Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBootleg
IN THE NEWS

Bootleg

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1997
The owners of Record & Tape Traders have been charged with possession of bootleg compact discs -- a year after authorities seized thousands of recordings in raids at the music chain's warehouse and four of its suburban Baltimore stores.Compact discs seized during the raids included unauthorized recordings of concerts by top-selling artists such as Bruce Springsteen, Van Halen and the Who, according to charging documents filed against the company and its owners.Current and former employees told investigators that the owners knew that the illegal recordings were being sold through the stores and through Yodelin' Pig, their mail- and telephone-order business, according to the documents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
The next Ravens season is seven months away, but we already have a frontrunner for buzzword of 2014. Bootleg. Bootleg. Bootleg. Bootleg. Two days after the Ravens hired former Houston Texans coach Gary Kubiak to be their next offensive coordinator, it appears that a number of national analysts, some more reputable than others when it comes to the NFL, are talking about whether Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco is capable of thriving in Kubiak's...
Advertisement
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 1, 1997
Baltimore police reported the arrests of three men Saturday and the seizure of bootleg movie videotapes and counterfeit brand-name merchandise.Agent Ragina L. Cooper, a city police spokeswoman, said the arrests resulted from an investigation into distribution and sales of bootleg videos in cooperation with the Motion Picture Association.Police had received information on a shipment coming to Baltimore, including the description of the vehicle -- a 1997 GMC Jimmy truck -- and its driver. The vehicle was stopped in the 5900 block of Frankford Ave.Seized were 250 bootleg videotapes, including such current releases as "Copland," "Spawn," "Absolute Power" and "Men in Black," and counterfeit clothing, accessories and watches.
EXPLORE
March 26, 2012
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, March 29, 1962: Twenty-one hundred gallons of mash, dozens of empty 100-pound sugar bags and an undisclosed amount of moonshine whiskey were confiscated by officials in a raid on a farm near Abingdon. The still, in a one-story, 30-by-20 foot cinder block house adjoining the main house, was one of the largest ever found in Maryland. Most of the bootleg whiskey was being manufactured in Harford County but was being sold in Baltimore County.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 27, 1991
In 1969, a mysterious double album began to crop up in Los Angeles record shops. Although it didn't say so on the cover or label -- it didn't say anything, in fact -- its 28 selections were clearly the work of Bob Dylan.Even more obvious, however, was that this wasn't the new Dylan album. If anything, it was the opposite, a clandestine compilation of outtakes, demos and casual recordings that had been cobbled together without the singer's knowledge or consent. Dubbed "The Great White Wonder," it was an immediate success; and with that, the bootleg record business was born.
BUSINESS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1996
To the owners of Record & Tape Traders, it was only rock 'n' roll.But they liked it, and they sold it. Hot bands like R.E.M. and Nirvana, captured live on the bootleg compact discs that are prized by hard-core fans and collectors.Now the chain of Baltimore-area record stores has been swept into a nationwide crackdown on illegal recordings, and the two owners could be dancin' to the Jailhouse Rock."It was a cool thing to us. It was a cool thing to our customers," said one owner, Steven Smolen, explaining why he sold the unauthorized concert recordings -- despite having been placed on probation for similar charges in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dawn Chmielewski and Dawn Chmielewski,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 6, 2002
The release of the summer's first blockbuster movies has sparked an unprecedented frenzy of film piracy, sending nearly 10 million people online to download bootleg copies of Spider-Man or Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones. Even as box-office sales soar - with the top 12 movies grossing a record $193 million over the four-day Memorial Day weekend - Internet film piracy is growing even faster, according to a new report from Viant, a Boston-based digital research and consulting firm.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 13, 1998
Ours is such a jaded era.As much as we might complain about declining standards and compromised morality, the truth is, we just aren't as easily outraged as people used to be. These days, the only way a pop concert can generate controversy is if the artist in question does something truly outrageous onstage -- tortures animals, has unprotected sex, calls forth Satan or the like.There was a time, though, when people would object to an artist's performance on strictly musical terms. It didn't happen often, but there were occasions when an audience would decide that a performance was too raw, too rhythmic or too electrified and would respond by hissing, heckling or walking out.In other words, they'd react the way the crowd does to Bob Dylan on "Live 1966: The 'Royal Albert Hall' Concert" (Columbia Legacy 65759)
NEWS
By Vikki Valentine and Vikki Valentine,Contributing Writer | July 17, 1995
Often blamed for tearing up trails, frightening horses and running down hikers, mountain bikers at Patapsco State Valley Park are trying to shed their bully image by taking up the cause of trail maintenance.Under a campaign launched by Assistant Park Manager Gary Burnett last year, the mountain bikers are trying to put back into the trails a little of what their rough-and-ready sport takes out."I ride about 70 miles a week here, I figure I owe it," David McSpade, 20, said of his decision to dedicate a recent hot Saturday afternoon to moving logs and digging trenches.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2007
