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By Ashley McGeachy and Ashley McGeachy,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Beating the No. 1,015 player in the world normally is not cause for celebration.But for Thomas Hogstedt, he was playing for pride when he beat five-time Wimbledon champion and fellow Swede Bjorn Borg, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5), last night in the first round of the NationsBank Classic at the H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center."It was a big match," said Hogstedt, a 6-foot-3, 170-pound right-hander who practices at the same club with Borg. "I've been growing up with him and practicing with him since I was 15 up until two years ago."
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BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | July 15, 2007
The grilled salmon at the free lunch seminar tasted fine. The mashed potatoes had too much pepper, though. But the worst aftertaste was from the speakers who kept scaring and pressuring the mostly elderly audience with half-truths and distortions. Sadly, that has been my experience at the half-dozen "investment seminars" I've attended the past few months, all geared to seniors, with a free meal thrown in. No wonder. For the first time this year, "investment seminars" made the annual list of "Top 10 Traps" compiled by state securities regulators.
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SPORTS
By Melissa Isaacson and Melissa Isaacson,Chicago Tribune | April 24, 1991
CHICAGO -- His trademark blond tresses have grown back. The tight, low-riding headband is again in place. And the old wooden racket is back at his side. But the "retro '70s" look is all Bjorn Borg is willing to concede to the past as he attempts a comeback to professional tennis eight years after his retirement.His hopes are high, Borg said recently, but after losing yesterday 6-2, 6-3 to Spain's Jordi Arrese in the first round of the Monte Carlo Open, he said he was not particularly surprised.
NEWS
February 22, 2007
Jeanne Arnold Borges, a homemaker and community volunteer, died Feb. 14 of complications from cancer at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Towson resident was 87. Born Jeanne Wieman in Baltimore and raised on Maryland Avenue in Charles Village, she was a 1937 graduate of Eastern High School and attended the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Working as a nurse at Hopkins during World War II, she met her future husband, Dr. Francis J. Borges. They were married in 1950. Mrs. Borges was a volunteer at St. Joseph Medical Center, Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland and the American Heart Association.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1996
"Star Trek" has become creepy. This is a good thing."Star Trek: First Contact" is the eight hundredth -- er, the eighth "Trek" movie to date and the second film outing by the "Next Generation" crew, mercifully without help from Bill Shatner this time. And it has mastered creepiness.There are also some fine outer-space pyrotechnics when humanity faces its "most mortal enemy," as Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) describes the Borg in his great, resonant voice. The Borg, for the uninitiated, look as if they have vacuum cleaners growing out of their heads.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | July 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Jim Grabb knows about late hours. It was only a week ago that he played until darkness fell at Wimbledon, forcing his doubles final against John McEnroe and Michael Stich to be continued to the next morning, only to lose.Fortunately for those waiting to see Bjorn Borg play doubles last night, there are lights at the William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center.Grabb gathered enough energy to "tough out" the last two games and beat amateur Brian MacPhie, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, last night. Finally, Borg and his partner Niclas Kroon could take the court in the last match of the night against Gilad Bloom and Amos Mansdorf.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | April 25, 1991
I recognize that, at 34, I'm too young to start complaining about the good old days. Besides, my generation grew up listening to Kansas, watching "Starsky and Hutch" and wearing wide-wale bell-bottoms -- the signatures of our day aren't exactly those whose loss you mourn.But seeing Bjorn Borg on that court at the Monte Carlo Open the other day, wearing the same headband and stoic face, hitting the same two-handed backhand and using the same wooden rackets, brother, talk about a love letter from the past.
SPORTS
By Mark Moring and Mark Moring,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 24, 1991
BRADENTON, Fla. -- Five years ago, one of the greatest tennis players of all time didn't want to have anything to do with the game.He didn't want to play it. Didn't want to watch it on TV. Didn't even want to read about it.In 1986, as far as Bjorn Borg was concerned, tennis was taboo.The man who had won six French Open championships, five consecutive Wimbledon crowns and 65 career titles would just as soon spit on a tennis racket as hit with one.But a few years ago, that began to change.Borg was watching TV one day, flipping through the channels, when he came across a tennis match.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | July 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The little boy standing beside the players' entrance here at the H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center, looked up at the tall blond man who was about to walk in the door."
NEWS
June 8, 2003
JOSEPH J. KOMOSA, died May 1, 2003. He was Lutheran and resident of Howard County, born in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, veteran, former chief groundskeeper for Turf Valley Golf and Country Club. Survived by niece Katherine Komosa Borg, Pacifica, California and nephews Anthony, Thomas and Michael Borg of California, sisters-in-law Amy Tobery, Middletown, MD and Evelyn Borg of Columbia, KY. Burial in Maryland Veterans Cemetery Garrison Forest.
