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NEWS
April 17, 1992
A subcommittee looking at the Boomtown strip across from Fort Meade -- now called North Odenton -- is recommending widening Route 175 to five or six lanes, complete with a landscaped median, on-street parking, sidewalks and pedestrian overpasses.The group also is suggesting that buildings along the road be rehabilitated and overhead utility wires be moved to the rear of properties.The recommendations will now be considered by the Odenton Growth Management Committee, which will recommend an overall plan for a new community design.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | December 17, 2008
A month after four men were shot, two fatally, in the parking lot of an Odenton bar, Anne Arundel County officials walked along the troubled strip nearby, noting broken fences, piles of trash and improperly placed signs. "These so-called 'nuisance crimes,' if they're not attended to they can be a bridge to more serious crime," Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold said yesterday. Officials with the Health Department, the Planning and Zoning Department and the police accompanied the county executive on a tour of the area.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | October 28, 1990
The Army sergeant said he'd rather be back in Korea. For now, Bill's Lounge on the Boomtown strip would have to do.The sergeant -- recently transferred from South Korea to Fort Meade -- sat at the bar shortly after midnight on a Saturday. He talked with a Korean waitress as Korean video discs played on two televisions, one at each end of the bar. He ate sushimi ordered from the Korean restaurant next door.After midnight, Korean patrons streamed into Bill's. The place filled with cigarette smoke, Korean chatter and nostalgia for the homeland.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | November 22, 2008
Across from the precisely manicured lawns of Fort Meade stands a row of boarded-up businesses, tattoo shops, an adult bookstore and some faded bars. Once a bunch of bustling bars and arcades earned the area across from the military base the nickname Boomtown. But while nearby communities have blossomed in recent decades, Boomtown has fallen into decay. The shooting of four men, two fatally, early Sunday morning in a parking lot here is only more evidence, neighbors say, that many businesses and abandoned properties have become magnets for criminals.
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | July 11, 1993
Jackie Clark works so hard that I want to stand out in the middle of Route 175 and wave the cars into her little soul-food restaurant.More than that, I wish I could transport her rented storefront out of Boomtown in western Anne Arundel County, away from the liquor stores and loiterers and the memories of massage parlors and adult bookstores.Boomtown has changed for the better in recent years.Its bawdiest, sleaziest tenants are gone, thanks to changes at Fort George G. Meade. The thousands of soldiers who used to inhabit the post and patronize the strip's tawdry shops are being replaced by government bureaucrats.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | December 17, 2008
A month after four men were shot, two fatally, in the parking lot of an Odenton bar, Anne Arundel County officials walked along the troubled strip nearby, noting broken fences, piles of trash and improperly placed signs. "These so-called 'nuisance crimes,' if they're not attended to they can be a bridge to more serious crime," Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold said yesterday. Officials with the Health Department, the Planning and Zoning Department and the police accompanied the county executive on a tour of the area.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 28, 2002
The pilot for NBC's Boomtoom would deserve a full-blown critical rave if for no other reason than the brilliant way creator Graham Yost advances the craft of storytelling in the genre of network cop drama. While there is no shortage of narrative theorists who talk about detective fiction as being most successful when it is like a puzzle, no one on network television has ever managed to create a series that could make viewers feel as if they were actually putting together a puzzle piece by piece as they watched.
