Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBoris Karloff
IN THE NEWS

Boris Karloff

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 19, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions about the publisher of books on horror films incorrectly identified the role played by Boris Karloff in the 1931 movie, "Frankenstein," and a correction that appeared yesterday also erred in stating actors' roles in the film.In fact, Colin Clive portrayed Dr. Henry Frankenstein and Boris Karloff had the role of Frankenstein's monster.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 8/19/97
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Unless your goal is to become a scream queen the way Jamie Lee Curtis did in Halloween, it's not easy to boost your career acting in any kind of horror film. When the protagonist commits deeds sure to damn a soul or at least imperil a body, the actor must remain sympathetic or intriguing enough to get an audience screaming "Don't open that door!" - or, as I heard during the original Prom Night, "Don't step on that head!" If gore-soaked thespians are able to do even more than that, and create multidimensional characters in extreme conditions, their future is assured.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions about the publisher of books on horror films incorrectly identified the role played by Boris Karloff in the 1931 movie, "Frankenstein," and a correction that appeared yesterday also erred in stating actors' roles in the film.In fact, Colin Clive portrayed Dr. Henry Frankenstein and Boris Karloff had the role of Frankenstein's monster.The Sun regrets the errors.A story in Saturday's editions of The Sun about the publisher of books about horror films incorrectly identified the actor who plays Frankenstein in the 1931 movie by the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | January 12, 2003
For all the attention it's been getting, you'd think Nicole Kidman's nose was the star of The Hours, the much-acclaimed film, opening next week in Baltimore, about three women whose lives are affected by the works of author Virginia Woolf. To portray Woolf, Kidman sports a fake proboscis that transforms one of Hollywood's most stunning beauties into, well, a frumpy intellectual. As the cover of last week's Entertain-ment Weekly promised: "You Won't Believe Your Eyes." That's true enough; the woman gazing out dourly from movie posters for The Hours bears little resemblance to the star of Moulin Rouge and Eyes Wide Shut.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1997
It's the same problem every year. You've hit every house on the block, your bag's brimming with enough candy to rot every tooth in your mouth, and it's not even 8 p.m. yet.What's a self-respecting ghoul to do for the rest of Halloween? Thought you'd never askOn ABC: Talking furniture, monstrous carolers and termites from the other realm crash Sabrina's Halloween bash on "Sabrina, the Teenage Witch" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2).On CBS: "It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 16, 2002
A Hollywood legend died on Aug. 16, and it wasn't Elvis. But it was somebody who remains almost as recognizable as Elvis, if not nearly as famous. Bela Lugosi, the Romanian-born actor who played Dracula in the 1931 film version and continues to embody the world's most famous bloodsucker even seven decades later, died on Aug. 16, 1956, at age 73. His best years long past, his health eaten away by a drug dependency he had only recently shaken, the impoverished...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Unless your goal is to become a scream queen the way Jamie Lee Curtis did in Halloween, it's not easy to boost your career acting in any kind of horror film. When the protagonist commits deeds sure to damn a soul or at least imperil a body, the actor must remain sympathetic or intriguing enough to get an audience screaming "Don't open that door!" - or, as I heard during the original Prom Night, "Don't step on that head!" If gore-soaked thespians are able to do even more than that, and create multidimensional characters in extreme conditions, their future is assured.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | January 12, 2003
For all the attention it's been getting, you'd think Nicole Kidman's nose was the star of The Hours, the much-acclaimed film, opening next week in Baltimore, about three women whose lives are affected by the works of author Virginia Woolf. To portray Woolf, Kidman sports a fake proboscis that transforms one of Hollywood's most stunning beauties into, well, a frumpy intellectual. As the cover of last week's Entertain-ment Weekly promised: "You Won't Believe Your Eyes." That's true enough; the woman gazing out dourly from movie posters for The Hours bears little resemblance to the star of Moulin Rouge and Eyes Wide Shut.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
"The Mummy" could have been one heck of a thrill ride, if only its cast wasn't intent on being the Three Stooges.That the movie doesn't irretrievably sink under the weight of its woefully misplaced madcap antics is testimony to a special-effects team that continually outdoes itself and a villain who makes for one seriously mean undead machine.When "The Mummy" sticks to its source material, those walking advertisements for Ace bandages that have been wandering the streets of Cairo since Pharaoh's time, it's one cool flick.
