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By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Towson Commons, the shopping and office rotunda in the heart of the Baltimore County seat, will lose one of its retail mainstays when Borders Books & Music moves to a shopping center a couple of miles north this spring. With plans under consideration to redevelop Towson Commons, the book superstore began negotiating with officials from the complex to "figure out how we could fit in" - and ultimately decided it would be better to relocate, according to a spokeswoman for the Ann Arbor, Mich.
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BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | April 20, 2008
I'm worried about my favorite bookstore. Borders Group is having some financial issues, just got a capital infusion and has said the company might be sold. Its relatively new chief executive officer, George L. Jones, isn't from the book business and is revamping inventory to increase sales and profitability. Borders' decision to cut back on audio CDs is already obvious in its Columbia store, where you'll see lots of empty space in the music section. "We do have an inventory program under way, where we're really doing our best to have in our stores products that customers want - that sell," said Anne Roman, the Ann Arbor, Mich.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | March 21, 1996
Cartoonist at workCheer on Cartoonists Across America's founder Phil Yeh when he paints a new cartoon mural Saturday at Borders Books and Music in Towson and meet one of his creations, "The Winged Tiger." He will also sign copies of his new book, "The Winged Tiger's World Peace Party Puzzle Book," which contains 28 new oil paintings featuring well-known places around the world.Mr. Yeh will be painting the mural from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Borders Books and Music, 415 York Road. The book's main character, "The Winged Tiger," will step off the pages from 11 a.m. to noon.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Reporter | April 5, 2007
Asemiregular cast of characters drifts into Viva House in West Baltimore, quietly taking seats on folding chairs at long metal tables. They've come for the free lunch: hot dogs, salad and beans, plus a bonus sandwich to go. "I haven't been here for a month," says one of their servers, a tall, loose-limbed woman with femme-fatale blond hair. "I feel awful." If you go Laura Lippman will sign copies of her book, What the Dead Know, at 7 tonight at Borders Books & Music, 170 W. Ridgely Road, Timonium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | November 14, 1996
Good chemistryMiss that Bunsen burner? Long for those days measuring with beakers? The Maryland Science Center has a day planned for those of you who never could get enough of those chemistry labs in high school. To honor National Chemistry Week (Nov. 11-17), the Science Center is having "Chem Day" on Sunday, with live demonstrations, experiments, exhibits, on-floor explainers and a presentation from the center's Traveling Science Program staff. So pay attention.The Maryland Science Center is at 601 Light St. Regular admission of $9 for adults and $7 for children gets you into all exhibits.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Reporter | April 5, 2007
Asemiregular cast of characters drifts into Viva House in West Baltimore, quietly taking seats on folding chairs at long metal tables. They've come for the free lunch: hot dogs, salad and beans, plus a bonus sandwich to go. "I haven't been here for a month," says one of their servers, a tall, loose-limbed woman with femme-fatale blond hair. "I feel awful." If you go Laura Lippman will sign copies of her book, What the Dead Know, at 7 tonight at Borders Books & Music, 170 W. Ridgely Road, Timonium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | March 16, 2000
Return to `Little House' Seventy years ago at the urging of her daughter Rose, Laura Ingalls Wilder began to write down the stories of her pioneer childhood that she'd often shared when Rose was just a girl. Two years later, in 1932, the first of the seven books chronicling Wilder's life hit the shelves with the title "Little House in the Big Woods." In it, a 4- and then 5-year-old Laura showed readers the way of life on the prairie, from panther attacks to maple-tree sapping. Many of us grew up right alongside her, with her books tucked in our knapsacks and her adventures stored in our hearts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | February 15, 2001
Borders Books & Music in Towson debuts a book club for boys 9 to 12 tomorrow featuring works from the "My Name Is America" series. The books tell the stories of boys 12 to 16 throughout history. For the inaugural club meeting, members will discuss "The Journal of Joshua Loper: A Black Cowboy," by Walter Dean Myers, a five-time Coretta Scott King Author Award winner and two-time Newbery Honor winner). The year is 1871, and Joshua Loper, the 16-year-old son of a former slave, is on his own and on the range in his first cattle drive, which takes him from Texas to Kansas.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 15, 2005
Jose Canseco's controversial new book sold steadily in the Baltimore area and around the nation yesterday. As of last evening, Barnes & Noble in White Marsh sold 14 copies of Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits, and How Baseball Got Big, and reported that several were on hold. The Barnes & Noble store in Towson sold 18, and Borders Books & Music in Annapolis said it sold 20. The book was the third-best seller on Amazon.com. "For a book like this, it's doing pretty well," said Lary Doe, the Annapolis Borders store manager.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | April 12, 2001
Pepito is bad news. No, worse: He's a bad hat, says Madeline, Miss Clavel's little French student. In "Madeline and the Bad Hat" by Ludwig Bemelmans, Pepito and his Spanish ambassador father have just moved into the house next door to Madeline's school, and immediately Madeline deems Pepito to be trouble. He carries a slingshot, boasts and is cruel to animals. He even makes a guillotine for the cook's chickens from a set of tools Miss Clavel gave him to keep him occupied. Madeline is not at all amused and spends her time being suspicious of the rambunctious new neighbor.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Towson Commons, the shopping and office rotunda in the heart of the Baltimore County seat, will lose one of its retail mainstays when Borders Books & Music moves to a shopping center a couple of miles north this spring. With plans under consideration to redevelop Towson Commons, the book superstore began negotiating with officials from the complex to "figure out how we could fit in" - and ultimately decided it would be better to relocate, according to a spokeswoman for the Ann Arbor, Mich.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 15, 2005
Jose Canseco's controversial new book sold steadily in the Baltimore area and around the nation yesterday. As of last evening, Barnes & Noble in White Marsh sold 14 copies of Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits, and How Baseball Got Big, and reported that several were on hold. The Barnes & Noble store in Towson sold 18, and Borders Books & Music in Annapolis said it sold 20. The book was the third-best seller on Amazon.com. "For a book like this, it's doing pretty well," said Lary Doe, the Annapolis Borders store manager.
