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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 4, 1998
A reader called to tell me that the Boomerang Pub (1110 S. Charles St.) has just started serving lunch. She raved for so long about the chili that I called chef Scott Heckendorn to see what made it so special.It is, he says, a "Texas-style chili," with chunks of lamb, veal and beef - "something like Michael Rork's chili." Heckendorn used to be the maitre d' at Hampton's in Harbor Court when Rork was the chef there. "I always had a culinary degree," he says. "And I got tired working the front of the house."
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NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | July 5, 2012
There were no tornado warnings last Friday night, when I muted the Nationals game around 11 p.m. I listened intently through my living-room window. A train, I thought. Definitely a train. I should have known better. The warnings have been building for many months. We had historically hot temperatures in Washington and Baltimore last summer. Then epic rain and flooding from Tropical Storm Lee in September. Then March temperatures across the U.S. so hot they surpassed normal high temperatures for April in many places.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 21, 1997
Remember that scene in "Crocodile Dundee" where Dundee fixes an authentic Australian meal for the woman (blackened alligator on a spit, yams, grilled slugs) and then says something like, "Actually, that stuff tastes terrible" and opens a can of chili for himself?Well, you won't want to open a can of chili if you try the authentically ethnic food at Boomerang, Baltimore's new Australian pub. But you might want to order instead the Port Philip Bay fillet, a tender piece of beef as big as your fist, topped with fried oysters and a creamy red-pepper sauce.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | April 12, 2012
More young adults are moving back in with their parents than ever before, and if a recent think tank report is correct, both generations are OK with this. The reasons are often economic, of course. Our children can't find jobs that pay enough to allow them to live on their own — and in the style to which they became accustomed under our roofs. But they aren't down about it, according to the Pew Research Center. A significant majority say they are satisfied with their living arrangements and upbeat about the future.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1997
Two Pulaski Highway clubs featuring exotic dancers were shut down a week and fined a total of $750 yesterday by the Baltimore County liquor board for inappropriate conduct, administrative violations and allowing dancers to hustle customers for drinks.Similar charges against a third club in Rosedale were postponed after its attorney, Republican state Sen. F. Vernon Boozer, asked the board for more time to prepare a defense. Boozer was "escorting Bill Clinton in Annapolis," said Chairman Philip R. Leyhe Jr.The rulings did not please leaders of about 200 residents and clergy who packed a Towson hearing room to protest the clubs called Boomerang, Shakers and Backsides.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2000
WASHINGTON -- An international team of astronomers has captured what are described as the first detailed pictures of our universe in its infancy -- just a few hundred thousand years after the Big Bang, before the formation of the first stars and galaxies. The cosmic baby photos look something like slices of a blurry cheese pizza. But they are delighting scientists because they appear to support promising theories about the early physics of the universe and the mechanisms that led to the birth of stars and galaxies like our own. The images -- snapped by a telescope hung beneath a balloon over Antarctica -- also appear to resolve a fundamental question raised by Albert Einstein about whether space is "curved" or "flat."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 4, 2003
The on-screen arrival of the Boomerang Generation is not the only trend of the new fall season. While not as widespread, another theme that will be explored in several series involves multi-ethnic households - with an emphasis on the humor of ethnic differences. WB puts the formula center stage in the sitcom Like Family, which features two families - one white and one black - sharing the same small house. The premise has a middle-class African-American family of four opening their doors to a white single mom (Diane Farr)
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1997
Unusual accentsLooking for an off-the-wall wall hanging or a one-of-a-kind decorative plant stand? Try Boomerang Words & Gifts, which specializes in unusual accessories and crafts. Not to be missed are local artist John-Paul's wall hangings, Just Heads -- which are, well, heads made of polymer resin ($35-$55); Kimberly Smith's Clay Quilts wall hangings, composed of six different ceramic panels mounted on a wood frame ($28-$350); and Juanna Penna's copper plant stands shaped like birds, flowers and frogs ($20-$40)
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 13, 1997
It comes to our attention that an exotic dance establishment known as Backsides exists on Pulaski Highway, in Rosedale, Baltimore County, and that your favorite newspaper, unzipping all previous cultural inhibitions, is unafraid to utter its very name.Community standards, we called it in more innocent times, when we kept our editorial lips buttoned. We assumed a kind of maiden-aunt delicacy in such matters. We felt the mere mention of certain traditionally covered parts of the human anatomy was best left to the pages of Grace Metalious, author of "Peyton Place," or the cries of doormen on East Baltimore Street.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone -- she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library in northern Anne Arundel County began.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,sun reporter | October 29, 2006
Jules Verne's character may have strived to make it around the world in 80 days, but the pupils at Hampstead's Spring Garden Elementary School did it in five. Without leaving school grounds, they flew from Australia to West Africa, China to Western Europe, Japan to Mexico, racking up the miles and stickers of parrots, fans and flowers on their unofficial passports - a lanyard around their necks. Along the way, they learned that rojo means red in Spanish, that an African thumb piano looks nothing like the ebony-and-ivory keyed instrument they know, and that eating Cheerios with chopsticks is not as hard as it looks.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone -- she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library in northern Anne Arundel County began.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone - she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library began. As Morgan slung the boomerang over her back, Tessa Fowler, 12, unsheathed her plastic sword and Shawna Phelps, 15, stapled clouds of red fabric to a black cape.
