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NEWS
January 19, 1997
I just read Sherman Alexie's "Indian Killer" I loved it, especially because he mentioned my favorite bookstore. Elliot Bay in Seattle has the best reading series and great brownies.I also just finished "Gone Fishin' ." Oh, I liked that. It's a quick read and I like the two characters Walter Mosley has created.I have two books waiting on my nightstand that I'm looking forward to: "Duchamp" by Calvin Tomkins and "Paris Noir: African Americans in the City of Light" by Tyler Stovall- E. Ethelbert Miller will judge this year's Artscape Literary Arts Award for Poetry.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 9, 2007
Mary-Paulding Martin, a writer, neighborhood activist and former director of Baltimore's Star-Spangled Banner Flag House, died of pneumonia Friday at Roland Park Place. She was 94. Born in Norfolk, Va., and raised in Portsmouth, Va., Mary-Paulding Murdoch was a descendant of Pocahontas and a great-great-great-granddaughter of 19th-century Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall. She earned a bachelor's degree in English from Sweet Briar College in Virginia in 1933 and four years later married architect Hugh McDonald Martin.
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NEWS
January 20, 1995
The Rev. Bert Webb, 88, an assistant general superintendent of the Assemblies of God for 20 years, died Monday in Springfield, Mo., after a brief illness.Migel Torga, 87, a novelist and poet who wrote about rural life in Portugal, died Tuesday in the northern city of Coimbra after a long illness. The retired country doctor published more than 50 novels and books of poetry. His most famous books include "Animals," "The Creation of the World" and "Mountain Tales."Paul Delouvrier, 80, who oversaw the modernization of the Paris area through much of the 1960s, died Monday in Paris.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Collier and Michael Collier,Special to the Sun | April 27, 2003
Since 1996, when President Clinton decreed April as National Poetry Month, publishers have turned what T.S. Eliot calls "the cruelest month" into the season in which they publish many of their books of poetry. During the spring, publishing houses such as Houghton Mifflin, Alfred A. Knopf, and W.W. Norton are apt to create advertising campaigns to support their distinguished poetry programs. Independent booksellers and chains such as Borders and Barnes & Noble give over additional window and display space to poetry.
FEATURES
By Arizona Republic | September 30, 1998
Joyce Carol Oates -- author of more than 30 novels, 20 short-story collections and eight books of poetry -- has penned her first children's book, a tale about an adventurous cat named Muffin who likes watermelon, lettuce, peanut butter and rye crackers. And who gets lost.Based on her real-life cat and the 4-year-old daughter of the book's editor, "Come Meet Muffin!" is a guaranteed hit for families with cats. However, the underlying themes of friendship and getting lost and returning home to the people who love you have universal appeal.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | October 24, 2002
American Book Award winner and former businessman Dana Gioia will be nominated to head the National Endowment for the Arts, President Bush announced yesterday. Although the appointment must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Gioia's nomination has been long-awaited. The NEA has been rudderless since its previous chairman, Michael Hammond, died Jan. 29, six days into the job. Gioia's background is extremely varied. His lengthy experience in the private sector may appeal to fiscal conservatives; arts advocates could be drawn to his literary credentials.
FEATURES
By Lenore Skenazy and Lenore Skenazy,New York Daily News | May 23, 1993
Beneath the heaving bosoms and just above the vampires, next to "The Firm" and not far from "Jurassic Park," you will find Maya Angelou's inaugural poem, "On the Pulse of Morning."Her poem, which begins, "A Rock, A River, A Tree," is selling like a best seller, in bookstores, gift shops -- even airports.The $5 book was positioned by her cash register for two months, moving briskly until ousted by an onslaught of Mother's Day books. Still, says Barnes & Noble saleswoman Jeri Ojeda, a rainbow of people continues to request the slim volume.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | January 31, 2003
Dana Gioia, a National Book Award-winning poet and businessman, will come to Washington early next month to head the National Endowment for the Arts. Gioia's appointment was confirmed unanimously by the U.S. Senate on Wednesday, a year to the day his predecessor, Michael P. Hammond, died unexpectedly after just one week on the job. "I am honored by the Senate's vote of confirmation. Now I am eager to get started," Gioia said in a news release. "Leading the National Endowment for the Arts is a great privilege and an enormous responsibility.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | October 2, 1994
A free performance of "Hamlet" by Shakespeare On Wheels, the traveling theater, is scheduled next weekend as part of an outdoor celebration of the new season of performing arts and visual-arts exhibitions at the University of Maryland Baltimore County."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1996
Norine Osbon Fox has written three books of poetry, but has not earned one penny from their sales."It's too much trouble to make out those income tax forms," she joked from her home on Chincoteague Island, Va.The truth is that the former Pasadena resident has donated more than $1,200 from her first work, "Chincoteague Chanteys," to the Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Browns Mills, N.J.The proceeds from her second work, "More Truth Than Poetry," will be...
