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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Chris Kaltenbach and Laura Barnhardt and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTERS | December 6, 2007
Mike Psenicska says he's tried to be a good sport about his unwitting big-screen debut in the blockbuster Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan. He went to see the movie with his family. He has answered strangers' questions about his sudden celebrity, has smiled for pictures and, he says, even autographed one teenager's wrist. But the 64-year-old Perry Hall driving instructor says he didn't seek the attention, and he was hoping yesterday's snow would allow news of his lawsuit against the filmmakers to come out without too much notice.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
On Late Night With David Letterman, it was riotously funny to watch Sacha Baron Cohen accept accolades for the quarter-billion-dollar success of Borat, then explain how, for his new film, Bruno, he set up a meeting with a West Bank terrorist and staged a potentially deadly cage match in Arkansas. I eagerly await the "making of" documentary on DVD. In fact, that appearance had everything the feature film lacks: a lucid explanation for the action in the movie and an interlocutor, Letterman, who could provide a sane response to extreme material.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | November 10, 2006
MOSCOW -- A British comedian impersonating a Kazakh reporter who clashes with feminists and learns the ways of evangelical Christianity on a cross-country romp through the United States doesn't seem a likely enemy of the Russian state. But, apparently, Russia thinks he is. The satirical film, in which the fictional Borat Sagdiyev during a cultural fact-finding mission to America portrays his central Asian homeland as one where women are kept in cages and homosexuals were once forced to wear blue hats, will not appear on movie screens here.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Chris Kaltenbach and Laura Barnhardt and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTERS | December 6, 2007
Mike Psenicska says he's tried to be a good sport about his unwitting big-screen debut in the blockbuster Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan. He went to see the movie with his family. He has answered strangers' questions about his sudden celebrity, has smiled for pictures and, he says, even autographed one teenager's wrist. But the 64-year-old Perry Hall driving instructor says he didn't seek the attention, and he was hoping yesterday's snow would allow news of his lawsuit against the filmmakers to come out without too much notice.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 3, 2006
Borat is a terrific, risky comic creation: a village idiot for the global village. A TV reporter from Kazakhstan, a country that as pictured here makes Tobacco Road look like Park Avenue, Borat comes to the United States and discovers everything you always wanted to know about America but were afraid to ask. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (20th Century Fox) Starring Sacha Baron Cohen. Directed by Larry Charles. Rated R. Time 85 minutes.
FEATURES
By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 2007
HOLLYWOOD -- It was a little disconcerting to see Sacha Baron Cohen without his Borat mustache. When the lanky comedian showed up the other day for his first newspaper interview as himself since the inception of Borat-mania last fall, Cohen looked a little smaller than life, especially compared with the outsize character who caused such a sensation in Borat. Sipping hot lemon tea at a coffee shop in Santa Monica, Cohen had the air of a man who had shed a layer of skin that had been worn to a frazzle.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
On Late Night With David Letterman, it was riotously funny to watch Sacha Baron Cohen accept accolades for the quarter-billion-dollar success of Borat, then explain how, for his new film, Bruno, he set up a meeting with a West Bank terrorist and staged a potentially deadly cage match in Arkansas. I eagerly await the "making of" documentary on DVD. In fact, that appearance had everything the feature film lacks: a lucid explanation for the action in the movie and an interlocutor, Letterman, who could provide a sane response to extreme material.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SARAH KICKLER KELBER] | January 25, 2007
What's the point? -- Ever dissatisfied with the conclusion of a film you've just invested a couple of hours of your life in? So are the folks at How It Should Have Ended. Instead of just whining about it, they make short animated films with more logical endings. What to look for --Recent postings include an alternate ending for Borat that has the title character thanking everyone for all the money and suggesting that people read contracts before signing them, as well as a Texas Chainsaw Massacre short that has the film ending during any chase scene with the killer getting a swift kick, followed by a beat-down.
NEWS
By Niall Ferguson | November 17, 2006
In addition to being a brilliant satirist, Sacha Baron Cohen was once a rather good historian. In fact, he is by far my most successful former student. I can still remember how well he used to play the part of a studious Cambridge undergraduate, taking me in completely. With the character of Borat, however, he has gone one better. He has taken in America. The amazing thing about his new film is how brutally it ridicules the United States. Borat's victims are all hapless Americans, mugged by Oxbridge irony.
FEATURES
By Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach | December 22, 2006
Apocalypto -- pits a spotless young man, Jaguar Paw (Rudy Youngblood), the son of Flint Sky (Morris Birdyellowhead), a Mayan jungle chieftain, against evil marauders led by their majestically efficient captain Zero Wolf (Raoul Trujillo) and the satanically sadistic Snake Ink (Rodolfo Palacios). Although it's told in a Mayan dialect, with English subtitles, the movie is just an arthouse film for jocks. Only the surface is exotic: the Mayan empire in its late-decadent phase. Otherwise, the life-or-death jeopardy is so basic, director Mel Gibson might as well be filming a good guy trying to stop a train before it hits the damsel tied to the railroad tracks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [SARAH KICKLER KELBER] | January 25, 2007
What's the point? -- Ever dissatisfied with the conclusion of a film you've just invested a couple of hours of your life in? So are the folks at How It Should Have Ended. Instead of just whining about it, they make short animated films with more logical endings. What to look for --Recent postings include an alternate ending for Borat that has the title character thanking everyone for all the money and suggesting that people read contracts before signing them, as well as a Texas Chainsaw Massacre short that has the film ending during any chase scene with the killer getting a swift kick, followed by a beat-down.
