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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2005
MEXICO CITY - Printing shop owner Alejandro Dominguez Coello was the only man brave enough to accept the police chief's job in the violence-wracked border town of Nuevo Laredo. Six police officials have been killed there since February, and city officials had searched for weeks before hiring Dominguez. Within hours of taking office Wednesday, the new chief was killed in a hail of gunfire, presumably by drug traffickers. The ambush of Dominguez , was one of the more audacious crimes in a string of drug-related killings that have terrorized Nuevo Laredo in recent months.
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NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | April 26, 2008
JERUSALEM -- A Palestinian gunman killed two security guards yesterday at an Israeli industrial park that employs Palestinian workers and whose name means "buds of peace." Two militant groups claimed joint responsibility for the attack along Israel's border with the West Bank. They said the gunman, who was slightly wounded, had reached the complex from the Palestinian territory. Fatal attacks inside Israel have become rare. This one would be only the second since 2006 to originate from the West Bank, which has been largely separated from Israel in recent years by a ribbon of walls and fences.
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NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1998
GUERRERO VIEJO, Mexico -- When the rising waters of the Rio Grande rushed into this historic border town's cobbled streets more than 40 years ago, residents retreated to higher ground, many believing it would be the last time they would see their homes.The water climbed above window sills, washed away white plaster that once covered every building like icing and eroded the homes' sandstone foundations. Looters arrived next, plundering intricately carved wooden door frames, iron work and other architectural details that made this Spanish colonial town a jewel of the Mexican borderland.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2005
HUSAYBAH, Iraq -- Thousands of American and Iraqi troops laid siege yesterday to this town near the Syrian border in one of the largest military assaults since American-led forces stormed the guerrilla stronghold of Fallujah last year, Marine Corps officials said. The sweep, aimed at shutting down the flow of foreign fighters along the Euphrates River, began early yesterday as 2,500 American troops and 1,000 Iraqi soldiers, all led by the Marines, cordoned off roads around Husaybah before rolling into town in armored vehicles and marching in on foot.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2003
TIJUANA, Mexico - Tucked into a quiet street in the hilly working-class Libertad neighborhood overlooking the crossing to the United States sits a cafe that embodies the changes in this border city. An Internet cafe occupies part of the building. The other half is a dimly lit slice of Vienna or Milan, furnished with a grand piano, a lyre and a Viking helmet. Tijuana, the quintessential border town of liquor stores, auto shops and taco stands, has developed a flourishing opera scene, the product of years of toil by many people for love of the art. This cafe is a visible part.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
Boris Stegmar was born in a little border town in Czechoslovakia, and but for an uncanny ability to pull apart and reassemble anything electronic, he might have spent an unremarkable lifetime there.Instead, he's wandering through a dimly lighted room above a Pasadena television repair shop looking for a place to sit, drink a beer and talk about something he doesn't usually talk about.Speaking publicly about his experiences for the first time, he recounts the story of his life and how he became a spy. His account is supported by documents he provided and public records.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | January 11, 2004
Except for Margaret Atwood, Canadian novelists are lucky to get a footnote's worth of attention in the American press. It's a shame that so many good writers of English are routinely treated on this side of the border as though they were spinning tall tales in Latin at an Arctic outpost. John Bemrose's The Island Walkers (Metropolitan Books, 464 pages, $25) is set in his native Ontario, but the river town with its textile mills and insular working-class neighborhoods could be any aging industrial town in Michigan, Ohio or New England.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Staff Writer | August 14, 1992
TURANJ, Croatia -- The roses are in full and lush bloom amid the mustard weed in the untended gardens of this blasted and ruined town.Here is the aftermath, what's left after the ethnic bloodletting subsides and the diplomatic outrage moves on to another place. You come here by accident.The tiny village on the border between enclaves of Serbs and Croats bears the marks of devastating firefights like the scars of some fierce epidemic: roofs smashed by artillery and the tiles scattered like pottery shards; walls pierced by rockets, crumbling and blackened by fires; splintered beams, dangling wires, every building pocked with the pits of what looks like indiscriminate small-arms fire.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2005
HUSAYBAH, Iraq -- Thousands of American and Iraqi troops laid siege yesterday to this town near the Syrian border in one of the largest military assaults since American-led forces stormed the guerrilla stronghold of Fallujah last year, Marine Corps officials said. The sweep, aimed at shutting down the flow of foreign fighters along the Euphrates River, began early yesterday as 2,500 American troops and 1,000 Iraqi soldiers, all led by the Marines, cordoned off roads around Husaybah before rolling into town in armored vehicles and marching in on foot.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and By Scott Calvert,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 24, 2001
BEECHER FALLS, Vt. -- Locals know them as Fred and Ivan. But now the two genial U.S. Customs agents who staff this sleepy crossing at the Canada border are forcing even friends and neighbors to pop the trunk and, in some cases, step out of the car for a quick inspection. Ten minutes down the rolling road in Colebrook, N.H., population 2,500, the four-member police department is getting reports of "suspicious" people, which is to say those who appear to be of Middle Eastern descent. It would be an exaggeration to say in the aftermath of the Sept.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2005
MEXICO CITY - Printing shop owner Alejandro Dominguez Coello was the only man brave enough to accept the police chief's job in the violence-wracked border town of Nuevo Laredo. Six police officials have been killed there since February, and city officials had searched for weeks before hiring Dominguez. Within hours of taking office Wednesday, the new chief was killed in a hail of gunfire, presumably by drug traffickers. The ambush of Dominguez , was one of the more audacious crimes in a string of drug-related killings that have terrorized Nuevo Laredo in recent months.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | January 11, 2004
Except for Margaret Atwood, Canadian novelists are lucky to get a footnote's worth of attention in the American press. It's a shame that so many good writers of English are routinely treated on this side of the border as though they were spinning tall tales in Latin at an Arctic outpost. John Bemrose's The Island Walkers (Metropolitan Books, 464 pages, $25) is set in his native Ontario, but the river town with its textile mills and insular working-class neighborhoods could be any aging industrial town in Michigan, Ohio or New England.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2003
TIJUANA, Mexico - Tucked into a quiet street in the hilly working-class Libertad neighborhood overlooking the crossing to the United States sits a cafe that embodies the changes in this border city. An Internet cafe occupies part of the building. The other half is a dimly lit slice of Vienna or Milan, furnished with a grand piano, a lyre and a Viking helmet. Tijuana, the quintessential border town of liquor stores, auto shops and taco stands, has developed a flourishing opera scene, the product of years of toil by many people for love of the art. This cafe is a visible part.
