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NEWS
June 1, 1993
Sen. David L. Boren is suddenly a center of national attention as he steadily gets the better of President Clinton in a battle of nerves and intellect. Both men are Yalies, Rhodes Scholars, Democrats, centrists, gut politicians and next-door neighbors (Oklahoma and Arkansas).But there the parallels end. While Mr. Clinton considered passage of his budget bill crucial to the success of his young presidency, Mr. Boren was not impressed. He was first off the blocks in opposing Mr. Clinton's ill-fated $16.3 billion jobs-stimulus bill.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee | August 31, 2012
Rookie outside linebacker Courtney Upshaw headlined a group of players who suffered injuries in Thursday night's preseason finale against the St. Louis Rams, but how they are faring the day after is unclear. Coach John Harbaugh declined to provide updates on those players, citing NFL rules that team are not required to disclose injuries until Wednesday, which is the first day when injury reports are distributed. “As far as injuries, injury reports are on Wednesday through Friday, so there won't be any more comment on that until Wednesday,” Harbaugh said after Friday's practice at the team's headquarters in Owings Mills.
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NEWS
By New York Times News ServiceThe Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | May 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. David L. Boren of Oklahoma, who holds the crucial swing vote that could make or break President Clinton's $496 billion deficit reduction package, said yesterday that the odds had greatly improved that a compromise he could support could be worked out.Mr. Boren's new position almost guarantees enactment of legislation to lower the budget deficit, said Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, chairman of the Finance Committee, which has jurisdiction over much of the Clinton plan.Until yesterday, Mr. Boren, one of 11 Democrats on the committee, had threatened to block the budget plan, which was approved by the House of Representatives in a cliffhanger last week and seemed to face an even rougher road in the Senate.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | January 3, 2012
Confidence in the health and form of Billy Cundiff, the Ravens announced today that they have released veteran kicker Shayne Graham. Graham, who was signed by the Ravens on Dec. 21 with Cundiff dealing with a left calf injury, was 2-for-2 on field-goal attempts in a 20-14 victory over the Cleveland Browns in Week 15, converting from 48 and 43 yards out along with making both of his extra points. However, the Ravens opted to go with Cundiff in Sunday's regular-season closing 24-16 victory over the Cincinnati Bengals, and the Pro Bowl selection last year made his one field-goal attempt from 42 yards.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | May 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's proposed energy tax came under sudden attack yesterday by a key Senate Democrat -- a development that signaled serious trouble for the administration's already imperiled deficit reduction plan.Seeking to sabotage the controversial energy tax before the House considers it next week, Oklahoma Sen. David L. Boren announced yesterday that he would provide a pivotal vote to kill it in a Senate committee.fTC Mr. Boren's tactic, which was intended to force the White House into negotiations to replace the energy tax with spending cuts, was roundly denounced by Mr. Clinton, administration officials and House and Senate Democratic leaders.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee called yesterday for an independent counsel to investigate whether the Department of Justice and the CIA broke laws in submitting a misleading document to a federal court last month in a sensitive Iraqi loan case.In an unusual public statement, Intelligence Chairman David L. Boren, an Oklahoma Democrat, said the Department of Justice could no longer be trusted to investigate the matter because it advised the CIA to provide the misleading information.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Resurrecting a popular social program from the Great Depression, Congress is advancing a $400 million pilot project that would require welfare recipients and the unemployed to work in government jobs rebuilding their communities.The welfare reform legislation is a modern-day spinoff of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's famous Works Progress Administration.The WPA paid more than 3 million of the nation's unemployed to construct roads, bridges, airfields and schools between 1935 and 1943.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | May 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's proposed energy tax came under sudden attack yesterday by a key Senate Democrat -- a development that signaled serious trouble for the administration's already imperiled deficit reduction plan.Seeking to sabotage the controversial energy tax before the House considers it next week, Oklahoma Sen. David L. Boren announced yesterday that he would provide a pivotal vote to kill it in a Senate committee.Mr. Boren's tactic, which was intended to force the White House into negotiations to replace the energy tax with spending cuts, was roundly denounced by Mr. Clinton, administration officials and House and Senate Democratic leaders.
