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NEWS
March 25, 2013
While I am in complete agreement with Allen St. Pierre of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws as to the desirability of reducing penalties for marijuana possession, I take issue with his physics ("Advocates for legal marijuana take first steps," March 20). He states that "the fulcrum on all of this [liberalization of marijuana laws] rests on the baby boomers. " I would say, more accurately, that the baby boomers are the fulcrum. We remember, of course, that a fulcrum is a stationary pivot point upon which a lever rests, and against which it exerts force to create movement.
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NEWS
By Sheldon Caplis and Diane Bell McKoy | June 9, 2014
America is facing three pivotal points in its history: a workforce vacated by Baby Boomer retirements, a lack of teachers to prepare youth for college and give them the skills required for new and global economies, and a swiftly changing racial demographic (becoming "majority-minority" before the end of this decade). How we navigate these issues is critical. They impact whether we as a state will be able to meet our leadership and workforce needs and whether we will have teachers with the skills and cultural understanding of the communities they serve, which include a growing population of children of color and those living in under-resourced areas.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 16, 2012
All baby boomers should get tested for hepatitis C, the virus that can lead to liver disease, cancer and death, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . One in 30 boomers is infected and most don't know -- read about that in this Sun's story on hep C . In making the recommendation, CDC officials believe raising awareness and testing will avert more disease and deaths. It's now the fastest-rising cause of cancer-related deaths and a leading cause of liver transplants.)
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
A popular living choice for retiring baby boomers is fast becoming what's known as "55-plus" communities. Such an option is found in a lovely Colonial-style home in the pet-friendly Highland Woods development, just minutes from Main Street in Annapolis, at 714 Darlow Drive. Priced at $539,000, this two-story, vinyl-sided home with a basement is one of just 25 built in the suburban neighborhood and faces a community park. "I like the home's open floor plan that some people call the 'open concept,'" said listing agent Wilma Richards with Long and Foster Real Estate's Annapolis office.
EXPLORE
August 18, 2011
The people who run senior centers are finding that the baby boomers who are beginning to populate them don't want bingo, they want belly dancing (see our Page 1 story). These aging boomers are less inclined than their parents were to pull up stakes and move to Florida, or even into nearby retirement housing. They want to stay right where they are, in the homes they know, and local officials have sharpened their focus on ways to help them achieve that goal. Observing the determination of this new segment of the senior population to stay put and to keep doing physical things instead of shuffling off to some warm corner to await the inevitable quietly, the cynic might say it's a result of denial: The people who came of age in the don't-trust-anyone-over-30 culture of the 1960s are vainly clinging to their youth.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | March 9, 2011
My generation, the baby boomers, reinvented jeans, sex and parenting, so it is no surprise that as we age, we are putting a new spin that, too. This was never going to go smoothly. Aging, I mean. Boomers are so reluctant to acknowledge, much less adapt to, even the tiniest erosions of time that we will drive the health care system off the cliff in our pursuit of eternal youth. And since boomers love to talk about themselves, we are writing about aging, too. Judith Viorst, the children's book author our children loved, has turned writing about aging into a modest franchise.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance | August 6, 2003
It's a bummer, man. Millions of baby boomers, raised on rock 'n' roll and once the drivers of America's youth culture, have finally been tossed in with their aged parents. They're now part of the U.S. Census Bureau's "older population," meaning everyone age 55 and up. The post-World War II baby boom arrived between 1946 and 1964, and the oldest of them are turning 57 this year. That puts many of them squarely in the bureau's first category of elders, between ages 55 and 64 -- the "near old."
NEWS
By Jim Castelli | November 6, 1990
AMERICAN RELIGIOUS leaders have been fascinated with the Baby Boom generation -- and with good reason.First of all, Boomers make up one-third of the whole population. When they were younger, their parents flocked to churches and synagogues to provide religious education for their children.As the Boomers grew up, however, they left the church in large numbers. They were particularly responsible for the membership declines in mainline Protestant denominations since the '60s.For more than a decade, religious leaders have been looking to the Boomers to return to church.
NEWS
May 1, 1994
The trustees of the Social Security Administration really started something with their recent warning that the system could run out of money in 2029, seven years earlier than projected only a year ago. For fortysomething Baby Boomers, loudly worried about their Golden Years, this sounds a warning for their middle-Seventies. For twentysomething Baby Busters, this enlarges alarums that there may be nothing left at the trough when they retire. As for real single-digit Babies, we're talking about their whole financial future.
NEWS
By KATE SANTICH and KATE SANTICH,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 16, 2006
The same generation that gave us granola, the running boom and Viagra is now focusing its fitness concerns on a new region - the brain. As the first of the baby boomers celebrate their 60th birthdays, many are starting to worry about preserving not only their physical health but their mental agility, too. "We're seeing a sort of memory-fitness movement," says Dr. Gary Small, director of the University of California, Los Angeles Center on Aging and...
