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By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 22, 2006
POTOMAC -- After going to Congressional Country Club in 1980, the Kemper Open became a must-play event on the PGA Tour schedule. Though the move seven years later to the nearby Tournament Players Club at Avenel lessened its popularity among the players, it still seemed to be one of the tour's more stable events. Now it's teetering on extinction. Uncertainty is the dominant theme going into today's opening round of the Booz Allen Classic, the third year under that corporate logo after one year as the short-lived FBR Capital Open.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | March 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- During his rookie season on the PGA Tour in 1996, Tiger Woods and his father, Earl, set up a foundation to help disadvantaged children. They eventually opened a learning center near the family's California home. The only thing that Woods and his father talked about but never accomplished was starting a golf tournament to benefit the foundation. Earl Woods died last year, but the tournament has now become a reality. During a jam-packed news conference at the National Press Club, Woods and PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem announced yesterday that the AT&T National will be played July 5-8 in the Washington area.
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SPORTS
By Daniel Lyght and Daniel Lyght,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
POTOMAC - For two rounds in the Booz Allen Classic, TPC at Avenel took a beating like a boxer past his prime. Charles Howell III shot a record-low 61 Thursday and was followed by his friend, Adam Scott, who recorded a tournament-record-low 128 for two rounds Friday. But the course fought back yesterday, delivering blows that sent several golfers to the canvas and others staggering to their corners. Rich Beem was one of the players who will have to regroup and come out swinging today in the final round if he plans to have a chance at the championship.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
POTOMAC -- The circumstances of Ben Curtis' two PGA Tour victories could not have been any different. The first, coming in the 2003 British Open, took place at venerable Royal St. George's before a crowd of 37,000 boisterous fans on a sunny Sunday afternoon, with Curtis watching as some of golf's biggest names hacked up the last few holes to hand a then-unknown 26-year-old rookie a one-stroke win and the coveted Claret Jug. The second came yesterday, in...
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2004
POTOMAC - Lee Janzen noticed the difference between last week's U.S. Open and the Booz Allen Classic the moment he stepped onto the grounds of the Tournament Players Club at Avenel earlier this week. "There's not 40,000 people here on Monday or Tuesday or Wednesday," Janzen, a two-time Open champion, said yesterday as he walked unimpeded from the practice range to the first tee for the pro-am. "And there may not be Thursday or Friday." The size of the crowd will not be the only contrast.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
There will be a different feel this week to the Washington, D.C., area's only PGA Tour stop. It will seem like the old days, when the Booz Allen Classic was still called the Kemper Open and when the game's biggest names used to show up at Congressional Country Club with the same regularity as the cherry blossoms along the Tidal Basin. That's because the tournament, which begins tomorrow and runs through Sunday, will be played at the venerable Bethesda club for the first time since 1986.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
POTOMAC -- The circumstances of Ben Curtis' two PGA Tour victories could not have been any different. The first, coming in the 2003 British Open, took place at venerable Royal St. George's before a crowd of 37,000 boisterous fans on a sunny Sunday afternoon, with Curtis watching as some of golf's biggest names hacked up the last few holes to hand a then-unknown 26-year-old rookie a one-stroke win and the coveted Claret Jug. The second came yesterday, in...
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
POTOMAC -- Ben Curtis took down the sign outside the pro shop at Mill Creek Golf Club a year after his first PGA Tour victory, the sign proclaiming the public course that his grandfather built near Columbus, Ohio, as the home of the 2003 British Open champion. "He wanted to get the monkey off his back," Nancy Plant, one of Curtis' aunts and a part owner of the club, said yesterday morning from the clubhouse as she followed her nephew's third round in the Booz Allen Classic on the Internet.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2004
POTOMAC - The opening round of the $4.8 million Booz Allen Classic was the perfect remedy for any post-U.S. Open blues of Charles Howell III. Howell, who shot a final round of 83 Sunday on the brown and crusty greens of Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in Southampton, N.Y., was 22 strokes better yesterday on the soft and inviting surfaces of the Tournament Players Club at Avenel. An opening round of 10-under-par 61, including a course-record 8-under 28 on Howell's last nine holes, was both a career-best and competitive course record, giving Howell a three-stroke lead over former PGA and Kemper Open champion Rich Beem and journeyman Olin Browne.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2004
POTOMAC - Battles between twentysomethings and fortysomethings aren't unusual on the PGA Tour these days, and the $4.8 million Booz Allen Classic could provide the latest backdrop for this kind of generational jousting. Representing the tour's up-and-comers, Adam Scott followed Charles Howell III into the event's record book and to the top of the leader board yesterday at the Tournament Players Club at Avenel. Scott, a 23-year-old Australian who earlier this year won the prestigious Players Championship, shot a 9-under-par 62 in the second round and broke the tournament's 36-hole scoring mark by two strokes.
