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By Matt Vensel | May 25, 2011
When it comes to viral videos, the "boom goes the dynamite" guy was a first-ballot Hall-of-Famer. The video of Brian Collins, then an overwhelmed college sports broadcaster who bombed in epic fashion, has been viewed more than six millions times since it was uploaded to YouTube in 2005. My college buddies and I were probably responsible for at least one million of those hits , and his classic catchphrase -- "and boom goes the dynamite" -- has been a part of my lexicon ever since.
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NEWS
July 31, 2014
The limits of growth has been a constant theme in Towson news over recent years, mostly focusing on major redevelopment downtown. Meanwhile, the same issue is also a sore spot a little farther south - around Towson University. The discomfort over "boom town" expansion felt by residents near Towson's core is shared by residents of Rodgers Forge, which borders TU. The current flash point has been discussion over a proposed $2 million in improvements to a softball field. TU officials say the upgrade is necessary for the university to meet equal facilities requirements under Title IX. Worrisome to Rodgers Forge residents is part of the design that includes an electrical conduit, which they fear could mean the installation of lights in the future - a hot button issue in the suburban enclave.
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NEWS
August 22, 1993
The original proponents of the enterprise zone idea for the United States were inspired by the East Asian economic miracle -- development absolutely unfettered by any regulation or tax. Fortunately, the idea was never accepted in undiluted form here. Thailand is the latest Asian country to be in full-fledged miraculous development, and the Royal Plaza Hotel collapse in a provincial town, with confirmed deaths at more than 100 and growing, is the kind of risk taken.This two-story hotel had four stories added and a seventh under construction when the structure gave way. A reasonable building code and reasonable enforcement would have saved those lives and not impeded real development.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
A chain-link fence marks the edge of Aberdeen Proving Ground, an Army installation where a nationwide base reorganization was supposed to bring so many people and jobs to Harford County that officials worried they would not have the space or resources to meet demand. Inside the fence, an estimated 21,000 people report to work, conducting research in massive new buildings. Shots fire in the distance. Sometimes bombs explode. But outside the fence, gleaming new offices completed in anticipation of economic spillover stand empty, a reminder that any growth that's taken place growth remains tightly contained.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
Brian Schilpp, who has spent his life along Back River, said he was never more proud of that heritage than on Wednesday, when he was overlooking a trash boom filled with waterlogged garbage. Baltimore County installed the heavy-duty vinyl boom last month at a cost of $80,000. The 700-foot-long entrapment device, held in place by seven anchors, has been stationed at the headwaters of the Back River, a waterway often reviled for its foul smells and trash-lined banks. While the boom halts the flow of debris downstream, it also shows how much trash is dumped into area waterways.
NEWS
June 15, 2011
What hypocrites we be! We expound the virtues of shipping millions of tons of coal to stoke the fires of Asia — with a handsome profit to us while abetting Asia's environmental disaster ("Coal exports through port booming," June 12). Yet we revile coal as a means of addressing our energy needs here in the U.S. Seems like an international application of the familiar point of view, "not in my backyard. " Paul Butler, Street
NEWS
March 12, 1991
Census Bureau figures just released show how much the nation's demographics changed in the decade just ending. The "minority" population rose dramatically. In 1990, white Americans of European ancestry were still the nation's dominant group, but at about 75 percent of the nation's population, down considerably from 10 years ago, when that figure was a little over 80 percent. In decades past the proportion was in the high 80s.The big change in the 1980s was brought about by immigration from Asia and Latin America.
NEWS
September 23, 1994
Mount Airy will mark its centennial this weekend, an appropriate time to reflect on the town's history and ponder its future. Like many other small towns, Mount Airy has its share of boom and bust cycles, although boom seems in store for the foreseeable future for this quaint burg near the juncture of Carroll, Howard, Frederick and Montgomery counties.Railroads were the defining force for much of Mount Airy's history, later replaced by the automobile. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad's construction of the Baltimore to Frederick line generated a tremendous spurt of development in the 1830s -- and the town's name as well.
NEWS
By Lawrence Kudlow | June 11, 2004
THE MUCH-MALIGNED factory sector is booming. Not rising. Not improving. Booming. According to new data from the Institute of Supply Management, which tracks the manufacturing sector, new orders, production, order backlogs, export orders and employment were very strong in May. The industrial sector is so strong that the speed of supplier deliveries has hit its highest level since April 1979. This means that firms cannot produce fast enough to meet rising demand, which is why commodity prices continue to climb.
NEWS
By James K. Galbraith | August 17, 1998
THE STOCK sell-off of the past several weeks is no surprise. Newton's Law, the law of averages, the economics of arbitrage and the experience of history all predicted that stocks would fall. Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan himself had called the event inevitable. Only the timing was uncertain -- a qualifier akin to that old question, "aside from that, Mrs. Lincoln, how was the play?"But what does it mean? Is the expansion over? Will there be a bear market? Will there be a crash? Will there be a recession?