SPORTS
By DIANE PUCIN and DIANE PUCIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 2006
WIMBLEDON, England -- Roger Federer is chasing history and closing in quick. Rafael Nadal is chasing Federer. Top seed Federer won his fourth consecutive Wimbledon title by beating No. 2 Nadal yesterday, 6-0, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (2), 6-3, in 2 hours, 50 minutes. Already here at the world's most beloved tennis tournament, Federer is being compared to the greats. He is the third man in the Open era to win at least four straight Wimbledon titles. Bjorn Borg, who won five straight from 1976 to 1980, and Pete Sampras, who won four straight from 1997 to 2000, were the others.
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | July 4, 2006
I can't seem to get interested in Wimbledon this year. As a kid, I used to duck inside my house, dripping wet from the backyard pool, to catch Connors-McEnroe, or Connors-Borg, or McEnroe-Borg or Evert-Navratilova. No matter how hard I try, I'm just not feeling Ancic-Djorovic or Stepanek-Verdasco, though there's always Nieminen-Tursunov to get your blood pumping. Man, I must be getting old. Somebody fetch my wooden racket. It would be nice to see Ramon Hernandez make the American League's All-Star team through Internet fan voting - two Orioles are better than one - but how can rookie pitchers Justin Verlander and Francisco Liriano be excluded?
SPORTS
June 19, 2006
Roger Federer won his fourth consecutive title at the ATP Gerry Weber Open and tied Bjorn Borg's record of 41 straight grass-court wins with a 6-0, 6-7 (4), 6-2 victory over fifth-seeded Tomas Berdych yesterday in Halle, Germany. Federer tied Borg's record, set between 1976 and 1981, while playing in his ninth final in nine tournaments in 2006. He became the Halle tournament's only four-time winner. Federer, beaten in the French Open title match a week earlier by Rafael Nadal, was the first Roland Garros finalist to reach the championship round in the Wimbledon warm-up since former No. 1 Yevgeny Kafelnikov in 1996.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2004
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Monday Existing home sales Earnings reports: Borg Warner, Hilton, Kellogg, Kimberly-Clark, Sysco, American Express, EDS, Pitney Bowes Tuesday Conference Board consumer confidence Earnings reports: Bell South, DuPont, Federal Signal, Halliburton, Marathon Oil, T. Rowe Price, U.S. Steel, Wrigley Wedesday Earnings reports: America West, Argosy Gaming, Blockbuster, Nextel Partners, Northrop Grumman, Procter...
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | October 10, 2004
THERE'S NO question that the Internet is a great resource tool, putting a world of information at the fingertips of students and workers. Unfortunately, it has made con artists' jobs easier, too. Today's imposters still rely on old schemes, but with slight variation and the Internet, they can do far more damage far more quickly. With a few keystrokes, identities are stolen, bank accounts emptied. And it's often difficult for authorities to track down online culprits. "Any con artist that doesn't use the Internet ought to be sued for malpractice because that's the best way to do it," said Joseph Borg, director of the Alabama Securities Commission and former president of the North American Securities Administrators Association.
NEWS
June 8, 2003
JOSEPH J. KOMOSA, died May 1, 2003. He was Lutheran and resident of Howard County, born in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, veteran, former chief groundskeeper for Turf Valley Golf and Country Club. Survived by niece Katherine Komosa Borg, Pacifica, California and nephews Anthony, Thomas and Michael Borg of California, sisters-in-law Amy Tobery, Middletown, MD and Evelyn Borg of Columbia, KY. Burial in Maryland Veterans Cemetery Garrison Forest.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
For those who long for the good old days of professional tennis, when the game was played with style and grace and featured rallies and an occasional ungentlemanly antic, the Nuveen Tour that begins at the Woodmont Country Club in Rockville today is perfect fare."
SPORTS
May 8, 1991
Back to the drawing BorgBjorn Borg is making adjustments in his comeback bid.He is not playing in the Italian Open. Tournament officials said yesterday that the Swedish player never asked for a wild-card berth. He has dropped coach Tia Honsai and will work with Adriano Panatta, a former Italian tennis star. And sources close to Borg say he agrees he made a mistake trying to make his comeback with an outmoded wooden racket rather than the graphite type that became popular during his eight-year retirement.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 27, 2002
There's a long history of Western photographers in the Third World, and most of it falls into two categories: photojournalistic coverage of wars, natural disasters and political upheaval, and National Geographic-type pictures of "primitive" peoples, which tend mainly to reinforce European notions of superiority under cover of sly, voyeuristic images of scantily clad non-white women. Phil Borges' photographs at Gomez Gallery don't quite qualify as journalism, but neither are they just another excuse for imperialist cheesecake.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 2000
Victor Borge, the irrepressible musical humorist, pianist and conductor saluted worldwide as "the comedian of the keyboard," died yesterday in his sleep at his home in Greenwich, Conn. He was 91. Mr. Borge made Broadway history in the 1950s when his show, "Comedy in Music," ran for 849 performances at the Golden Theater, a record for a one-man engagement. With that show, the Danish-born Borge perfected a blend of comedy and virtuosic pianism that combined musical satire with sight gags and verbal quips.
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