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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
The Baltimore County Public Library's Bookmobile will hold an open house from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the North Point Branch. The event, which celebrates National Library Week, will include tours for patrons of all ages and a rare opportunity for a behind-the-scenes look at bookmobile operations. During the visit, the traveling branch will offer story times for younger children, giveaways and an appearance by Sneaks the Cat, the system's mascot. All library materials will also be available for check-out.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
The Baltimore County Public Library's Bookmobile will hold an open house from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the North Point Branch. The event, which celebrates National Library Week, will include tours for patrons of all ages and a rare opportunity for a behind-the-scenes look at bookmobile operations. During the visit, the traveling branch will offer story times for younger children, giveaways and an appearance by Sneaks the Cat, the system's mascot. All library materials will also be available for check-out.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Any kid can have a bookmobile come through his or her neighborhood. But in Annapolis, kids last month were treated to what Tyler Heights Elementary School staff called a bookmobile/bookmocycle — a Honda Accord with a trunk full of children's books that was led by a Harley Davidson motorcycle. It is no wonder that a group led by Tyler Heights librarian Paula Borinsky Hendry and second-grade teacher Matt Schlegel gave away about 1,000 books to Annapolis-area youngsters during July.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
Any kid can have a bookmobile come through his or her neighborhood. But in Annapolis, kids last month were treated to what Tyler Heights Elementary School staff called a bookmobile/bookmocycle — a Honda Accord with a trunk full of children's books that was led by a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. It is no wonder that a group led by Tyler Heights librarian Paula Borinsky Hendry and second-grade teacher Matt Schlegel gave away about 1,000 books to Annapolis-area youngsters during July.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | April 14, 1991
When you can't get to the library, Carroll County's Public Library comes to you.For 24 years, Carroll's Bookmobile has been carrying materials to patrons in institutions -- including Springfield Hospital Center, Fairhaven and Timber Ridge -- and residents in about 25 county neighborhoods that can't travel to the library."
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,sun reporter | October 21, 2007
The Carroll County Public Library's new bookmobile is a 21st-century full-service library on wheels, complete with satellite capability and low-floor accessibility for wheelchairs and baby strollers. "That's the beauty of it. With the satellite, we can hook into the library system, and people can place their holds, and we can do searches for books," said Connie Wilson, who supervises the bookmobile staff. "Anything they can do in a branch, they can do here." The satellite dish folds flush with the roof when traveling or not in use, then can be raised when needed.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
The bookmobile parked beside the Pimlico Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library yesterday may not fill all of the neighborhood's literary needs, but it was a welcome addition to an area whose branch library was firebombed two weeks ago.About 50 people attended the brief ceremony announcing the bookmobile's arrival, among them a large group from nearby Park Heights Elementary School. Tiffany Grimes, a fifth-grader at the school, said she was disappointed when the library was burned, but is now to have a bookmobile.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2004
The Carroll County Public Library's bookmobile has been out of service since mid-December and is being repaired again, and the library director would like to see money in the county budget to buy a new one in the next few years. Otherwise, said Linda Mielke, the director, ""I'm going to get beat out by a snowplow." "I'm trying to find a way to get a new" bookmobile, said Mielke, who pitched the idea to the county commissioners in the fall but said she didn't get a definite response. "We've put a lot of money into it in the past few years in maintenance and repairs.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
The bookmobile parked beside the Pimlico Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library yesterday may not fill all of the neighborhood's literary needs, but it was a welcome addition to an area whose branch library was firebombed two weeks ago.About 50 people attended the brief ceremony announcing the bookmobile's arrival, among them a large group from nearby Park Heights Elementary School. Tiffany Grimes, a fifth-grader at the school, said she was disappointed when the library was burned, but is now pleased to have a bookmobile.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | September 20, 1991
Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library has three bookmobiles, but for more than a week all of them have been out of service and in the municipal garage for repairs.The absence of the bookmobiles, a trio of clunkers with 53 years of service among them, has left a large number of elderly people in the City That Reads without access to books. Library officials did not know last night when any of the vehicles would be back on the road.There has been no bookmobile service in Baltimore since last Thursday.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,sun reporter | October 21, 2007
The Carroll County Public Library's new bookmobile is a 21st-century full-service library on wheels, complete with satellite capability and low-floor accessibility for wheelchairs and baby strollers. "That's the beauty of it. With the satellite, we can hook into the library system, and people can place their holds, and we can do searches for books," said Connie Wilson, who supervises the bookmobile staff. "Anything they can do in a branch, they can do here." The satellite dish folds flush with the roof when traveling or not in use, then can be raised when needed.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
The Carroll County Public Library prides itself on being a great place to learn, and it has the numbers to back up the claim: Since 1994, the library has ranked first in the state in circulation per capita, with 21.3 items per person in fiscal year 2006. Of the county's estimated 163,200 residents last year, 90 percent were registered borrowers, and the library's five branches offered 5,555 programs, which were attended by more than 131,000 people. And all the while, the library continues to grow to meet the demands of its patrons.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the sun | January 31, 2007
The staff at the Howard County Central Library still remembers the day a patron walked in not with a book to return, but a warm apple pie. "Please give this to Marge Trautman. I'm so grateful for the books she's recommended," the woman said, according to reference librarian Kathy Lewis. Trautman, a longtime Howard County librarian, is retiring Friday after a 28-year career. Her reputation as a matchmaker between books and people won her a loyal following of patrons, and the occasional apple pie. Trautman has done everything from driving a Bookmobile to serving as interim manager at the central library - her current position.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | September 18, 2006
Cumberland -- It's a misty and miserable morning in Western Maryland - not exactly the kind of day that invites jaunts about town. Especially if you're an octogenarian. Especially if you don't drive. Could be a problem if your book cupboard is bare and all you want to do is curl up with a nice, fat political screed or a religious history book. But Cornelia Furlow, an 89-year-old, white-haired bibliophile, is not the least bit concerned. As expected, just a few minutes before 9 a.m., a boxy, colorful bookmobile bumps down her street and parks in the lot next to her low-slung brick house.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
When Laurie Hayes arrived in Mississippi with a group of fellow Maryland library officials to donate a mobile library and books to a town that had been ravaged by Hurricane Katrina, she was shocked by the devastation. As the group drove through the area in December, "you really couldn't tell whether the storm had hit days or months ago," she wrote in an e-mail. Approaching Pearlington, Miss., where they would make the donation, she wondered "just how important having access to a library would be to people who had lost so much."
NEWS
By Adam Rosen and Adam Rosen,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
More than a decade after budget cuts forced the Lansdowne branch of the Baltimore County Public Library to close, the county plans to open a "mini-library" there early next year. The budget for the fiscal year that began this month includes $437,000 to open and operate a scaled-down version of a regular branch. The county is looking for space to lease in hopes of having a 3,000-square-foot facility in operation in Lansdowne by January. Although it would be about a sixth of the size of a typical branch, the new mini-library "will not be simply something with a few best-selling books," library spokesman Bob Hughes said.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
William Shakespeare, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Francine Pascal have a new home: the Roger Carter Neighborhood Center."Romeo and Juliet," "The Scarlet Letter," and the "Sweet Valley High" series are some of the more than 8,000 works Centennial High School students donated Tuesday to the Ellicott City community center.The books are to fill the shelves of a makeshift library that is trying to fill a void created when budget cuts ended the visits to the area of the Howard County Public Library System's bookmobile.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
Finksburg council gives commissioners passing grades For their first marking period, the Carroll County commissioners, who took office 13 months ago, won high marks from the Finksburg Planning Area Council, particularly in the areas of community relations. The council, an unofficial panel that serves as a liaison between the community and the county, released its score card last week, reviving a practice it used with the previous commissioners, who frequently received failing grades. Council members gave the present board of commissioners A's in watershed protection, responsiveness to the council and parks, and B's or C's in most other areas.
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