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By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | March 23, 2008
Senior Patrol Agent Frank Quinones spent most of his 12 years in the U.S. Border Patrol trying to shut people out. He's tracked illegal immigrants through Texas scrubland, busted drug traffickers trying to enter from Mexico, and patrolled the beaches of Florida searching for people trying to sneak into the United States on handmade boats called "rusticas." "Most of my days were spent looking for people trying to make entry into the U.S.," Quinones said. In his latest assignment, however, he's far more welcoming.
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NEWS
July 10, 2014
I'm a senior citizen, and I'm proud of my country. I believe in the rule of law and expect it to be upheld. I'm appalled that President Barack Obama is not only permitting the invasion of our Southern border, he's also asking taxpayers fund this abomination ( "Border crisis funding sought," July 9). U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland chairs the Senate Appropriations Committee. It would be nice if she noticed this violation of our sovereignty and the dangerous alarm of American citizens feel about national security.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 4, 2006
PHOENIX -- With a major expansion proposed by President Bush, the Border Patrol might overtake the FBI as the largest federal law enforcement agency. But the expanded mission comes as the patrol wrestles with recruitment and training problems and several agents face accusations of misconduct and corruption. In response to concerns, the Homeland Security Department, which oversees the Border Patrol, said it would audit its recruitment, hiring and training practices. A spokeswoman, Tamara Faulkner, said the review could begin this month.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
— The three soldiers in the Maryland National Guard helicopter crew lifted off from this sweltering border city shortly after sunset, with a federal agent on board and three "tickets" — reports of persons attempting to slip across the Rio Grande from Mexico into the United States. They spent an hour sweeping the river with infrared and night vision, but saw only Border Patrol agents, in their white SUVs or on foot, along the northern bank of the shallow river that separates the two countries.
NEWS
June 29, 2000
TUCSON, Ariz. - Todd Scambati goes into the Arizona desert almost every day to save strangers - even if those strangers don't want to be saved by Todd Scambati. As a U.S. Border Patrol rescue agent, Scambati has found dozens of undocumented immigrants struggling in triple-digit temperatures, many of them exhausted and waiting for death. Sometimes, he even comes across former escapees. "We went out on a rescue one day and found people, and they were in really bad shape," he said. "Four days later, the same group was caught again, coming back across."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1997
REDFORD, Texas -- A Marine will be the subject of a grand jury inquiry into the fatal shooting of an 18-year-old who was tending a herd of goats on his family's farm near the Mexican border.District Attorney Albert Valadez said he would proceed with the investigation of the Marine, whom he did not identify, based on reports from Texas Rangers who are investigating the shooting of the youth, Ezequiel Hernandez Jr.Hernandez died May 20 after he was shot by a member of a Marine team from Camp Pendleton, Calif.
NEWS
By Michael Martinez and Oscar Avila and Michael Martinez and Oscar Avila,Chicago Tribune | February 18, 2007
IRONWOOD FOREST NATIONAL MONUMENT, Ariz. -- Jeannine Pallotto often rides her horse on desert trails through stands of saguaro cactus and ironwood trees crisscrossed by immigrant smuggling corridors. Mindful of escalating violence tied to a crackdown on the border, though, she knows when to retreat from strangers. "You never know which ones will pull a gun on you," said Pallotto, 45, who has lived next to this mountainous terrain northwest of Tucson, Ariz., for four years. Illegal border crossings are declining because of tougher enforcement, posting an overall 27 percent drop in the four months ending Jan. 31, the U.S. Border Patrol says.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2001
BOCA CHICA BEACH, Texas - Until a few months ago, the Rio Grande gushed into the Gulf of Mexico here, but now the river's mouth is parched - instead of a ribbon of blue, a 500-foot sandbar marks the U.S.-Mexico border. That and a small sign, some strategically placed driftwood and a piece of drooping orange fence. An eight-year drought and voracious invaders - hundreds of thousands of thirsty migrants to booming border towns and exotic, water-hungry weeds - have consumed the great river's flow and helped bring it to this pathetic end after a journey of 1,900 miles from the Colorado mountains.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
FALFURRIAS, Texas - On a scorching summer night, Maria Carlos Pascual and her three children, all of them from Mexico, are lying in the back of a pickup truck under a blue wool blanket, trying to make themselves invisible to the pack of waiting U.S. Border Patrol agents. Four children and two Chihuahuas sit on top of the blanket in an effort to conceal the family. They crossed the border from Mexico into the United States 72 miles back without problem and are approaching their next challenge: Falfurrias, where Border Patrol agents stop every northbound vehicle and question their occupants while dogs sniff for drugs and illegal immigrants.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2006
SAN LUIS, Ariz. -- The first National Guard troops ordered to the U.S.-Mexico border as part of President Bush's plan to improve security have arrived in the four border states and are expected to begin work by today. "The Jump Start operation has begun," Mario Martinez, a Border Patrol spokesman in Washington, said Friday, using the Guard's name for the border mission. "They are being issued orders and are being processed and trained." Most of the troops arrived by Thursday to prepare for their assignments, which will include monitoring surveillance cameras and sensors, building roads, putting fencing along the border and other tasks that will free up regular Border Patrol agents to police the 2,000-mile divide between Mexico and California, Arizona, Texas and New Mexico.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents on Monday seized almost $33,000 from a man at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport who reported bringing only $9,000 into the country on his flight from London. Customs officers found $14,930 in cash and three endorsed checks totaling $18,059 - a total of $32,989 - in the man's luggage, authorities said. There is no limit to how much money someone can bring into the country, but federal law requires travelers to declare amounts exceeding $10,000 or equivalent in foreign currency.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
A company that manufactures airplanes in Hagerstown that are used to monitor the nation's borders would receive $43 million to continue production under legislation approved by the U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee on Tuesday. Sierra Nevada Corp., a Nevada-based company with a plant in Hagerstown, outfits the twin-engine aircraft with sensors that assist Customs and Border Patrol agents on the ground with catching people who cross the border into the U.S. illegally. If approved by Congress, the funding will keep the company's production line open, allowing it to begin work on two new aircraft.