NEWS
December 18, 2003
An interview with Priscilla Pitts, facilitator for the Literature Book Group at Borders Books & Music. How long has your group been meeting? We've been meeting since 1997. A bunch of us responded to an ad posted in the Borders monthly newsletter for people who might be interested in a literature group. What are the selection guidelines for your group? Whatever we want to read. Most of the time, we read fiction. We've only read three books or so of nonfiction over seven years. We've done some of the old writers such as William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway and John O'Hara, plus current books such as Soul Mountain by Gao Xingjian and Seabiscuit by Laura Hillenbrand.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | April 12, 2001
Pepito is bad news. No, worse: He's a bad hat, says Madeline, Miss Clavel's little French student. In "Madeline and the Bad Hat" by Ludwig Bemelmans, Pepito and his Spanish ambassador father have just moved into the house next door to Madeline's school, and immediately Madeline deems Pepito to be trouble. He carries a slingshot, boasts and is cruel to animals. He even makes a guillotine for the cook's chickens from a set of tools Miss Clavel gave him to keep him occupied. Madeline is not at all amused and spends her time being suspicious of the rambunctious new neighbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | February 15, 2001
Borders Books & Music in Towson debuts a book club for boys 9 to 12 tomorrow featuring works from the "My Name Is America" series. The books tell the stories of boys 12 to 16 throughout history. For the inaugural club meeting, members will discuss "The Journal of Joshua Loper: A Black Cowboy," by Walter Dean Myers, a five-time Coretta Scott King Author Award winner and two-time Newbery Honor winner). The year is 1871, and Joshua Loper, the 16-year-old son of a former slave, is on his own and on the range in his first cattle drive, which takes him from Texas to Kansas.
NEWS
October 19, 2000
An interview with Marlene Secoski, leader of the Civil War Book Club at Borders Books & Music in Columbia. Your book club discussions include presentations by the author. Why did you decide to use that format for your club? A book, to me, becomes more real when the author is there. He puts it in [the context of ] the mood. He just tells you why he wrote it, what the goals were. You feel like you're there with him while he's writing it. And sometimes he tells you how he started to write it, and some of the stories are just fascinating.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | September 21, 2000
A 14-year old boy's adventure at sea Borders Books & Music in Bowie holds a book club for kids in fourth to sixth grade the last Tuesday of every month. This time, the group will discuss "Voyage of the Frog" by Gary Paulsen, the author of more than 175 books. The story details the adventure of 14-year-old David Alspeth as he sets out to complete his deceased Uncle Owen's last wish: to have his ashes spread at sea. David rows far out into the Pacific Ocean in his uncle's old boat, the Frog.
NEWS
October 19, 2000
An interview with Marlene Secoski, leader of the Civil War Book Club at Borders Books & Music in Columbia. Your book club discussions include presentations by the author. Why did you decide to use that format for your club? A book, to me, becomes more real when the author is there. He puts it in [the context of ] the mood. He just tells you why he wrote it, what the goals were. You feel like you're there with him while he's writing it. And sometimes he tells you how he started to write it, and some of the stories are just fascinating.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | September 21, 2000
A 14-year old boy's adventure at sea Borders Books & Music in Bowie holds a book club for kids in fourth to sixth grade the last Tuesday of every month. This time, the group will discuss "Voyage of the Frog" by Gary Paulsen, the author of more than 175 books. The story details the adventure of 14-year-old David Alspeth as he sets out to complete his deceased Uncle Owen's last wish: to have his ashes spread at sea. David rows far out into the Pacific Ocean in his uncle's old boat, the Frog.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | March 16, 2000
Return to `Little House' Seventy years ago at the urging of her daughter Rose, Laura Ingalls Wilder began to write down the stories of her pioneer childhood that she'd often shared when Rose was just a girl. Two years later, in 1932, the first of the seven books chronicling Wilder's life hit the shelves with the title "Little House in the Big Woods." In it, a 4- and then 5-year-old Laura showed readers the way of life on the prairie, from panther attacks to maple-tree sapping. Many of us grew up right alongside her, with her books tucked in our knapsacks and her adventures stored in our hearts.
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