NEWS
July 1, 1993
The business owners along Odenton's Boomtown strip would prefer that you not call it that any more. It's "North Odenton," thank you.The trouble is, virtually nothing besides the name has changed. This stretch of Route 175 remains as gritty and shopworn as ever, a tired-looking conglomeration of fast-food joints, bars, cleaning businesses and convenience stores. Boomtown business owners were hugely insulted when Odenton activist Col. Alfred Shehab joked that the strip should be "bulldozed," but let's be honest: a lot of people truly wish someone would bulldoze it and start from scratch.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | June 23, 1993
Thirty business owners are petitioning County Executive Robert R. Neall to oust the chairman of a committee working to design a new Odenton over his comments about "bulldozing" the Boomtown strip.The group said Alfred A. Shehab's comment "degraded" the neighborhood, once known for bawdy peep shows and massage parlors. Community leaders are trying to revitalize the strip under the name "North Odenton.""I suggest to you that anyone with such a narrow-minded attitude about change should not be sitting on a committee trying to bring about these changes," the letter addressed to Mr. Neall says.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2003
For 27 years, nothing stopped Jimmy Eng from serving juicy Shinto chicken and lo mein to hungry Army regulars on Route 175's Boomtown strip across from Fort Meade. His Pagoda House survived military force reductions. It outlasted the dingy taverns and porn shops, the strip's sporadic fires, the lawlessness and the reign of fast food. It hung on long after the pawnshop and Chinese restaurant on either side closed, making Pagoda House the only open business on a boarded-up block. But after Fort Meade became a restricted post in August 2001, Eng's customers stopped coming.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | March 4, 2007
When she envisioned a deluxe newsstand, the kind of place to find glossy magazines in dozens of languages, obscure literary journals and fashion quarterlies that cost as much as $90, Christina Cieri thought of only one location. Harbor East. "If I couldn't do it here, I didn't want to do it," the Harbor News owner says. "Do you see it in Federal Hill? In Mount Vernon? In Fells Point? In Canton? I don't." She felt this neighborhood's promise and wanted a part of it. Here, she says, "it's all about the future."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | September 7, 2006
This Saturday, Pigtown's proud, snouty namesakes will take to the street. More than a dozen oinkers will plod down Washington Boulevard twice that day, as part of the annual Pigtown Festival. It's a chance for the neighborhood to revel in its past - when pigs were driven down the roads to the slaughterhouses - and exhibit its growing development. This year, the festival outgrew its former venue on McHenry Street, and organizers moved it to the 700-900 blocks of Washington Blvd. "We felt that it would be appropriate that we move the festival to kind of the natural point of convergence for Pigtown, which is Washington Boulevard, which is the neighborhood's main street," said Jack Danna, the director of Pigtown Main Street, the organization that presents the festival.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2003
For 27 years, nothing stopped Jimmy Eng from serving juicy Shinto chicken and lo mein to hungry Army regulars on Route 175's Boomtown strip across from Fort Meade. His Pagoda House survived military force reductions. It outlasted the dingy taverns and porn shops, the strip's sporadic fires, the lawlessness and the reign of fast food. It hung on long after the pawnshop and Chinese restaurant on either side closed, making Pagoda House the only open business on a boarded-up block. But after Fort Meade became a restricted post in August 2001, Eng's customers stopped coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | October 27, 2002
With the season premiere of Fox's 24 coming Tuesday, and the announcement last week by NBC that it has given its celebrated new cop drama, Boomtown, the green light for a full year of 22 episodes, this is a good time to try to fine-tune conventional wisdom about the state of prime-time network television. As part of the critical chorus that has been relentlessly lamenting the sorry state of most new network series this fall, I feel a responsibility to get out what might seem a counterintuitive message: Overall, prime-time network television is not as bad as you might think.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 28, 2002
The pilot for NBC's Boomtoom would deserve a full-blown critical rave if for no other reason than the brilliant way creator Graham Yost advances the craft of storytelling in the genre of network cop drama. While there is no shortage of narrative theorists who talk about detective fiction as being most successful when it is like a puzzle, no one on network television has ever managed to create a series that could make viewers feel as if they were actually putting together a puzzle piece by piece as they watched.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Storm and Jonathan Storm,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 21, 2002
PASADENA, Calif. - The major broadcast networks began their presentations Monday at the Television Critics Association's annual summer press tour. They were facing a tough audience anxious about the economy and terrorism but more deeply disappointed by the mediocre new programs coming in the fall. Mediocre and thuddingly familiar. "Everything seems like a repeat," said Bill Goodykoontz of the Arizona Republic. He was referring to a slate of new shows that has been unanimously branded as uninspired, but he could have been riffing on the event itself, arranged mutually by the critics and the networks as the most efficient mass method for interviewing stars and executives.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | November 22, 2008
Across from the precisely manicured lawns of Fort Meade stands a row of boarded-up businesses, tattoo shops, an adult bookstore and some faded bars. Once a bunch of bustling bars and arcades earned the area across from the military base the nickname Boomtown. But while nearby communities have blossomed in recent decades, Boomtown has fallen into decay. The shooting of four men, two fatally, early Sunday morning in a parking lot here is only more evidence, neighbors say, that many businesses and abandoned properties have become magnets for criminals.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1997
The bars, brothels and tattoo parlors that once dominated Boomtown, the Route 175 business strip, have given way to family restaurants, insurance companies and a less colorful moniker, North Odenton.As Fort Meade has been transformed from troop training post into a military campus and office park, business owners and county planners are talking again about cleaning up Boomtown -- this time by creating a pedestrian-friendly, villagelike cluster of businesses to go along with the changes on the base.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1997
The bars, brothels and tattoo parlors that once dominated Boomtown, the Route 175 business strip, have given way to family restaurants, insurance companies and a less colorful moniker, North Odenton.As Fort Meade has been transformed from troop training post into a military campus and office park, business owners and county planners are talking again about cleaning up Boomtown -- this time by creating a pedestrian-friendly, villagelike cluster of businesses to go along with the changes on the base.
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