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By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
A shipment of Indian cumin seed contaminated with the larvae of a dead Khapra beetle, an invasive insect, never made it to McCormick & Co.'s Hunt Valley facility and was to be sent back to India, the spice maker said Tuesday. U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered the larvae and other seed contaminants during a search of the shipment at the port of Baltimore on April 17. The next day, the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed that the insect was a Khapra beetle, considered one of the most destructive pests, damaging grain, cereals and stored food.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
A stowaway slug that caught a free ride on a shipment of Mexican mint bound for Elkridge was intercepted at Washington Dulles International Airport as the first of its kind to be identified in the Washington region. Considered a threat to crops and human health, it was captured - and the mint destroyed. An entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the Philomycidae slug was a "new pest" for the region, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said Friday.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
A 24-year-old Virginia man who fled the country earlier this year after being charged with arson in Maryland was arrested on Tuesday at Washington Dulles International Airport, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Jose Mejia Pineda had an active Maryland State Police warrant out for his arrest in relation to a car fire on Jan. 22 that consumed his 2009 Acura TL on a cul-de-sac in Dunkirk, in Calvert County, said Maryland Deputy Fire Marshal Bruce Bouch. Police and fire investigators believe Pineda and his wife, Lesly Pineda, of Alexandria, started the fire themselves, and charged both with second-degree arson and insurance fraud, Bouch said.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Endangered sea corals seized several months ago by federal border agents in Florida are now being used as educational tools in the National Aquarium's new blacktip reef shark exhibit. According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the illegal shipment of 42 pieces of coral was seized at the Port of Tampa for violating the Endangered Species Act, after inspectors determined the coral had been cut illegally from a reef off the coast of the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific. Corals support some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, and most are protected under the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species, to which 178 countries are signatories.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 5, 2009
An alert cargo inspector for U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the port of Baltimore has nabbed a dangerous stowaway hiding in a cargo container shipped from China. The illegal alien was a long-horned beetle called Stenhomalus, which has been intercepted only once before in a U.S. port and is not yet known to be loose in North America. But Stenhomalus belongs to a family of highly destructive wood-boring beetles whose members have escaped from foreign cargos and are now defying federal quarantines in New York, New Jersey, Illinois and other states.
NEWS
November 23, 2005
The Department of Homeland Security is having serious performance problems and a report released this month by its inspector general blames that on the lack of coordination and communication between two of the department's key agencies: Customs and Border Protection, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Another report by the inspector general issued in September said the department was having "minimal impact" reducing the number of foreigners who overstay their visitor visas and become illegal immigrants here.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2005
WASHINGTON - The decision by the governors of Arizona and New Mexico to declare states of emergency along their troubled borders with Mexico has embarrassed the Department of Homeland Security, which scrambled yesterday to defend itself from charges that it wasn't doing enough to combat the crime and violence associated with drug smuggling and illegal immigration. And the unusual action by two Democratic governors and the Bush administration's response reflected the political tensions that surround the nation's conflicting attitudes toward border control.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - Frontline U.S. border security officers are divided over whether the nation is safer from terrorism now than it was before the Sept. 11 attacks, and many say morale in the Department of Homeland Security is low, according to a poll released yesterday. A slim majority, 53%, of Border Patrol agents and immigration inspectors say they believe that the country is safer, while 44% believe it is no safer or less safe, according to the survey of 1,000 officers by Peter D. Hart Research Association.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | April 2, 2009
The headline on Wednesday referring to a drug bust at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport grabbed my attention: "Dutch Goose Laying Heroin Pellets." On Tuesday, we had this: "Bird Soap Doesn't Fly with Baltimore." Earlier last month from an airport in Wilmington: "Delaware CBP Outruns Invasive Mile-a-Minute Weed." So nice to see tabloid journalism back. The author of these gems is Steve Sapp. I chatted with him briefly by phone, and he seems to be a mild-mannered, 43-year-old wordsmith in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
A stowaway slug that caught a free ride on a shipment of Mexican mint bound for Elkridge was intercepted at Washington Dulles International Airport as the first of its kind to be identified in the Washington region. Considered a threat to crops and human health, it was captured - and the mint destroyed. An entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed the Philomycidae slug was a "new pest" for the region, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said Friday.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2013