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June 27, 2006
MARYLAND PSC sues to stop firings The Maryland Public Service Commission sued yesterday to stop a new law that fires its five members, saying the measure is an unconstitutional power grab by a Democratic-controlled legislature looking to weaken a Republican chief executive. pg 1a Schools dispute graduation data Baltimore school officials are disputing the results of a new study showing that the city's high schools had the second-worst graduation rate among the nation's 50 largest school systems.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
POTOMAC -- Ben Curtis took down the sign outside the pro shop at Mill Creek Golf Club a year after his first PGA Tour victory, the sign proclaiming the public course that his grandfather built near Columbus, Ohio, as the home of the 2003 British Open champion. "He wanted to get the monkey off his back," Nancy Plant, one of Curtis' aunts and a part owner of the club, said yesterday morning from the clubhouse as she followed her nephew's third round in the Booz Allen Classic on the Internet.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
POTOMAC -- With sparse crowds and a low-profile leader board, the Booz Allen Classic is living up, or down, to its pre-tournament prognosis of an event on its last, shaky legs. But those with a chance to win will be carrying some pretty good story lines, not to mention recent struggles, into the weekend at the Tournament Players Club at Avenel. Booz Allen Classic Through tomorrow; TPC at Avenel, Potomac; daily tickets start at $40 TV: 3 p.m., chs. 2, 7
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 22, 2006
POTOMAC -- After going to Congressional Country Club in 1980, the Kemper Open became a must-play event on the PGA Tour schedule. Though the move seven years later to the nearby Tournament Players Club at Avenel lessened its popularity among the players, it still seemed to be one of the tour's more stable events. Now it's teetering on extinction. Uncertainty is the dominant theme going into today's opening round of the Booz Allen Classic, the third year under that corporate logo after one year as the short-lived FBR Capital Open.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
The only PGA Tour event in the Washington area will be looking for its fourth title sponsor in the past six years after the conclusion of the 2006 Booz Allen Classic in June. Ralph Shrader, the CEO of Booz Allen Hamilton, said yesterday that his company will not renew the contract it signed in 2004 as the title sponsor because the event was moved by the PGA Tour from its traditional early summer date to what his company viewed to be a less favorable fall spot beginning next year. "When the tour made its decision about how it was going to lay out its schedule for 2007 and beyond, and gave us a date in the fall, we felt that that actually changed the dynamics significantly for us and that really did not give us the opportunity to have the kind of world-class event that we were seeking," Shrader said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
There will be a different feel this week to the Washington, D.C., area's only PGA Tour stop. It will seem like the old days, when the Booz Allen Classic was still called the Kemper Open and when the game's biggest names used to show up at Congressional Country Club with the same regularity as the cherry blossoms along the Tidal Basin. That's because the tournament, which begins tomorrow and runs through Sunday, will be played at the venerable Bethesda club for the first time since 1986.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
BETHESDA -- Much of the hoopla at this week's Booz Allen Classic at Congressional Country Club has centered on a field that boasts four of the top five golfers in the world: Vijay Singh, Ernie Els, Phil Mickelson and Retief Goosen. Adam Scott is ranked eighth and is the tournament's defending champion. At 6 feet, 170 pounds, he has the kind of good looks a Hollywood producer would drool over and the manners to sway any future father-in-law. But the 24-year-old Australian has been getting little buzz from fans and the media.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
POTOMAC -- With sparse crowds and a low-profile leader board, the Booz Allen Classic is living up, or down, to its pre-tournament prognosis of an event on its last, shaky legs. But those with a chance to win will be carrying some pretty good story lines, not to mention recent struggles, into the weekend at the Tournament Players Club at Avenel. Booz Allen Classic Through tomorrow; TPC at Avenel, Potomac; daily tickets start at $40 TV: 3 p.m., chs. 2, 7
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
BETHESDA -- Much of the hoopla at this week's Booz Allen Classic at Congressional Country Club has centered on a field that boasts four of the top five golfers in the world: Vijay Singh, Ernie Els, Phil Mickelson and Retief Goosen. Adam Scott is ranked eighth and is the tournament's defending champion. At 6 feet, 170 pounds, he has the kind of good looks a Hollywood producer would drool over and the manners to sway any future father-in-law. But the 24-year-old Australian has been getting little buzz from fans and the media.
SPORTS
By Daniel Lyght and Daniel Lyght,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2004
POTOMAC -- It was lonely at the top for Adam Scott yesterday at the Booz Allen Classic. Coming into the final round at the Tournament Players Club at Avenel, he was six strokes ahead of the closest man -- a margin that seemed insurmountable given Scott's excellent play. Scott followed through with a 3-under-par performance, leaving the rest scrambling for second place. Five players stood log-jammed between 12- and 8-under par as the round unfolded. One of those, the favorite if anyone was to catch Scott, was his friend Charles Howell III. With a five-hole stretch of birdies on the back nine, Howell piqued the interest of those in attendance, pulling within two shots of Scott at No. 15. Those birdies in the end were nothing more than his ticket to second place and a $518,400 check.
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