Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBoredom
IN THE NEWS

Boredom

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
School is almost out and I don't know who will be more relieved - the kids or me. Now that my children are older, I don't have to worry about finding summer babysitters or day camps, but I still want to strike the right balance between relaxation and boredom. I used to believe that kids needed to stay busy to stay out of trouble. But I've come to appreciate the need for a little boredom to stir the imagination. I've taken away the video games until school is out in hopes of getting them to concentrate on their lessons.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Usually by early December, investment professionals have mapped out their outlook for the next year. But such forecasting has been made difficult by the "fiscal cliff" — the confluence of spending cuts and higher taxes that kick in automatically next year if politicians in Washington can't reach a deal. Some experts are waiting for the dust to settle on a compromise before outlining a 2013 investment strategy. But others say if it isn't the fiscal cliff, it would be the debt ceiling or some other Washington-manufactured crisis to worry investors.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Pam Lobley | September 1, 2003
HERE ARE some things I did not do this summer: Straighten closets, write my play, organize my desk, turn my mattress, clean out the toy box/garage/basement/attic. I did not go through my linens, figure out how to use a bookmark on the Web, plant new perennials or play tennis. I didn't send my drapes to the cleaner, I didn't get my winter coats cleaned and mended, I still haven't gone through last year's handouts from the school. Frankly, I've done darn near nothing. I did not enrich, enhance, advance, promote or otherwise improve my children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
On New Year's Eve 2008 - when all of the popular kids were out partying - Max Temkin and his pack of social outcasts were hunkered in his parents' basement. With nothing better to do, they grabbed a stack of cardboard paper and some scissors and created Cards Against Humanity, a politically incorrect card game in the vein of Apples to Apples. After winter break, Temkin returned to Goucher and introduced the game to his friends. It was an instant hit - other students kept asking him how they could get a copy.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 19, 2005
It may seem paradoxical that an exhibition devoted to the subject of boredom should actually turn out to be, well, pretty interesting after all. Yet happily that is the case with Formalized Boredom, a modestly scaled but lively Artscape-affiliated show at the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown. Curator Ding Ren has brought together five emerging artists who interrogate the notion of boredom, either by deliberately doing boring things - such as repetitive household chores - or by drawing inspiration from ennui as the spark for doodling and other forms of compulsive mark-making.
FEATURES
By Tanya Barrientos and Tanya Barrientos,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 19, 1995
This story won't drone on and on like some other boring stories.You've got things to do. Exciting things, no doubt.Or, do you?Maybe you don't. Maybe you're bored. Bored stiff.Well, this is a story about a man who battles boredom. It's his quest. His crusade. He says boredom can lead to very dangerous things. But more on that later.Boredom didn't start out as Alan Caruba's pursuit. Who, honestly, would devote himself to such a thing? No, it started out as a big joke.One day about 10 years ago, Mr. Caruba, a public-relations consultant from Maplewood, N.J., decided life was getting too crowded with boring people, boring events and boring movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 30, 1997
For years, John Hiatt looked at touring as offering a couple hours of fun each night, surrounded by a whole lot of boredom."I've always got three or four hours where I'm sitting in the hotel, wondering what I'm doing out here," he says. And, like most musicians, he had pretty much resigned himself to having many hours to kill.Then one day, he had a thought: Why not put all that boredom to use writing songs?"I sort of bought into that, 'Oh, man, I can't write when I'm out on the road' line pretty early in my career," he says, and laughs.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 20, 1995
It's enough to make parents want to drop the kids at the next gas station and not look back.The back-seat bickering isn't what's setting the front seaters on edge. Nor is it the whining about the lack of palatable snacks (read chips, soda and candy) or pool time. It's even worse: The kids are bored.Loudly, annoyingly and frustratingly bored. And they want to make sure you're miserable, too. No matter what activities are planned for the day, they're not interested. They certainly don't care about the splendid scenery.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 16, 2003
John W. Trinkaus is a professor of management as well as a Santa researcher. So when he makes a list, he checks it twice. In all three Santa Claus lines he surveyed this season - two in malls on Long Island and one in a New York City department store - more than 90 percent of the children were not smiling. On his six-emotion scale, he rated them "indifferent" or "hesitant." "They were poker-faced," he said. "It was, `OK, you want me to do this, I'll do this.'" He rated 1 percent of the children "terrified."