NEWS
By Allison Eatough and For The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
At just 24 years old, Ryan Nicotra is changing Harford County's theater scene. The 2007 Bel Air High School graduate is the founder and director of Boom Theatre Co., which produces plays throughout the county. Since 2011, the Bel Air-based group has performed everything from comedy classics like “The Importance of Being Earnest” to Greek tragedies like “Prometheus Bound.” The company is also home to the Brave New Works Theatre Festival, a series of short plays and performances from emerging playwrights.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
A Houston-based company asked Maryland for a permit to ship millions of gallons of crude oil through its South Baltimore marine terminal as the nation's oil industry surges. Another company in the Fairfield industrial area began moving crude oil in recent years from tank cars hauled by locomotives onto barges for shipment to refineries or asphalt plants. While the boom in U.S. crude oil production is helping to reduce the nation's dependence on imports, the rapidly expanding domestic transport of crude by rail and barge is raising concerns after several derailments and explosions and a barge accident that spilled crude into the Mississippi River.
SPORTS
By David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Chris Moneymaker knows the type. The player whose eyes widen when the 2003 World Series of Poker champion brings his chips over to a table. "There's always one guy that, right when I sit down, he perks up and says, "I'm going to bust his [rear end]," Moneymaker says. If that sounds appealing, you have your chance to do just that this weekend in Charles Town, W.Va., where Moneymaker will be playing in a handful events, including Saturday's $1,800-buy-in Hollywood Poker Open regional main event.
TRAVEL
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Michael Maykrantz was on duty at a fire house on 74th street in Ocean City when the floor began to shake and the doors started to rattle. At Bart Rader's house in Ocean Pines, a loud boom “like somebody blew something up” preceded shaking so heavy that it rattled a 50-pound metal sculpture against the wall. Miles away in Annapolis, Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan was meeting in state Sen. James Mathias' office when he got a text message from his daughter: “What the heck was that?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
We almost missed all of the fun. On a recent Saturday night, a friend and I sat idly at the main upstairs bar at Anastasia, the Italian restaurant by Kali's Restaurant Group that replaced Meli in Fells Point last month. There were 20 or so patrons, fragmented into smaller groups, scattered between our area and a second bar by the entrance. An annual Fells Point bar crawl was winding down, and the neighborhood's energy level - noticeably depleted after 12 hours of raging - permeated here, too. After a Heineken ($6)
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Stefanie Trop decided to live in Butchers Hill, a 7-minute walk from the Johns Hopkins medical campus, because all her friends live and work in the city and she didn't want to drive to school. "It's not always the most pleasant walk; it's not very scenic and you can't pick any route you want to," she said. "But it's quick and easy. " Trop is one of a growing number of young professionals and other commuters in Maryland and around the country who are spending less time behind the wheel, according to a study released Thursday by the U.S. PIRG Education Fund.
NEWS
March 26, 1993
A small building boom was expected in Carroll County's Freedom District after the moratorium on sewer hookups was lifted last summer.Two years ago, the county halted hookups until the treatment plant's capacity could be increased from 1.8 million gallons a day to 3.5 million. The moratorium put a brake on growth.The anticipated boom hasn't materialized yet, but county planning officials expect that developers, who have been biding their time during the recession, will begin to build now that interest rates are down and the economy is recovering.
NEWS
July 6, 1996
REMEMBER BOB DOLE'S criticism of Hollywood last year for glamorizing violence and sex? His speech got a huge reaction, unlike anything the senator from Kansas had experienced to that point, according to Bob Woodward's book on the presidential campaign.Hollywood obviously sat up and took notice because its offerings this summer include:An Arnold Schwarzenegger movie in which a lot of people get blown up.A Tom Cruise movie in which a lot of people get blown up.A Nicholas Cage-Sean Connery movie in which a lot of people get blown up.A science-fiction thriller about people and aliens getting blown up.And, for a change of pace, there's a movie featuring Jim Carrey, that $20 million bastion of culture and taste, as a manic stalker.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
To win the two-bedroom Canton condo Jillian Rimmer wanted, she offered to pay $75 more a month than the asking rent of $1,600. It worked: The landlord chose her bid, and she and a roommate live there now. "I was willing to pay that for the great location and parking," said Rimmer, who is in her early 30s and who moved to Baltimore from Columbia. "I had quite a bit of trouble finding a place. Pretty much as soon as a listing went online, it was gone. " Many interested in urban living face the same problem in Baltimore's competitive rental market, in which a limited supply of quality rentals in popular neighborhoods such as Federal Hill, Fells Point and Mount Vernon have tenants scrambling to secure leases.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2013
When Michelle and Matthew Gorra moved to Upper Fells Point four years ago, they saw it not only as an investment in Baltimore's revival but in their own future. Michelle Gorra, a 36-year-old pediatrician, thought hard about that future last week as she drove in circles around the neighborhood. The area had lost power, and the car was the only place she could find for her two young children to nap in air-conditioned peace. "Young couples without children renovate, buy, move in, live three to five years, have children, get frustrated with the infrastructure and everything surrounding the investment they've made, and they move out," she said.
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