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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | July 8, 1995
WIMBLEDON, England -- Andre Agassi was running Boris Becker right out of Wimbledon.For an hour yesterday, the tennis pirate in baggy white shorts hit improbable winners and ridiculous service returns and all Becker could do was shake his head in disgust and tell himself to remain patient, to "look for a light at the end of a tunnel" as points and games rolled by and another Wimbledon chance ebbed away."
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By Peter Schmuck | July 22, 2009
The British Open has been over for a couple of days, and Tom Watson is probably home taking a blowtorch to his 8-iron, but I'm still sitting exactly in the same position I was when he overshot the green at 18 and came up just short of what would have been one of the most amazing feats in the history of professional sports. I'd like to say I'm still sitting here in front of the television in disbelief, waiting for one of the SportsCenter replays to show he actually made that 9-foot putt on the 72nd hole of the tournament.
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By Robin Finn and Robin Finn,New York Times jHC ZhB | August 20, 1991
Michael Stich loves tennis, yet he admits he's already bored with it, too. Just last month the 22-year-old German stunned everyone but himself by winning Wimbledon; this month he wishes he was in the soft sand on a beach somewhere instead of preparing for the hardcourt, hard-line atmosphere of the U.S. Open next week."
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August 18, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Once, just a couple years ago, German tennis was soaring. There was charismatic Boris Becker, the strong-willed Michael Stich and the inimitable Steffi Graf.Until a few weeks ago, Becker was still around and until a few days ago, Graf.But now they are gone. The German stage is empty. Or is it?Playing on Stadium Court yesterday in the Legg Mason Tennis Classic was Nicolas Kiefer.Is he the next great German player?"I'd like to be," he said. "I hope so. I want to be. I want to beat my opponents.
SPORTS
January 2, 1991
ADELAIDE, Australia -- Magnus Larsson earned the biggest victory of his career yesterday, toppling top-seeded Boris Becker in the first round of the Australian Hardcourt tennis championships.Larsson, 20, from Vaxjo, Sweden, ran past the three-time Wimbledon champion, 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (7-2). It was Becker's first loss in the opening round of a tournament since he was beaten by Goran Ivanisevic of Yugoslavia in last year's French Open."Nobody expects to win against Boris Becker," Larsson said.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 1996
MELBOURNE, Australia -- Since Andre Agassi burst on the scene with peroxide in his hair and fire in his forehand, he has been called many things: showman, pitchman, underachiever and, ultimately, champion.Until now, "escape artist" did not make the list.But the player who has changed appearance nearly as often as others change channels has transformed himself once more at this Australian Open. Already one of the most dangerous front-runners in men's tennis, he has proved himself capable of staring down big deficits and finding a way to win in five sets.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 1996
MELBOURNE, Australia -- Flirting with defeat, Monica Seles displayed her utter refusal to lose today as she overcame a gutsy effort by Chanda Rubin to reach the Australian Open final and go for her fourth championship.On the men's side, Andre Agassi finished what he started Tuesday, defeating Jim Courier, 6-7 (7-9), 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2, to earn a spot in the semifinals against Michael Chang. The win also guaranteed that next week Agassi will regain the No. 1 ranking that he relinquished to Pete Sampras in November.
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By RAY FRAGER | July 2, 1994
It wasn't that long ago that John McEnroe was a top performer at Wimbledon. With NBC, he is once again.McEnroe sounds more confident in the broadcast booth with each telecast. He's still not far removed from the game as a competitor, and he's not afraid to share a competitor's view of the players.On Wednesday, McEnroe addressed Boris Becker's burgeoning reputation as someone who stretches the rules."The bottom line is that Boris Becker's been using gamesmanship to his advantage, and now he's been caught," McEnroe said.
SPORTS
August 5, 1991
Cuba safer?Diver Mary Ellen Clark was asked whether the U.S. Olympic Committee has advised American athletes at the Pan Am Games to refrain from wearing their USA clothing while walking the streets in Cuba or otherwise identifying themselves as Americans.Clark, who was at the Olympic Festival in Los Angeles two weeks ago, laughed and said: "Nope, in Cuba there are no restrictions. But in L.A. they told us not to wear our USA sweats or wear red or blue, because they are gang colors. There's no problem like that in Cuba."
SPORTS
June 28, 1999
WIMBLEDON, England -- Martina Hingis -- gone.Monica Seles -- outta here.And the rain? What rain?And that was just Wimbledon's first week.As the world's greatest serve-and-volley show on grass reopens today for the second week, there are hints that this could emerge as a Wimbledon for the ages.The top half of the women's draw is in tatters, opening the way to a host of new stars, led by Jelena Dokic, the teen who toppled Hingis in the first round.The bottom half of the men's draw is like a glorious old-timers' day, featuring the likes of Boris Becker and Andre Agassi.
