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By Thomas L. Friedman | July 28, 1995
Bordeaux, France -- THE U.S. Consulate in Bordeaux died last week. It was 205 years old. The oldest living consulate in American diplomatic history succumbed to a variety of ailments, including CNN disease, faxatosis, AT&T-Direct, global integration and most of all the lingering effects of a congressional ax attack. The Bordeaux consulate is survived by the American Embassy in Paris and its sisters, the U.S. consulates in Strasbourg and Marseilles. Memorial donations may be sent to the General Operating Fund of the U.S. State Department in Washington.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
In The Baltimore Sun's my ongoing devotion to any and everything "Downton Abbey," I present to you the new Downton Abbey Wine Collection. Carson, start pouring. According to a press release (memo to all people: please continue sending me all releases related to "Downton"), the collection is available today in anticipation of the Season 4 premiere stateside in January. The Downton Abbey Wine Collection "features two enticing blends from the Bordeaux region of France: a 'Blanc' white wine and a 'Claret' red wine.
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FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | April 28, 1991
A devastating spring frost that hit the vineyards of Bordeaux ** just as they were at their most vulnerable stage has wiped out a large percentage of the 1991 crop, putting a freeze on consumers' hopes for relief from spiraling wine prices.Last Sunday's frost -- the worst since 1945 -- dropped temperatures as low as 19 degrees after a stretch of warm weather that had encouraged an early budding of the region's vines. In some parts of Bordeaux, the damage to the 1991 crop may have been total.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013
From: Entre-Deux-Mers, Bordeaux, France Price: $15 Serve with: Delicate seafood dishes Dry while Bordeaux, when done well, is one of the most food-friendly wines on the planet, especially when served with a delicate preparation of white-fleshed fish or shellfish. The sterling example - a classic Bordeaux blend of sauvignon blanc, semillon and muscadelle - boasts a smoky aroma and excellent intensity, character and edginess. It offers vibrant flavors of pear, green apple, herbs and very subtle hints of figs and honey.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL DRESSER | July 19, 1992
Lord knows, it's tempting to just give up on Bordeaux.The prices of the top-rated 1989s are obscene. Even given the fact that 1989 was the best vintage of red Bordeaux since the celestial 1982s, the price escalation in a mere seven years is staggering.Chateau Lynch-Bages? Maybe $15 for the 1982, about $45 for the 1989. Chateau Leoville Las Cases? Perhaps $25 for the 1982, more like $60 for the 1989. It's even worse on the Pomerol side of the river, where a La Conseillante that cost $25 in the 1982 vintage might run you $75 this year.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 14, 1991
Bordeaux, FranceThe French call it the "vendange verte" -- the green harvest. It's a miserable experience, but it made all the difference in Bordeaux's 1990 vintage.What happens is this: In the heat of the July sun, sweating workers go through the vineyards cutting perfectly healthy bunches of grapes off the vines and letting them fall to the ground.It's not at all like the true harvestin the fall. There are no "vendange verte" festivals, and no priests come to bless the green grapes that end up getting mashed into the dirt.
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By Michael Dresser | April 14, 1991
It was love at second sight.Last spring, when visiting Bordeaux to taste the new wines of the 1989 vintage, I was holding back, resisting commitment, playing hard to get.The review I wrote when I returned was admiring. "A great vintage," said I, but with clinical detachment.This spring I fell. With a year's more aging, the 1989 Bordeaux reds are opening up beautifully, showing even more roundness, complexity and depth than they did a year ago. It's more than a great vintage; under its tough exterior it's a very likable vintage.