FEATURES
By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,Los Angeles Times | January 12, 2007
HOLLYWOOD -- It was a little disconcerting to see Sacha Baron Cohen without his Borat mustache. When the lanky comedian showed up the other day for his first newspaper interview as himself since the inception of Borat-mania last fall, Cohen looked a little smaller than life, especially compared with the outsize character who caused such a sensation in Borat. Sipping hot lemon tea at a coffee shop in Santa Monica, Cohen had the air of a man who had shed a layer of skin that had been worn to a frazzle.
FEATURES
By Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach | December 22, 2006
Apocalypto -- pits a spotless young man, Jaguar Paw (Rudy Youngblood), the son of Flint Sky (Morris Birdyellowhead), a Mayan jungle chieftain, against evil marauders led by their majestically efficient captain Zero Wolf (Raoul Trujillo) and the satanically sadistic Snake Ink (Rodolfo Palacios). Although it's told in a Mayan dialect, with English subtitles, the movie is just an arthouse film for jocks. Only the surface is exotic: the Mayan empire in its late-decadent phase. Otherwise, the life-or-death jeopardy is so basic, director Mel Gibson might as well be filming a good guy trying to stop a train before it hits the damsel tied to the railroad tracks.
NEWS
By Niall Ferguson | November 17, 2006
In addition to being a brilliant satirist, Sacha Baron Cohen was once a rather good historian. In fact, he is by far my most successful former student. I can still remember how well he used to play the part of a studious Cambridge undergraduate, taking me in completely. With the character of Borat, however, he has gone one better. He has taken in America. The amazing thing about his new film is how brutally it ridicules the United States. Borat's victims are all hapless Americans, mugged by Oxbridge irony.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | November 10, 2006
MOSCOW -- A British comedian impersonating a Kazakh reporter who clashes with feminists and learns the ways of evangelical Christianity on a cross-country romp through the United States doesn't seem a likely enemy of the Russian state. But, apparently, Russia thinks he is. The satirical film, in which the fictional Borat Sagdiyev during a cultural fact-finding mission to America portrays his central Asian homeland as one where women are kept in cages and homosexuals were once forced to wear blue hats, will not appear on movie screens here.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
The new TV ads for the cutting-edge reality comedy Borat focus on shots of packed opening-weekend audiences stunned into silence by some hugely offensive statements about women, Jews, gays or slavery, then breaking into convulsive laughter. On the phone from Los Angeles, producer Jay Roach said the filmmakers knew they would get this reaction: "We tested and tested it with audiences." The testing proved that most audiences would respond with exasperation at Borat's racism, homophobia, anti-Semitism and misogyny, while retaining their sympathy for the clueless Kazakh TV reporter making a documentary about America and becoming obsessed with Pamela Anderson along the way. Of course, the B'nai B'rith, the Russian government and other, less-vocal, groups have registered everything from sheer outrage to worry over whether some audiences will take Borat's antics straight.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 10, 2006
The new TV ads for the cutting-edge reality comedy Borat focus on shots of packed opening-weekend audiences stunned into silence by some hugely offensive statements about women, Jews, gays or slavery, then breaking into convulsive laughter. On the phone from Los Angeles, producer Jay Roach said the filmmakers knew they would get this reaction: "We tested and tested it with audiences." The testing proved that most audiences would respond with exasperation at Borat's racism, homophobia, anti-Semitism and misogyny, while retaining their sympathy for the clueless Kazakh TV reporter making a documentary about America and becoming obsessed with Pamela Anderson along the way. Of course, the B'nai B'rith, the Russian government and other, less-vocal, groups have registered everything from sheer outrage to worry over whether some audiences will take Borat's antics straight.
NEWS
By [TIM SWIFT] | December 23, 2007
The sentimental overload of the Christmas season can be too much for even the sappiest souls trapped at family gatherings. Luckily, a jolt of dark satire about faraway locales (that aren't Aunt Janice's den) is only a coffee table away. Here are some of the new standouts that can be found at most major bookstores: 1. Borat Touristic Guidings to Minor Nation of U.S. and A. / Touristic Guidings to Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan Author: Borat Sagdiyev Price: $24.99 Why we like it: The raunchy movie has been encapsulated into a coffee book.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 3, 2006
Borat is a terrific, risky comic creation: a village idiot for the global village. A TV reporter from Kazakhstan, a country that as pictured here makes Tobacco Road look like Park Avenue, Borat comes to the United States and discovers everything you always wanted to know about America but were afraid to ask. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (20th Century Fox) Starring Sacha Baron Cohen. Directed by Larry Charles. Rated R. Time 85 minutes.
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