A 24-year-old Virginia man who fled the country earlier this year after being charged with arson in Maryland was arrested on Tuesday at Washington Dulles International Airport, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Jose Mejia Pineda had an active Maryland State Police warrant out for his arrest in relation to a car fire on Jan. 22 that consumed his 2009 Acura TL on a cul-de-sac in Dunkirk, in Calvert County, said Maryland Deputy Fire Marshal Bruce Bouch. Police and fire investigators believe Pineda and his wife, Lesly Pineda, of Alexandria, started the fire themselves, and charged both with second-degree arson and insurance fraud, Bouch said.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
A shipment of Indian cumin seed contaminated with the larvae of a dead Khapra beetle, an invasive insect, never made it to McCormick & Co.'s Hunt Valley facility and was to be sent back to India, the spice maker said Tuesday. U.S. Customs and Border Protection agriculture specialists discovered the larvae and other seed contaminants during a search of the shipment at the port of Baltimore on April 17. The next day, the U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed that the insect was a Khapra beetle, considered one of the most destructive pests, damaging grain, cereals and stored food.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
As the election-year debate over illegal immigration heats up, Maryland National Guard members are preparing to deploy to Texas to help monitor the U.S.-Mexican border. Two crews from the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade will take high-tech helicopters to the southern tip of Texas in June to provide aerial surveillance to U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents on the ground, Guard officials said Wednesday. They will watch for illegal immigrants and drug smugglers — "basically, people crossing the border without authorization," said Lt. Col. Michael Whelan, commander of the 1-224th Aviation Security and Support Battalion.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 5, 2009
An alert cargo inspector for U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the port of Baltimore has nabbed a dangerous stowaway hiding in a cargo container shipped from China. The illegal alien was a long-horned beetle called Stenhomalus, which has been intercepted only once before in a U.S. port and is not yet known to be loose in North America. But Stenhomalus belongs to a family of highly destructive wood-boring beetles whose members have escaped from foreign cargos and are now defying federal quarantines in New York, New Jersey, Illinois and other states.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | April 2, 2009
The headline on Wednesday referring to a drug bust at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport grabbed my attention: "Dutch Goose Laying Heroin Pellets." On Tuesday, we had this: "Bird Soap Doesn't Fly with Baltimore." Earlier last month from an airport in Wilmington: "Delaware CBP Outruns Invasive Mile-a-Minute Weed." So nice to see tabloid journalism back. The author of these gems is Steve Sapp. I chatted with him briefly by phone, and he seems to be a mild-mannered, 43-year-old wordsmith in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | June 29, 2008
WASHINGTON - Bill Hogan was returning home from Germany in February when a customs agent at Washington Dulles International Airport pulled him aside. He could re-enter the country, she told him. But his laptop could not. U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents said he had been chosen for "random inspection of electronic media," and kept his computer for about two weeks, recalled Hogan, 55, a freelance journalist from Falls Church, Va. Though it was a spare computer that had little important information, Hogan felt violated.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Endangered sea corals seized several months ago by federal border agents in Florida are now being used as educational tools in the National Aquarium's new blacktip reef shark exhibit. According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the illegal shipment of 42 pieces of coral was seized at the Port of Tampa for violating the Endangered Species Act, after inspectors determined the coral had been cut illegally from a reef off the coast of the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific. Corals support some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, and most are protected under the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species, to which 178 countries are signatories.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,Los Angeles Times | June 29, 2008
WASHINGTON - Bill Hogan was returning home from Germany in February when a customs agent at Washington Dulles International Airport pulled him aside. He could re-enter the country, she told him. But his laptop could not. U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents said he had been chosen for "random inspection of electronic media," and kept his computer for about two weeks, recalled Hogan, 55, a freelance journalist from Falls Church, Va. Though it was a spare computer that had little important information, Hogan felt violated.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | March 23, 2008
Senior Patrol Agent Frank Quinones spent most of his 12 years in the U.S. Border Patrol trying to shut people out. He's tracked illegal immigrants through Texas scrubland, busted drug traffickers trying to enter from Mexico, and patrolled the beaches of Florida searching for people trying to sneak into the United States on handmade boats called "rusticas." "Most of my days were spent looking for people trying to make entry into the U.S.," Quinones said. In his latest assignment, however, he's far more welcoming.
NEWS
November 23, 2005
The Department of Homeland Security is having serious performance problems and a report released this month by its inspector general blames that on the lack of coordination and communication between two of the department's key agencies: Customs and Border Protection, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Another report by the inspector general issued in September said the department was having "minimal impact" reducing the number of foreigners who overstay their visitor visas and become illegal immigrants here.
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