NEWS
October 29, 2011
I don't think my visionary fellow letter writer who wants homecoming soldiers to police the U.S.- Mexico border has thought things through very clearly ("Put Iraq veterans to work on the U.S.-Mexico border," Oct. 26). Soldiers are trained to kill bad guys, not do what the border patrol does now, which is apprehending non-citizens, perhaps rehydrating them and then sending them home with as little fuss as possible. He mentions that the U.S. military could be charged with stemming the flow of drugs as well as illegal immigrants.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 27, 2008
SAN DIEGO - The smuggler in the public service announcement sat handcuffed in prison garb, full of bravado and shrugging off the danger of bringing illegal immigrants across the border. "Sometimes they die in the desert, or the cars crash, or they drown," he said. "But it's not my fault." The smuggler in the commercial, produced by the Mexican government several years ago, was played by an American named Raul Villarreal, who at the time was a U.S. Border Patrol agent and a spokesman for the agency here.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | March 23, 2008
Senior Patrol Agent Frank Quinones spent most of his 12 years in the U.S. Border Patrol trying to shut people out. He's tracked illegal immigrants through Texas scrubland, busted drug traffickers trying to enter from Mexico, and patrolled the beaches of Florida searching for people trying to sneak into the United States on handmade boats called "rusticas." "Most of my days were spent looking for people trying to make entry into the U.S.," Quinones said. In his latest assignment, however, he's far more welcoming.
NEWS
By Sam Enriquez and Sam Enriquez,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2007
ZURBATIYA, Iraq -- About 300 trucks cross the border here every day, ferrying fruit, rugs and building supplies from Iran - and, if U.S. authorities are to be believed, illegal weapons. Intercepting the smuggled arms should be simple enough, because shipments have to be unloaded from Iranian trucks and transferred to Iraqi trucks at the border. The trouble is, the reloading is done on the Iranian side, behind a wall. So the U.S. is planning to build a 100-foot watchtower for Iraqi border agents.
NEWS
By RICHARD MAROSI and RICHARD MAROSI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2005
TUCSON, Ariz. -- A record 460 illegal migrants died crossing the U.S.-Mexico border in the past year, a toll pushed higher by unusually hot temperatures and a shift of illegal migration routes through the remote desert. The death total from Oct. 1 through Sept. 29 surpassed the previous record of 383 deaths set in 2000, according to statistics compiled by the U.S. Border Patrol. The dead were mostly Mexicans, many from the states of Mexico, Guanajuato and Veracruz, but also from the impoverished southern states of Oaxaca and Chiapas.
NEWS
By JAMES GERSTENZANG and JAMES GERSTENZANG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2006
YUMA, Ariz. -- Declaring yesterday that "we do not have full control of the border," President Bush visited an area where arrests and deaths of would-be immigrants have risen sharply, and he urged the Senate to complete work on immigration legislation by the end of the month. The president spent about an hour inspecting the arid and stark border sector marked by a 20-foot-tall corrugated metal structure, an 8-foot-high chain-link fence topped by razor-sharp concertina wire, powerful lights, watch towers and video cameras, all deployed in an area where the Border Patrol says the most apprehensions have occurred.
NEWS
By Glenn Hurowitz | May 22, 2007
The biggest - and least talked about - loser in the immigration "grand bargain" announced last week is the planet. The deal amounts to an environmental double-whammy: If enacted, it would cause damage through those provisions meant to increase the number of immigrants in this country and through those designed to keep immigrants out. The legislation requires the construction of 370 miles of border fencing before any liberalizing of immigration is...
NEWS
April 22, 2007
MARYLAND Perjury prompts case reviews With the news that police gun expert Joseph Kopera lied about his qualifications on witness stands across the state, prosecutors, police departments and defense attorneys are taking steps to identify and review cases that he worked on during a career that spanned nearly 40 years. pg 1a Low-cost housing bill debated A bill headed to Baltimore's City Council requires low-cost homes to be mixed into some market-rate projects. But after the bill has been amended by compromise attempts and restricted by a lack of money, it remains unclear how many homes it will create and where they will be. pg 1b WORLD Marine Corps found negligent A U.S. military investigation has found that the Marine Corps chain of command in Iraq engaged in willful negligence in failing to investigate a November 2005 attack by Marines that killed 24 unarmed Iraqis, including several women and children, lawyers involved in the case said.
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