Kirabantan River in Borneo. Is this possible?A: The diving off Sipadan, about 12 miles from the northeastern part of Borneo, is superlative, especially for those who like to dive from shore. About 30 feet from the beach, and starting in only about 6 to 10 feet of water, is a coral wall that drops about 2,800 feet and teems with marine life, including a large concentration of sea turtles.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2000
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Charlie Niyomkul noticed a change in Vijay Singh's demeanor in the past few weeks. Singh seemed more at ease with himself, more comfortable with those outside his small circle of friends. Niyomkul, who has known Singh for many years, thought of a conversation he had with Singh earlier this year. "I told him that he was working too hard, that he wasn't enjoying himself," Niyomkul said Sunday night, as Singh was a few yards away accepting the green jacket for winning the 64th Masters at Augusta National.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2003
Orangutans -- those tree-living apes with the flashy red manes -- have distinct cultures that dictate how they build their nests, use tools, eat, show off for each other and even how they say good night, according to a study being published today. The study, in today's issue of Science, says that three decades of observations by some of the world's leading experts shows orangutans behave along cultural patterns, an intellectual achievement previously thought to be reserved to humans and chimpanzees.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 16, 1998
SAMARINDA, Indonesia -- Borneo is burning again.Just months after blazes in Indonesia sent a devastating cloud of smoke across much of Southeast Asia, flames have blanketed )) much of the island's drought-stricken east coast with a haze so thick that planes can land only a few hours a day and visibility so poor that boat captains cannot navigate the rivers.The effect is surreal here along the equator. Children kick soccer balls through piles of fallen leaves as though it were autumn -- a season that doesn't exist on Borneo.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | September 12, 1993
Lisa Barrow's fate was sealed in a little red Corvette."I remember, my father had a 1962 Corvette that I used to love riding in," says the feature reporter and associate producer for "MotorWeek" television program.The automotive program is shown on Maryland Public Television and began national syndication yesterday on commercial television. In Baltimore, it will be on both MPT (Channels 22 and 67) and WJZ (Channel 13).Ms. Barrow has been intrigued with the car world ever since riding in that treasured red Corvette when she was about 5 years old.Now she's one of the few female broadcast reporters whose beat is exclusively automobiles.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2000
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Charlie Niyomkul noticed a change in Vijay Singh's demeanor in the past few weeks. Singh seemed more at ease with himself, more comfortable with those outside his small circle of friends. Niyomkul, who has known Singh for many years, thought of a conversation he had with Singh earlier this year. "I told him that he was working too hard, that he wasn't enjoying himself," Niyomkul said Sunday night, as Singh was a few yards away accepting the green jacket for winning the 64th Masters at Augusta National.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | November 5, 1994
Edward J. Haviland Jr., a retired Social Security Administration lawyer who participated in one of World War II's most daring escapes, died Oct. 29 of cancer at his West Joppa Road residence. He was 69.Born and reared on Evesham Avenue in Govans, he left Loyola High School during his senior year in 1943 to join the Army Air Forces.In 1945, he was a turret gunner on a B-24 Liberator that was on bombing run to destroy Japanese battleships that were refueling off the coast of Borneo in the South Pacific.
FEATURES
By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 27, 2004
Stop me if you've heard this one ... Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid is a The Thing/Alien knockoff in which a band of adventurers battle a voracious creature. Centered on the search for a miracle plant, it's a familiar song and it goes a little something like this: "We are talking about a pharmaceutical equivalent of the Fountain of Youth."/"It only blooms for two more weeks."/"Everything gets eaten out here. It's the jungle."/"That was either the bravest or the stupidest thing I've ever seen."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 16, 1998
SAMARINDA, Indonesia -- Borneo is burning again.Just months after blazes in Indonesia sent a devastating cloud of smoke across much of Southeast Asia, flames have blanketed )) much of the island's drought-stricken east coast with a haze so thick that planes can land only a few hours a day and visibility so poor that boat captains cannot navigate the rivers.The effect is surreal here along the equator. Children kick soccer balls through piles of fallen leaves as though it were autumn -- a season that doesn't exist on Borneo.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | September 12, 1993
Lisa Barrow's fate was sealed in a little red Corvette."I remember, my father had a 1962 Corvette that I used to love riding in," says the feature reporter and associate producer for "MotorWeek" television program.The automotive program is shown on Maryland Public Television and began national syndication yesterday on commercial television. In Baltimore, it will be on both MPT (Channels 22 and 67) and WJZ (Channel 13).Ms. Barrow has been intrigued with the car world ever since riding in that treasured red Corvette when she was about 5 years old.Now she's one of the few female broadcast reporters whose beat is exclusively automobiles.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 3, 1993
Q: I have heard that Sipadan Island off the coast of Borneo has outstanding scuba diving. I would like to combine a trip there with one to the Kirabantan River in Borneo. Is this possible?A: The diving off Sipadan, about 12 miles from the northeastern part of Borneo, is superlative, especially for those who like to dive from shore. About 30 feet from the beach, and starting in only about 6 to 10 feet of water, is a coral wall that drops about 2,800 feet and teems with marine life, including a large concentration of sea turtles.
FEATURES
By Jeannette Belliveau | October 27, 1991
Borneo seemed like a good place to go. The robust local people -- the Dayaks -- rivaled the original Polynesians as tireless dancers and drinkers. Parties and storytelling raged until dawn in longhouses -- communal dwellings that in old times stretched as long as a kilometer.Old women with earlobes stretching to their shoulders decorated baby carriers and bracelets with beads that had been traded along unimaginably complex routes from Europe, Africa, China and India.Spirit worship inspired woodcarvers to decorate grave sites and rice barns, using flamboyant motifs that borrowed from Chinese and Vietnamese art.Canny hunters, these small but physically powerful people were also clever civil engineers, spanning their many streams with simple wire, rattan and plank bridges.
NEWS
By NATHAN MILLER | December 1, 1991
Lt. Cmdr. Edwin T. Layton was a worrier. And as 1941 drew to a close, Layton, the U.S. Pacific Fleet's intelligence officer, had much to worry about.War with Japan appeared imminent, and on Dec. 1, the Japanese navy suddenly changed the radio call signs of its ships. This shift was ominous because the Communications Intelligence Unit at Pearl Harbor plotted the position of the Japanese fleet by intercepting these signals. Traffic analysts quickly identified the most commonly used new calls but were unable to locate a single Japanese aircraft carrier.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 18, 1991
Oh, those wacky Swiss.Now here's an otherwise sensible young man named Bruno Manser, in wire-rim glasses and of serious demeanor, who would look comfy dipping his bread into a fondue pot, sipping a mild liebfraumilch and reading Hesse in any cafe in Zurich. But, no.Bruno may be currently glimpsed stomping around barefoot in the deepest jungles of Borneo, dressed entirely in a loincloth, with rawhide bicep and calf bracelets. That tube he's carrying isn't storage for his pool cue: It's his blow gun. He's hunting monkeys.
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