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By Michael DresserMICHAEL DRESSER | July 4, 1993
If the wine producers of Bordeaux had their druthers, they probably would have postponed the 1990 vintage.From an economic standpoint, Bordeaux had no need of an abundant, high-quality year in 1990. The cellars were full of very good 1988s and great 1989s. The giant warehouses operated by the negociants who sold the wine were stacked high with cases of superb but unsold 1986s. And with the world economy slipping into recession, demand was in the tank.But nature is perverse, and 1990 brought yet another summer of warm, dry weather and another healthy, huge crop of top-quality grapes.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 28, 1993
Q: Do you know of companies that run tours of the wine regions of France?.A: World Wine Tours, 69-71 Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6PE, England, telephone (0865) 310 344 (the country code for England is 44; when dialing from the United States drop the zero before the area code), offers six such itineraries in France, each led by a wine expert.There are separate tours to Alsace, the Loire Valley, Bordeaux, Gascony, Burgundy and the Rhone Valley. The five-day Alsace tour, beginning June 26 and Aug. 29 in Basel, costs $1,320 a person based on two sharing a room, and includes lodging, meals, visits to wineries and wine tastings.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | January 18, 1998
For the most part, wine is a joy, but occasionally you encounter a bottle that is profoundly depressing.Such a wine was the 1994 Chateau Moulin de Tricot. It was a red Bordeaux from the famous village of Margaux. The vintage was a very good one. The price tag suggested that this would be a fine bottle of wine.It was repulsive.The 1994 Moulin de Tricot was a harsh, skunky, greenish, tannic wine -- devoid of fruit or any other pleasure. It was the kind of wine that made you want to apologize to the sink you poured it down.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
"Men are like wine - some turn to vinegar, but the best improve with age. " - Pope John Paul XXIII Nelson Carey, the genial publican at Belvedere Square's Grand Cru wine bar, is naturally filled with interesting and offbeat wine, beer and booze trivia, which on occasion he dispenses to interested listeners. The other day, while talking to several regulars about Pope Francis, he uncorked the fact that Chateauneuf-du-Pape, the great, robust red from France's Rhone Valley region, has direct papal ties.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2011
The 2009 red wines I recently sampled from a group called Planet Bordeaux are a great omen for devotees of these great wines. And the Lauduc Prestige was the best of the group, with lush, ripe flavors and a concentration and complexity unusual in wines that carry the less-than-exalted appelation of Bordeaux Superieur. It's lovely now, with its gripping black cherry and black currant flavors, but should develop well over 5 to 7 years. Its little brother, the 2009 Chateau Lauduc Classic Bordeaux Rouge, is less complex but a fantastic value at an estimated price of $8 if you drink it over the next year or two. From: Bordeaux Superieur, France Price: $20 Serve with: Lamb chops, high-quality steak
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
This red wine blend offers impressive complexity for the price and is widely distributed by K-J, which may lack in snob factor but makes quite reliable wines. The winery calls this wine a "renegade" because the blend includes both Bordeaux varieties and other grapes, including zinfandel, syrah and petite sirah. I'm not sure that makes it all that revolutionary — California produces lots of offbeat blends — but it's very tasty. It offers pure, penetrating black cherry, black currant and herb flavors and is smooth, balanced and ready to drink.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
"Grass is for Cows" is the motto of this producer, and it delivers a sauvignon blanc that is notable for its lack of grassy, herbal notes. Neither is it overly fig-flavored — the extreme some producers veer toward. It's a subtle, smoky, mineral-infused wine that reminds me very much of a good Graves from Bordeaux. It seems to be structured for longer aging than most California whites, and could develop very nicely with a year or two aging — something I rarely say about a sauvignon blanc.
NEWS
March 14, 2010
HEINZ STAHLSCHMIDT WWII demolitions expert Heinz Stahlschmidt, a World War II demolitions expert in the German navy who disobeyed orders to raze the crucial French port of Bordeaux and instead set off a controlled explosion that was credited with saving the city, died Feb. 23. In late August 1944, with Allied forces closing in, he was ordered by his superiors to rig Bordeaux's docks to blow. Stahlschmidt said he could not bring himself to perform the job. He killed dozens of Germans with his controlled blasts but spared nearly 3,500 civilians - the number the Germans expected to die in the port blast.
NEWS
By Daniel Morris | September 1, 2009
In my graduate class on Arab politics, we would often puzzle over decisions autocratic leaders have made that did not seem to make sense, either in moral or strategic terms. It was often tempting to take the intellectually lazy route and think they were simply crazy or stupid. In order to make the discussion more productive, the professor would suggest that we assume the leaders are at least as smart as ourselves. In recent weeks, the only person convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing was released to Libyan soil, where he received a jubilant welcome organized by Libyan leader Col. Muammar el Kadafi.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN WINE CRITIC | June 22, 1997
Americans are notorious cherry-pickers when it comes to red Bordeaux.In top vintages, we are more than willing to open our wallets to stock our cellars with classic claret. But let there be even so much as a suggestion that the vintage is below par and we bail out of the market in about as much time as it takes to pop a cork.For the most part, this reflects savvy judgment. Yes, we might miss some bargains, such as the underrated and precocious 1993s, but it makes a lot of sense to leave such vintages as 1991 and 1992 to the Japanese and to French supermarket chains.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | September 8, 1999
1996 Chateau Greysac, Medoc ($15). During the 1970s, Chateau Greysac made a reputation as an excellent value in red Bordeaux. Its star waned in recent years, but now -- with the need for bargain Bordeaux greater than ever -- Greysac appears to have returned to form. The 1996 might be the property's best wine since 1975. It offers lush black cherry fruit, firm structure and a suppleness that makes it a pleasure to drink young. It offers appealing nuances of pipe tobacco and cedar.
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