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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Harford County's most notorious native son has been exhumed theatrically. "The Booth Project," an experimental work about Lincoln's assassin premiering this week at the Theatre Project , is the brainchild of Baltimore native Ryan Clark. So is the company performing it - Quarry Theatre Clark returned to the area about three years ago from New York City, where he held posts with a theater company and a performing arts high school. He has been teaching at Harford Community College and Towson University, and will soon join the faculty at the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County.
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SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
The approach Phil Booth Sr. took in teaching his son the game of basketball could best be described as a trial-by-fire method. Booth would drive his elementary school-aged son to various Baltimore County basketball courts, and then let Phil Jr. fend for himself. “He was playing against a lot of older guys,” Booth said. “[I'd] drop him off at the playground and let him go play. Let him take his lumps. That's the way I came up. Go let him play pickup. That's how you gain your instincts.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Four years into his major league career, Jim Palmer had gone from being a 19-year-old phenom to a World Series hero who outpitched Sandy Koufax before his 21st birthday to a sore-armed 23-year old trying to figure out a suddenly clouded future. Sidelined after tearing his rotator cuff, Palmer took classes at Towson State. He earned his license to sell insurance. He even planned to stay active in baseball if he couldn't pitch again. "I thought I was going to become a coach," Palmer recalled.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
I have been putting off this post for a couple of weeks. It's about Mike Bordick's performance on MASN as an analyst on Orioles games. It started with a colleague, who is usually a keen observer of sports media, casually stopping me in the newsroom to say, "Z, you gotta write about Bordick. " As he said it, he shook his head side to side, winced and gestured with two thumbs down. So, I started watching and listening to the likable former Orioles shortstop. Instead of jumping into print with what I saw after a couple of games though, I also started asking other media types who watch a lot of Orioles baseball about their impressions of him. Representative of what I mainly heard was this: "Geez, Z, you're not going to rip Bordick, are you?
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 14, 2012
Sometimes less is more, more or less. Sometimes, less is all you have and all you have will do just fine. Sometimes, the small things, the short things, the bits and pieces are worth keeping because they might be one day useful; my father felt that way about stove bolts. Walter Hard, a Vermont folk poet of Robert Frost's generation, once told of the frugal Yankee woman - was there any other kind? - who left a bag in her attic labeled, "Pieces of string too short to use. " So, alrighty then, that's my preamble and I'm going with it. Here, forthwith, are pieces of column too short to use ... • Suggestion for the Baltimore merchants who oppose Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposal to increase the city's bottle tax to five cents to pay for school renovations: Turn what you see as a problem into an opportunity.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2012
Sophomore guard Phil Booth scored 10 of his team-high 19 points in the third quarter and added a last-minute blocked shot as No. 5 Mount St. Joseph fended off Archbishop Spalding, 54-49, in the Baltimore Catholic League semfinals at Stevenson University. Junior guard Kameron Williams added 13 points and Phil Lawrence provided 12 as the Gaels' balance offset a 29-point effort from Spalding senior guard Greg Brown. Mount St. Joseph improved to 26-6 on the season and will seek the program's fourth BCL championship Sunday.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2012
Once you got past the pre-game show and the outrageous attempt by CBS Sports to use the telecast to try to rehabilitate the reputation of Detroit Lions stomper Ndamukong Suh, TV coverage of the Baltimore Ravens 20-13 victory over the Houston Texans wasn't too bad at all Sunday.  More in a minute on the maddening decision by CBS to bring Suh into the studio. But first the game - a happier topic. Just as some players and teams do, the CBS Sports crew covering the Ravens clearly raised its game to a new level for the playoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
This is what Fox Sports pays Brian Billick to do -- and he does it as well as anyone in any TV booth on the NFL. Near the end of the third quarter with momentum back on their side, the Ravens were driving down the field, and they were doing it by throwing to Anquan Boldin down the sideline at will. As the Ravens quickly lined up in their no-huddle offense after another completion to Boldin, Billick said what the Cardinals needed to do immediately was switch rookie cornerback Patrick Peterson into man-on-man coverage on Boldin -- no matter where the Ravens receiver lined up on the field.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 18, 2011
Men's college lacrosse Hopkins in Face-Off, Big City tripleheaders Johns Hopkins will play UMBC on March 12 at 4 p.m. at M&T Bank Stadium in the Konica Minolta Face-Off Classic, a tripleheader that also features NCAA defending champion Virginia against Cornell at 1:30 p.m. and Princeton against North Carolina at 11 a.m. Hopkins also will play in the Konica Minolta Big City Classic on April 1 at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J.,...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 4, 2011
Dinah K. Faber, a writer, photographer and historian who was known as "the Booth Lady" for her preservation work on Tudor Hall, the Harford County home of the famous Booth family, died Sunday of colon cancer at her Colby, Kan., home. She was 62. The daughter of farmers, Dinah K. Faber was born and raised in Colby and graduated in 1967 from Brewster High School. She earned a degree in anthropology from Kansas State University and a master's degree in English in 1980 from the University of Arkansas.
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