They survived disco and rap, pop and grunge, over-coiffed boy bands and over-hyped divas. They stood strong through the shift from vinyl to disc and eight-track to cassette. They weathered criminal charges for selling bootleg recordings a decade ago and put spending money in college kids' pockets by buying - then reselling - used music, movies and games. But Kevin Stander and Steven Smolen, who founded Record & Tape Traders 30 years ago in a Towson house, couldn't survive digital. Internet killed the record store.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2007
They survived disco and rap, pop and grunge, over-coiffed boy bands and over-hyped divas. They stood strong through the shift from vinyl to disc and eight-track to cassette. They weathered criminal charges for selling bootleg recordings a decade ago and put spending money in college kids' pockets by buying - then reselling - used music, movies and games. But Kevin Stander and Steven Smolen, who founded Record & Tape Traders 30 years ago in a Towson house, couldn't survive digital. Internet killed the record store.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | November 2, 2007
Walters Art Museum bigwigs know perfectly well how things turned out for Geraldo Rivera and Al Capone's vault, thank you very much. But they're plowing ahead anyway with a plan to let the public in tonight as they break open two recently discovered wooden crates belonging to museum founder Henry Walters. The Baltimore industrialist died in 1931, leaving his city 22,000 pieces of art - plus two wooden crates that somehow escaped notice until now. Secured with heavy padlocks and bearing the initials "H.W.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and Sam Sessa and David Zurawik and Sam Sessa,Sun reporters | October 18, 2006
In a season when new technology is drastically changing the ways in which television networks try to reach viewers, The Wire, HBO's Baltimore-based drama, has found a new and avid audience in East Coast nightclubs and on online auction sites such as eBay and Craigslist. There is, however, one problem with the gain: These new viewers are watching bootleg DVDs or illegal downloads of the entire season, often sold at a fraction of what it would cost to subscribe to HBO or buy a DVD of a full season of the Peabody Award-winning drama.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2005
Hello Bal-tee-more, hello Bal-tee-more," says the 26-year-old lead singer for the Rolling Stones. "You know," Mick Jagger continues, "it's getting very boring, because I'm the only one trying to dance."
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
Jon Routson filmed Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. He filmed E.T. He filmed The Passion of the Christ and Kill Bill, Volumes 1 and 2. By his count, he has shot upward of 80 movies. And each time, he did it with a camcorder he secreted into movie theaters around Baltimore, often on the day of each film's opening. Routson, though, is no video pirate, if by that you think of someone making bootleg copies of movies to sell on the streets of New York or to dump onto the Internet. Routson made his bootleg videos for art. Really.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to hear a modern bootlegging case from Maryland that raises the question of what role U.S. courts should play in helping to enforce the tax laws of other countries. The case involves three New York men convicted in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on wire fraud charges in a liquor smuggling operation that stretched from Maryland to Canada and cost the Canadian authorities millions in lost excise duties. At issue in the men's appeal of their 2001 convictions is a centuries-old common law, known as the revenue rule, which prohibits one country from enforcing in its courts the tax laws of another country.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2005
Hello Bal-tee-more, hello Bal-tee-more," says the 26-year-old lead singer for the Rolling Stones. "You know," Mick Jagger continues, "it's getting very boring, because I'm the only one trying to dance."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 8, 2003
If you found yourself lost in the sonic richness of those early Luther Vandross albums -- Never Too Much, Forever, For Always, For Love, The Night I Fell in Love and others -- then you felt Marcus Miller. That's right. You felt the man as his thick, rumbling, liquid bass lines buoyed the strings, the horns and Vandross' wondrous voice. For 20 years, Miller was an integral part of his friend's formula. "Luther and I would be in the studio mixing those records," Miller remembers, "and he would be turning up his vocals, and I'm on the other end, turning up the bass.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 2003
MOSCOW - Bootleg loggers might seem to have no interest in seeing forests burn. But in Russia, they might. As Siberia and the Russian Far East endure an unusually severe wildfire season, authorities right up to President Vladimir V. Putin contend that in many cases the blazes were set by timber poachers to aid or hide their thievery. Unusually dry spring weather also contributed to the thousands of fires, which began in April and have devastated widely scattered areas totaling more than 6,600 square miles, including about 5,000 square miles of forest, according to the Emergency Situations Ministry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 8, 2003
If you found yourself lost in the sonic richness of those early Luther Vandross albums -- Never Too Much, Forever, For Always, For Love, The Night I Fell in Love and others -- then you felt Marcus Miller. That's right. You felt the man as his thick, rumbling, liquid bass lines buoyed the strings, the horns and Vandross' wondrous voice. For 20 years, Miller was an integral part of his friend's formula. "Luther and I would be in the studio mixing those records," Miller remembers, "and he would be turning up his vocals, and I'm on the other end, turning up the bass.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.