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June 28, 1999
WIMBLEDON, England -- Martina Hingis -- gone.Monica Seles -- outta here.And the rain? What rain?And that was just Wimbledon's first week.As the world's greatest serve-and-volley show on grass reopens today for the second week, there are hints that this could emerge as a Wimbledon for the ages.The top half of the women's draw is in tatters, opening the way to a host of new stars, led by Jelena Dokic, the teen who toppled Hingis in the first round.The bottom half of the men's draw is like a glorious old-timers' day, featuring the likes of Boris Becker and Andre Agassi.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 27, 1999
WIMBLEDON, England -- So, here's the last Wimbledon of the century and look who's still lurking in the bottom of the men's draw at the end of the opening week.Boris Becker and Andre Agassi.The two ex-champs who looked like the ghosts of tennis past only six weeks ago rolled right into the round of 16 yesterday.Becker put away an 18-year-old Australian named Lleyton Hewitt, 6-1, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5).And Agassi, still riding a wave from his unexpected French Open triumph, unloaded on Spanish baseliner Alberto Martin, 6-2, 6-0, 2-6, 6-3.What was supposed to be a Wimbledon to showcase new faces and stars is lost in a glorious time warp.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 4, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- Boris Becker was moving slowly, heading for the stage exit one last time as gray clouds rolled in and cheers poured down.This was his farewell to Wimbledon, his long last look at Centre Court. He was bowing, saluting the place and the crowd before waving goodbye, leaving the scarred grass stage forever.Yesterday, Becker announced his retirement from Wimbledon after losing to Pete Sampras in the quarterfinals, 6-1, 6-7 (5-7), 6-1, 6-4.It was like something out of a movie, the great athlete making a great exit.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 1, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- Yesterday, Boris Becker showed Wimbledon the old moves -- and the old power.He dived on the grass. He slammed winners. And he beat Britain's Mark Petchey, 6-3, 6-3, 6-2, to advance to the round of 16.Becker, 29, hasn't won Wimbledon since 1989.But don't tell him that the Wimbledon title is reserved for youthful players."You need many things to survive a very strenuous two-week tournament," he said. "You need to be very, very patient. Your nerves have to be excellent.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
WIMBLEDON, England -- No. 10 seed Michael Stich had just advanced to the round of 16 yesterday at Wimbledon when he looked up at the scoreboard and then looked again.What made him pause was seeing that No. 1 seed Pete Sampras had lost a third-set tiebreaker and was down 4-1 in the fourth to Karol Kucera of Slovakia.With the way seeds have been disappearing from the tournament in the past week, neither Stich nor anyone else could be sure exactly what was going to happen on Centre Court on this unusually cold, windy day at this most unusual of Wimbledons.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 29, 1996
WIMBLEDON, England -- When he woke up yesterday in the spacious home he rents just beyond these Wimbledon walls, Boris Becker, the No. 2 seed, thought he would be safely through to the round of 16 by the time the predicted drizzle closed things down late in the afternoon.Instead, Becker found himself in the hospital with a suspected broken wrist he incurred when he tried to return what seemed like an innocuous second serve from his hitherto anonymous opponent, Neville Godwin.With that single stroke, this star-crossed, star-starved Grand Slam tournament found itself bereft of the commanding presence of the man considered to pose the most significant challenge to Pete Sampras in his quest for a fourth consecutive championship.
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By Richard Finn and Richard Finn,Glantz-CulverContributing Writer | June 21, 1992
WIMBLEDON, England -- Jim Courier has done just about everything right in the last 12 months.He has won back-to-back French Open titles on the slow Roland Garros Stadium clay courts. He captured the Australian Open in January. Last year he reached the U.S. Open final, losing to Stefan Edberg.And he is ranked No. 1 in the world, the first American to be atop the rankings since John McEnroe in 1984.But, as the Wimbledon championships start tomorrow, Courier might be the most maligned top seed in recent history.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 8, 1991
WIMBLEDON, England -- Five games into the match, and Boris Becker was tugging at the bandage on his right knee, ripping it off in anger and letting the blood trickle down his leg.He started his German monologue in the ninth game and didn't finish until the middle of the third set, yelling at his racket, screaming into a towel, screeching to the sky and shrieking at the ground.He reached into his equipment bag and kept pulling out shirts. One in the first set. Two in the second. One more in the third.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 1996
MELBOURNE, Australia -- Since Andre Agassi burst on the scene with peroxide in his hair and fire in his forehand, he has been called many things: showman, pitchman, underachiever and, ultimately, champion.Until now, "escape artist" did not make the list.But the player who has changed appearance nearly as often as others change channels has transformed himself once more at this Australian Open. Already one of the most dangerous front-runners in men's tennis, he has proved himself capable of staring down big deficits and finding a way to win in five sets.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 1996
MELBOURNE, Australia -- Flirting with defeat, Monica Seles displayed her utter refusal to lose today as she overcame a gutsy effort by Chanda Rubin to reach the Australian Open final and go for her fourth championship.On the men's side, Andre Agassi finished what he started Tuesday, defeating Jim Courier, 6-7 (7-9), 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2, to earn a spot in the semifinals against Michael Chang. The win also guaranteed that next week Agassi will regain the No. 1 ranking that he relinquished to Pete Sampras in November.
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