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | January 31, 2003
Dana Gioia, a National Book Award-winning poet and businessman, will come to Washington early next month to head the National Endowment for the Arts. Gioia's appointment was confirmed unanimously by the U.S. Senate on Wednesday, a year to the day his predecessor, Michael P. Hammond, died unexpectedly after just one week on the job. "I am honored by the Senate's vote of confirmation. Now I am eager to get started," Gioia said in a news release. "Leading the National Endowment for the Arts is a great privilege and an enormous responsibility.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley | October 24, 2002
American Book Award winner and former businessman Dana Gioia will be nominated to head the National Endowment for the Arts, President Bush announced yesterday. Although the appointment must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Gioia's nomination has been long-awaited. The NEA has been rudderless since its previous chairman, Michael Hammond, died Jan. 29, six days into the job. Gioia's background is extremely varied. His lengthy experience in the private sector may appeal to fiscal conservatives; arts advocates could be drawn to his literary credentials.
NEWS
April 15, 2001
Children love the lyrical magic of poetry. It feeds their spirit, frees their inhibitions and allows them to laugh, create, reflect and relax. April 16-22 is set aside to celebrate Young People's Poetry Week. This event, sponsored by the Children's Book Council, highlights poetry for children and young adults and encourages everyone to celebrate poetry by reading it, enjoying it and writing it. Kalli Dakos, teacher and author of numerous books of poetry, writes in the April 2001 Instructor magazine, "A school year goes by so quickly.
FEATURES
By Arizona Republic | September 30, 1998
Joyce Carol Oates -- author of more than 30 novels, 20 short-story collections and eight books of poetry -- has penned her first children's book, a tale about an adventurous cat named Muffin who likes watermelon, lettuce, peanut butter and rye crackers. And who gets lost.Based on her real-life cat and the 4-year-old daughter of the book's editor, "Come Meet Muffin!" is a guaranteed hit for families with cats. However, the underlying themes of friendship and getting lost and returning home to the people who love you have universal appeal.
NEWS
January 19, 1997
I just read Sherman Alexie's "Indian Killer" I loved it, especially because he mentioned my favorite bookstore. Elliot Bay in Seattle has the best reading series and great brownies.I also just finished "Gone Fishin' ." Oh, I liked that. It's a quick read and I like the two characters Walter Mosley has created.I have two books waiting on my nightstand that I'm looking forward to: "Duchamp" by Calvin Tomkins and "Paris Noir: African Americans in the City of Light" by Tyler Stovall- E. Ethelbert Miller will judge this year's Artscape Literary Arts Award for Poetry.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1996
Norine Osbon Fox has written three books of poetry, but has not earned one penny from their sales."It's too much trouble to make out those income tax forms," she joked from her home on Chincoteague Island, Va.The truth is that the former Pasadena resident has donated more than $1,200 from her first work, "Chincoteague Chanteys," to the Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Browns Mills, N.J.The proceeds from her second work, "More Truth Than Poetry," will be...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Collier and Michael Collier,Special to the Sun | April 27, 2003
Since 1996, when President Clinton decreed April as National Poetry Month, publishers have turned what T.S. Eliot calls "the cruelest month" into the season in which they publish many of their books of poetry. During the spring, publishing houses such as Houghton Mifflin, Alfred A. Knopf, and W.W. Norton are apt to create advertising campaigns to support their distinguished poetry programs. Independent booksellers and chains such as Borders and Barnes & Noble give over additional window and display space to poetry.
NEWS
April 15, 2001
Children love the lyrical magic of poetry. It feeds their spirit, frees their inhibitions and allows them to laugh, create, reflect and relax. April 16-22 is set aside to celebrate Young People's Poetry Week. This event, sponsored by the Children's Book Council, highlights poetry for children and young adults and encourages everyone to celebrate poetry by reading it, enjoying it and writing it. Kalli Dakos, teacher and author of numerous books of poetry, writes in the April 2001 Instructor magazine, "A school year goes by so quickly.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | May 1, 1995
Michael Weaver considers poetry the glue of civilization."It keeps us together as a human society," he says. "It keeps our various selves -- physical and spiritual -- together. It keeps us in touch with that part of ourselves that goes beyond the quotidian. It's like prayer. It is prayer."Prize-winning author of five books of poetry and two plays, and professor of English at Rutgers University, Mr. Weaver will read his poetry at Irina's Cafe at 8:30 tomorrow night."Being black and a poet, I've always been in league with the underdog," Mr. Weaver says during a telephone interview from his home in Philadelphia.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | April 27, 1995
A poet with a deep sense of drama and of place, Daniel Mark Epstein writes of the woman throwing her baby from a burning house on Cathedral Street, the man without legs rolling himself along Park Avenue, the jockey riding at Laurel: "I was light but held my horse's sides / between my legs like a vise, / broke fast and rode hard for the rails, / had my share of the winners but loved them all. / I was the horse's mind, he was my heart."A resident of Baltimore, Mr. Epstein is excited about the poetry renaissance that is taking place here.
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