NEWS
By Lucie L. Snodgrass and Lucie L. Snodgrass,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2003
Ninety years after the discovery of a vein of green marble brought fame to the small northern Harford County town of Cardiff, the stone still commands a loyal - but dwindling - following. The once-common marble that earned a place in American architectural history by gracing the interiors of national landmarks like the White House and New York's Empire State Building has not been quarried since 1982. Many people living in Harford County today aren't even familiar with the stone. But to admirers like Sam Jones of Forest Hill, there will always be a special place in their hearts - and homes - for what locals will always call "the green stone."
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2002
TIJUANA, Mexico - This is not a whispering kind of town. Vendors along Avenida Revolucion, the border town's main drag, spend much of their days advertising their wares, which range from Viagra to 85-cent draft beers, at the top of their lungs amid a confusing mix of shouted Spanish and English. But there is one thing that causes the vendors to lower their voices these days. "You want a pipe? For marijuana?" whispers Cesar Fernandez as he leads a visitor to a glass display case in the back of the La Flor store.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 23, 2002
GHAJAR, Lebanon - The single pay phone here doesn't work, and nobody can come to fix it. When one man's refrigerator broke, he had to haul it out of the village on a tractor and get it repaired on the side of a road. The mailman won't deliver door to door. People who live here are allowed out, but hardly anyone is allowed in. This is life in this tiny, isolated hamlet that straddles the hostile, fortified border between Israel to the south and Lebanon to the north. The United Nations, using an 80-year-old map, split the community after Israel pulled its troops out of southern Lebanon in May 2000.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | April 26, 2008
JERUSALEM -- A Palestinian gunman killed two security guards yesterday at an Israeli industrial park that employs Palestinian workers and whose name means "buds of peace." Two militant groups claimed joint responsibility for the attack along Israel's border with the West Bank. They said the gunman, who was slightly wounded, had reached the complex from the Palestinian territory. Fatal attacks inside Israel have become rare. This one would be only the second since 2006 to originate from the West Bank, which has been largely separated from Israel in recent years by a ribbon of walls and fences.
NEWS
By Lucie L. Snodgrass and Lucie L. Snodgrass,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2003
Ninety years after the discovery of a vein of green marble brought fame to the small northern Harford County town of Cardiff, the stone still commands a loyal - but dwindling - following. The once-common marble that earned a place in American architectural history by gracing the interiors of national landmarks like the White House and New York's Empire State Building has not been quarried since 1982. Many people living in Harford County today aren't even familiar with the stone. But to admirers like Sam Jones of Forest Hill, there will always be a special place in their hearts - and homes - for what locals will always call "the green stone."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and By Scott Calvert,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 24, 2001
BEECHER FALLS, Vt. -- Locals know them as Fred and Ivan. But now the two genial U.S. Customs agents who staff this sleepy crossing at the Canada border are forcing even friends and neighbors to pop the trunk and, in some cases, step out of the car for a quick inspection. Ten minutes down the rolling road in Colebrook, N.H., population 2,500, the four-member police department is getting reports of "suspicious" people, which is to say those who appear to be of Middle Eastern descent. It would be an exaggeration to say in the aftermath of the Sept.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1998
GUERRERO VIEJO, Mexico -- When the rising waters of the Rio Grande rushed into this historic border town's cobbled streets more than 40 years ago, residents retreated to higher ground, many believing it would be the last time they would see their homes.The water climbed above window sills, washed away white plaster that once covered every building like icing and eroded the homes' sandstone foundations. Looters arrived next, plundering intricately carved wooden door frames, iron work and other architectural details that made this Spanish colonial town a jewel of the Mexican borderland.
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