NEWS
By R. A. Zaldivar and R. A. Zaldivar,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic chairman of the Senate intelligence committee gave a ringing testimonial yesterday on behalf of Robert M. Gates, boosting chances that he will be confirmed to head the CIA.Sen. David L. Boren, D-Okla., was careful to say that he has not decided how he will vote on the controversial nomination when the committee he heads makes its recommendation to the full Senate.But, telling committee members that he was taking on the role of a witness, Mr. Boren praised Mr. Gates as "the only strong advocate" in the administration for congressional supervision of U.S. intelligence agencies.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | July 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. David L. Boren, still flush from his lead role in killing President Clinton's energy tax proposal, threatened yesterday to kill the entire budget unless more spending curbs are included.Although the Oklahoma Democrat's comments were greeted with disdain by most of his colleagues, they vividly illustrate why the president is so frustrated in trying to reach agreement with Congress when nearly every Democrat has veto power -- and seems intent on tormenting him with it.Mr.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- For any president, fear is a valuable weapon in dealing with Congress.Senators and representatives tempted to defy an administration their own party have to be persuaded that the man in the White House is capable of taking harsh retaliation against them. Or, alternatively, they must fear he will go over their heads and rally their constituents against them.The fiasco on the crime bill suggests there is no such weapon in President Clinton's arsenal. And until he develops one, the prospect is for continued defiance from fellow Democrats on many issues, including his central priority, health care reform.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | August 4, 1993
COMPOSED after deep immersion in news accounts of the clownish budget dispute in Washington:Chairman Rostenkowski is from Chicago, which may explain why he may be indicted before it's all over, although of course he may not be. If he is it would be catastrophic for President Clinton's health-care program, or maybe it wouldn't, depending on what happened next.In any event, President Clinton doesn't actually have a health-care program yet and may never have one. That's because Sen. David Boren is sworn to veto anything the president proposes, though both he and the president are Democrats, as is Vice President Albert Gore, who cast the tie-breaking vote that overturned Senator Boren's last veto.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | August 4, 1993
Washington.--By perhaps a single vote in the Senate, President Clinton may get his deficit-reduction budget approved by the Congress this week. If he does, he will deserve credit as a surprisingly gifted leader.In his efforts to rescue this nation from a flood of red ink that is every bit as devastating as the violent Mississippi and Missouri rivers, this president has had to battle and manipulate forces every bit as vexing as Mother Nature has been in our Midwest.In his own Democratic Party, Mr. Clinton has been at odds with House liberals and Senate conservatives.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | August 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. David L. Boren said yesterday that he would reverse his position and vote against President Clinton's deficit-reduction package, forcing Mr. Clinton to convert at least one Senate opponent of the plan to win his budget battle this week.The Oklahoma Democrat, whose support for the proposal has been doubtful ever since he helped it squeak through the Senate on a vote in June, said in a television interview that his "conscience" would not let him approve a five-year, $500 billion deficit-reduction plan that he says calls for too few spending cuts.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | July 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. David L. Boren, still flush from his lead role in killing President Clinton's energy tax proposal, threatened yesterday to kill the entire budget unless more spending curbs are included.Although the Oklahoma Democrat's comments were greeted with disdain by most of his colleagues, they vividly illustrate why the president is so frustrated in trying to reach agreement with Congress when nearly every Democrat has veto power -- and seems intent on tormenting him with it.Mr.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | June 17, 1993
IN A TOWN where posturers don't really stand out that much, David Boren is having an unusual day in the sun.To hear him tell it, he's the only principled Democrat in town, or at least in the Senate, fighting a lonely and selfless battle against -- and hear buzz words gush from his mouth this weekend -- "the far left of the Democratic Party," "this class warfare kind of rhetoric," and the dreaded "left wing."In single-handedly derailing the president's budget in the Senate, he has managed to make honest deficit reduction sound like a neo-Bolshevik plot and the Btu tax a plank of the communist manifesto.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | August 4, 1993
COMPOSED after deep immersion in news accounts of the clownish budget dispute in Washington:Chairman Rostenkowski is from Chicago, which may explain why he may be indicted before it's all over, although of course he may not be. If he is it would be catastrophic for President Clinton's health-care program, or maybe it wouldn't, depending on what happened next.In any event, President Clinton doesn't actually have a health-care program yet and may never have one. That's because Sen. David Boren is sworn to veto anything the president proposes, though both he and the president are Democrats, as is Vice President Albert Gore, who cast the tie-breaking vote that overturned Senator Boren's last veto.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- For any president, fear is a valuable weapon in dealing with Congress.Senators and representatives tempted to defy an administration their own party have to be persuaded that the man in the White House is capable of taking harsh retaliation against them. Or, alternatively, they must fear he will go over their heads and rally their constituents against them.The fiasco on the crime bill suggests there is no such weapon in President Clinton's arsenal. And until he develops one, the prospect is for continued defiance from fellow Democrats on many issues, including his central priority, health care reform.
NEWS
June 1, 1993
Sen. David L. Boren is suddenly a center of national attention as he steadily gets the better of President Clinton in a battle of nerves and intellect. Both men are Yalies, Rhodes Scholars, Democrats, centrists, gut politicians and next-door neighbors (Oklahoma and Arkansas).But there the parallels end. While Mr. Clinton considered passage of his budget bill crucial to the success of his young presidency, Mr. Boren was not impressed. He was first off the blocks in opposing Mr. Clinton's ill-fated $16.3 billion jobs-stimulus bill.
NEWS
By New York Times News ServiceThe Los Angeles Times contributed to this article | May 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. David L. Boren of Oklahoma, who holds the crucial swing vote that could make or break President Clinton's $496 billion deficit reduction package, said yesterday that the odds had greatly improved that a compromise he could support could be worked out.Mr. Boren's new position almost guarantees enactment of legislation to lower the budget deficit, said Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, chairman of the Finance Committee, which has jurisdiction over much of the Clinton plan.Until yesterday, Mr. Boren, one of 11 Democrats on the committee, had threatened to block the budget plan, which was approved by the House of Representatives in a cliffhanger last week and seemed to face an even rougher road in the Senate.
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