NEWS
By David Edelman | August 16, 1993
SAVE ME, JOE LOUIS. By Madison Smartt Bell. Harcour Brace & Company. 351 pages. $23.95.TWO down-and-out drifters meet in a park one night. One's a Southerner who went AWOL from the Army years ago. The other is a college graduate who seems to have no explanation for being where he is.The two soon embark on a spree of unarmed automatic teller machine holdups that make the local news. Eventually they flee to Baltimore and hook up with a black ex-con who inspires them to higher stakes: armed robbery.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
After a week without electricity, Sara Waire felt little need to sugarcoat her answer when asked Friday afternoon how her family was holding up. "Today," the Stoneleigh resident said grimly, "has been pretty awful. " Her 4-year-old daughter, Mady, bounced on and off of a couch as she watched cartoons on a small generator-powered DVD player. Her 2-year-old son, Liam, crouched underneath the dining room table, pecking away at a game on his mother's iPhone. "It took them a couple of days to go crazy," Waire said as she warned Mady not to be rude.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
School is almost out and I don't know who will be more relieved - the kids or me. Now that my children are older, I don't have to worry about finding summer babysitters or day camps, but I still want to strike the right balance between relaxation and boredom. I used to believe that kids needed to stay busy to stay out of trouble. But I've come to appreciate the need for a little boredom to stir the imagination. I've taken away the video games until school is out in hopes of getting them to concentrate on their lessons.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | October 5, 2007
The U.S. Senate has long been known as the "world's greatest deliberative body." Under the Constitution, it has a great deal of power and responsibility - confirming judges, ambassadors and Cabinet officers, ratifying treaties and serving as a trial court in impeachment cases. Lots of lower-level politicians would consider a term there the apex of a career. Plenty of youngsters with an interest in government dream of someday sitting in that exalted chamber. Several American statesmen with higher aspirations - including Henry Clay, Robert Taft, Barry Goldwater and Edward M. Kennedy - have found they could make history without ever leaving the Senate.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | May 31, 2007
Young people of today, I hear you whining about having to take a long car trip this summer with your mom and dad, and how horrible and boring that will be, and I have to chuckle in an annoying, patronizing way. Oh, I am not going to call you wimps or wusses or anything like that. But I will say this without fear of contradiction: Your summer car trip will be a breeze compared with what kids of my generation went through. Picture this: the hot, sticky back seat of a 1963 Ford Fairlane station wagon.
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | February 4, 2007
DEAR CAL -- What do you think about "knockout" games? Often in practice or camps, when time is limited, these games are played. While I understand the concept of keeping practice and camps fun by adding some competition, do some kids lose out? Often in knockout games, the kids that need the practice most are often knocked out first, leaving them to watch the better players compete. Do you think knockout games are effective for younger kids versus having other competitions/games where the kids can compete continuously?
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER AND HANNAH CHO and MICHAEL DRESSER AND HANNAH CHO,SUN REPORTERS | August 12, 2006
CHANTILLY, Va. -- In airports all over the world, airline passengers were going through withdrawal from the small comforts they were able to bring aboard planes before this week's reports of a foiled terrorist plot. At Dulles International Airport yesterday afternoon, Nigel Weaver was being forced to go cold turkey where his laptop was concerned. As he waited in line for a flight to London on British Airways, where an especially strict set of rules limiting carry-on luggage was being enforced, the 40-year-old robotics engineer was dreading the prospect of a trans-Atlantic flight with his computer stowed in the cargo hold.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 27, 2002
In The Godfather Part II, Michael Corleone visits Batista's Cuba under the impression that he's buying into a tropical paradise. Instead he finds a political powder keg primed for explosion. Stephanie Black's eye-opening documentary Life and Debt will put any American who's vacationed in Jamaica, or even dreamed of it, in the position of Michael Corleone. (The final entry in the Johns Hopkins Hospital's film series, "The African Diaspora II," the movie screens tomorrow night at 7:15, at the Preclinical Teaching Building, 725 N. Wolfe St. Admission is free.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 24, 2003
The truth, Oscar Wilde said, is rarely pure and never simple. The same can be said of Katerina Ismailova, the complex character who drives Dmitri Shostakovich's operatic masterwork, Lady Macbeth of Mtsesnk. In freeing herself from a mundane existence as a rich merchant's wife, she discovers new passions inside her, leading to catastrophe for herself and others. There's no mistaking the bad things that result -- three murders, for a start -- but it's impossible to think of Katerina as a clear-cut case of evil, which is one reason why she will never lose her fascination.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 11, 2006
LAS VEGAS --The hallways that lead to the World Series of Poker are packed with people. The meeting rooms that line the path are, to use modern-day sporting parlance, like corporate suites, each one assigned to some poker Web site or some poker publication. But right outside the gigantic poker room that houses the final-event table is a booth for Sapphire Gentleman's Club and the soundtrack couldn't be less appropriate. Out of a pair of tiny speakers is Justin Timberlake's computerized voice.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
The mix of fresh air, faux multicolored leis, miniature surfboards and an occasional green metallic grass skirt might not have been Hawaii, but it was just what Army Spc. Bryant Jacobs needed after being cooped up at Walter Reed Army Medical Center for almost two years. Jacobs, a 25-year-old from Salt Lake City, has been recovering at the medical center's Mologne House - an outpatient hotel for soldiers and their families - since being injured in a roadside bombing in Iraq on Dec. 3, 2004.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.