NEWS
By Douglas A. Beigel | April 22, 2014
A health care crisis is quietly unfolding in our nation's laboratories. This crisis has developed largely off the public's radar screen. If not resolved, it can adversely impact the lives of every American. The crisis in question: alarming shortages within the laboratory workforce. Lab testing has an estimated impact on over 70 percent of medical decisions. That percentage will grow as baby boomers retire and preventive coverage - including screening tests performed by labs - increases as part of federal health care reform.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Connie Rhodes had an extra incentive to head to North Carolina from Dundalk this holiday season. Three of her grandchildren got married this year, and for their first Christmas with their spouses, "they wanted Grandma there," the 64-year-old said Wednesday as she waited for a train at Penn Station in Baltimore. "It made me feel good," she said, a neat, snowman-embroidered bag at her feet. From now until New Year's Day, nearly 2 million Marylanders are expected to hit the road, catch flights and settle into train cars en route to holiday destinations, about the same number as made trips last year, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 25, 2013
Beverly Jones was my life coach before she was anybody else's life coach. Back at Ohio University, she was a young administrator and I was a reporter on the student newspaper, The Post. We were the rare woman in our jobs, and she talked me in off the ledge many times. Bev went on to Georgetown Law School and eventually worked as a lobbyist on Capital Hill. A golden parachute allowed her to re-invent herself as an executive coach, helping professionals figure out where they, like her, will be next.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
I am a member of the baby oil generation. Half a century ago, we spent our summers at the pool, slick with a kind of fluid magnifying glass that turned our skin red, then brown. You wouldn't have been caught dead without a suntan back in the day. And you were in a hurry to get it done so you would spend the rest of the summer glowing in your sundresses and your two-piece bathing suits. There was an art to "laying out," as we called it. We were so focused on rotating our exposure to the sun - like rotisserie chickens on a spit - that we barely paid attention to the boys.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 22, 2013
We baby boomers get blamed for just about every economic hiccup, because there are so many of us. And our children are particularly furious because they believe the crisis in Social Security, which may affect their ability to retire, can be laid at our feet like kindling for a burning at the stake. They are convinced we boomers, with our outsized appetites and sense of entitlement, are going to consume everything on our way to the cemetery, right down to the amount of ground we leave for those who die after us. But data from the Social Security Administration itself, provided by chief actuary Stephen Goss, demonstrates that boomers are not the pig-through-the-python that we have been described as being.
NEWS
By Stephen H. Morgan | March 27, 2013
When economic times are tough and the daily headlines remind us of our nation's deficit challenge, it's easy to use misinformation and anecdotes of abuse to demonize certain entitlement programs. Unfortunately, this has the unintended effect of stereotyping whole groups of people as lazy, unmotivated or, worse yet, committing intentional fraud. First, it was those living on the edge of poverty and relying on Medicaid for health care and other critical support services who took the hit. Now it's the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 4, 1994
Driving home the other day, listening to the radio I heard a reference to the "key demographic marketing group, the 25 through 52s."Hmm, I thought, not bad.Ten minutes later I heard reference to the same group, only now it was "the 25 through 54s."Even better: The "key group" had matured two more years in 600 seconds. The baby boom -- epicenter of popular culture all these years -- is aging fast.We see that phenomenon reflected in coming movies, which tend to stress family values, togetherness, less risque (and risky)
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 23, 2010
The Wall Street Journal reports that baby boomers have not emerged from the fetal position they assumed in 2008, when they found their homes and their retirement funds suddenly to be worth half as much. We boomers stopped spending — we haven't opened our wallets since — and because boomers represent such a huge chunk of the American population, that's bad news for an economy powered by consumer spending. Our plans for retirement were already in trouble because we hadn't saved enough during our working lives, and the stock market collapse made the future that much more troubling.
NEWS
March 25, 2013
While I am in complete agreement with Allen St. Pierre of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws as to the desirability of reducing penalties for marijuana possession, I take issue with his physics ("Advocates for legal marijuana take first steps," March 20). He states that "the fulcrum on all of this [liberalization of marijuana laws] rests on the baby boomers. " I would say, more accurately, that the baby boomers are the fulcrum. We remember, of course, that a fulcrum is a stationary pivot point upon which a lever rests, and against which it exerts force to create movement.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | February 27, 2013
I was born in 1946, just when the boomer wave began. Bill Clinton was born that year, too. So was George W. Bush, as was Laura Bush. And then the next year, Hillary Rodham. And soon Newt Gingrich (known as "Newty" as a boy). And, also in 1946, Cher. (Every time I begin feeling old, I remind myself she's slightly older.) Why did so many of us begin coming into the world in 1946? Demographers have given this a great deal of attention, but it's not that complicated. My father, for example, was in World War II -- as were the fathers of many other early boomers.
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