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FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 20, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Two weeks ago, Rush Limbaugh and Jimmy Buffett -- pop culture icons, both -- topped the New York Times hardcover best-seller lists. Two weeks ago, Derek Walcott won the Nobel Prize for literature. A famous face or high media profile can obviously be used to jump-start book sales. But does literary acclaim also result in dollars at the bookstore? "It certainly has some impact," said Helene Atwan, associate publisher for Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Ms. Atwan has firsthand experience with the question: FSG publishes both Mr. Walcott and last year's Nobel laureate, Nadine Gordimer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | December 26, 1999
Computer crashes. Chaos. Death. Destruction. Cold and darkness. No toilet paper.00 You're entitled to your choice of 1999/2000 catastrophes.Right now, I'm hoping for a biblical plague. Only locusts can devour the scourge the coming of the year 2000 has already brought: Y2K books, heaps of them.There are guides for the home and the soul, how-tos and how-not-tos, novels, histories, mysteries, prophesies and thrillers. There are angry books and happy books, spiritual books and practical books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Demanski and Laura Demanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 1999
Intuitively, it may seem that the Internet is delivering a catastrophic blow to the cultural currency of books. In some significant ways, this is true. The Web has become a formidable competitor for the leisure time of Americans and a distraction from literary concerns. Web surfing also makes a virtue of dipping in a toe and skipping along to the next entertainment. It discourages the sustained, close attention that literature rewards.At the same time, the World Wide Web is home to a bustling, bristling, companionable, contentious literary community.
SPORTS
By Ryanne Milani, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Suzanne Collins'"The Hunger Games" trilogy has sold millions of copies in the United States since the first book was published in 2008. Now, with the release of the blockbuster movie of the same name, the series has achieved even more: It has influenced kids to spend more time outside. Two weekends ago, 13 young "Hunger Games" fans braved the rain to learn about archery. The Saturday event, which was hosted by the Thurmont Regional Library and run by members of the Tuscarora Archers, allowed the teenagers to learn how to shoot a bow. "[It]
NEWS
By Karen W. Arenson and Karen W. Arenson,New York Times News Service | May 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- Columbia University is double-stacking library books, stashing them in every nook and cranny. Princeton is stowing books out of sequence that could no longer be crammed in where they belonged. And the New York Public Library is projecting that it will run out of space for its research collections by 2003.Throwing out books is not an option. Nor is cutting off acquisitions or finding more contiguous space.So the three institutions -- owners of three of the largest book collections in the New York metropolitan area -- are planning to create a climate-controlled, no-frills library warehouse near Princeton, N.J., where they can send some of their least-used books, periodicals and other items.
NEWS
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 1998
By giving Bill Clinton high marks, in the midst of the Monica Lewinsky furor, most Americans are saying that they care more about a president's public record than his private life. So why isn't this common-sense view reflected in most leading current books on national politics?Instead these books - including recent offerings from leading journalists such as Bob Woodward, Roger Simon, and Michael )) Lewis - profess to present the real people behind the scenes but offer either cynicism or smarminess.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole Mccauley and Mary Carole Mccauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | January 2, 2003
WASHINGTON - The large, extravagant handwriting has more ruffles and curlicues than a Christmas package, and it practically shouts self-confidence: "Thys Boke If Myne." This book is mine. And then he signs it, with a capital "P" for "Prince" so tall and plump that it dwarfs all the other letters on the page - as he seems to have believed that he dwarfed all other mortals. Could any inscription be more revealing? Could it possibly tell us more about the personality of that budding adolescent who later would become England's King Henry VIII?
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | August 15, 1999
"Harry Potter," "Goosebumps," "I Spy," "The Guinness Book of World Records." The staff at the Parkville Public Library glumly recites its list of recommended readings like failed strategies in a losing war. How do you get a grade-school boy to read? Librarians Jean Blair, Beth LaPenotiere and Mercedes Connor would love to know. And this time it's personal: They are the mothers of boys who just say no to books. "My boys are embarrassed for people to think they might be reading a book," says Connor, the mother of three boys, ages 8, 10 and 12. "Card games and Nintendo, those are socially acceptable.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2002
Mary Ella Fizer raced through the door of the library with a scrap of paper in her hand and a book on her mind. It had been just a few minutes since the 58-year-old Pikesville woman had collected a recommendation for the book Peace of Mind from another library patron while waiting for the doors of the Baltimore County Public Library in Pikesville to open. Now she was in a hurry. Fizer wanted that book. She needed that book. As she stood at the library's general information desk one recent morning clutching the paper bearing the name of the 1946 spiritual tome by Joshua L. Liebman and waiting for a librarian to tell her whether it was available, Fizer shifted her weight from foot to foot and leaned on the counter.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
Sometime in the next few days, Gunnery Sgt. Blaine Scott will arrive in Afghanistan for a three-month stint. Around the same time, his two young children, Isabella and Blaine Jr., will get a package addressed especially to them in the mail at their home in California. Before the 18-year veteran of the Marine Corps boarded a plane at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport headed to the Middle Eastern war zone late Tuesday, a cheerful and smiling Scott pored over a selection of brand-new donated books, selecting a mystery for his 7-year-old daughter and a book about trucks for his 4-year-old son. "I haven't seen my kids in forever," Scott said.
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