NEWS
August 18, 1997
A story in Saturday's editions of The Sun about the publisher of books about horror films incorrectly identified the actor who plays Frankenstein in the 1931 movie by the same name. Boris Karloff plays Dr. Frankenstein, and Colin Clive plays the monster.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/18/97
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 16, 2002
A Hollywood legend died on Aug. 16, and it wasn't Elvis. But it was somebody who remains almost as recognizable as Elvis, if not nearly as famous. Bela Lugosi, the Romanian-born actor who played Dracula in the 1931 film version and continues to embody the world's most famous bloodsucker even seven decades later, died on Aug. 16, 1956, at age 73. His best years long past, his health eaten away by a drug dependency he had only recently shaken, the impoverished...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
"The Mummy" could have been one heck of a thrill ride, if only its cast wasn't intent on being the Three Stooges.That the movie doesn't irretrievably sink under the weight of its woefully misplaced madcap antics is testimony to a special-effects team that continually outdoes itself and a villain who makes for one seriously mean undead machine.When "The Mummy" sticks to its source material, those walking advertisements for Ace bandages that have been wandering the streets of Cairo since Pharaoh's time, it's one cool flick.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1997
It's the same problem every year. You've hit every house on the block, your bag's brimming with enough candy to rot every tooth in your mouth, and it's not even 8 p.m. yet.What's a self-respecting ghoul to do for the rest of Halloween? Thought you'd never askOn ABC: Talking furniture, monstrous carolers and termites from the other realm crash Sabrina's Halloween bash on "Sabrina, the Teenage Witch" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2).On CBS: "It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
August 19, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions about the publisher of books on horror films incorrectly identified the role played by Boris Karloff in the 1931 movie, "Frankenstein," and a correction that appeared yesterday also erred in stating actors' roles in the film.In fact, Colin Clive portrayed Dr. Henry Frankenstein and Boris Karloff had the role of Frankenstein's monster.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 8/19/97
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions about the publisher of books on horror films incorrectly identified the role played by Boris Karloff in the 1931 movie, "Frankenstein," and a correction that appeared yesterday also erred in stating actors' roles in the film.In fact, Colin Clive portrayed Dr. Henry Frankenstein and Boris Karloff had the role of Frankenstein's monster.The Sun regrets the errors.A story in Saturday's editions of The Sun about the publisher of books about horror films incorrectly identified the actor who plays Frankenstein in the 1931 movie by the same name.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 28, 1993
Julian Sands may be becoming the Boris Karloff of the '90s -- that is, the elegant, accomplished English film actor who brings his special elan, his eclat, his joie de vivre to the most godawful swill. Not a week or two ago, the poor guy was whacking the arms and legs off Sherilyn Fenn in "Boxing Helena.""Warlock: the Armageddon" is a sad case of Hellzafloppin'.MOVIE REVIEW"Warlock: The Armageddon"Starring Julian SandsDirected by Anthony HickoxReleased by TrimarkRated R*
NEWS
April 18, 2008
HAZEL COURT, 82 Star of horror movies Hazel Court, a British beauty who co-starred with the likes of Boris Karloff and Vincent Price in horror movies of the 1950s and '60s, has died. She was 82. Ms. Court died Tuesday at her home near Lake Tahoe, Calif., of a heart attack, her daughter said Wednesday. While she had a substantial acting career in England and on American TV, Ms. Court was perhaps best known for her work in such films as 1963's The Raven. She co-starred with Price, Karloff and Peter Lorre in a Roger Corman take on the classic Edgar Allan Poe poem.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.