NEWS
February 24, 2006
As President Bush scrambles to cool public outrage at his administration's decision to allow a United Arab Emirates company to manage six American ports, including Baltimore's, it's hard to miss the irony that he is reaping what he sowed. Reaction to the deal from constituents besieging Congress and state lawmakers in Maryland and elsewhere is mostly visceral: anger mixed with fear based on almost no knowledge of the facts involved. That's the same emotional force Mr. Bush and his allies tapped into during the elections of 2002 and 2004, stoking the fears of random violence by Arab terrorists that haunted the hearts of all Americans in the wake of the Sept.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | February 13, 2005
YEARS AGO in Baltimore, a ward leader calls City Hall to say he has someone who needs a job. "What can he do?" the mayor asks. "Nothing," says the leader. "Good," says the mayor. "We won't have to train him." But, of course, a little schooling can be a good thing. It might have saved Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. a bit of embarrassment last week. Mere days after his plea for civility in Maryland politics, the Republican governor had to explain why a political mudslinger was on his payroll.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2004
Gayle Lomax of Columbia figured she had successfully launched her first child from the nest four years ago when her daughter moved to Washington to attend Howard University. But six months ago, her daughter was back home, no longer able to afford her apartment on a part-time job and saddled with more than $5,000 in credit card debt. The 22-year-old has finished school and is working as a waitress while searching for a job in television production. "The prospects aren't really good. She may be home longer than a year or so," said Lomax, a single parent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 3, 1992
MO' MONEYOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack(Perspective 28968 1004)BOOMERANGOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack(LaFace 73008 26006)Directors aren't the only auteurs in the movie business these days. Thanks to the increasing importance of soundtrack albums in movie marketing, record producers have become just as crucial in shaping the feel of a film project as the folks behind the cameras.Just listen to the way Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis' taste sets the tone for the soundtrack to the Damon Wayans film "Mo' Money."
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone - she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library began. As Morgan slung the boomerang over her back, Tessa Fowler, 12, unsheathed her plastic sword and Shawna Phelps, 15, stapled clouds of red fabric to a black cape.
NEWS
By Nathan Bierma | December 7, 2003
CHICAGO - For all that college students have to learn, one of the most important lessons is patience. As recently as the last decade, tossing the mortarboard was anticipated as the moment of freedom from family and the start of an autonomous life. But a sagging job market for graduates - and some longer-term trends, such as swelling tuition costs and a rising marriage age - are postponing such a declaration of independence. In the last Census, more than half of men and over one-third of women ages 18 to 24 lived with one or both of their parents, the highest rate in decades.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 4, 2003
The on-screen arrival of the Boomerang Generation is not the only trend of the new fall season. While not as widespread, another theme that will be explored in several series involves multi-ethnic households - with an emphasis on the humor of ethnic differences. WB puts the formula center stage in the sitcom Like Family, which features two families - one white and one black - sharing the same small house. The premise has a middle-class African-American family of four opening their doors to a white single mom (Diane Farr)
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