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By Dave Rosenthal and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
The Man Booker Prize was awarded to 28-year-old New Zealander Eleanor Catton for her novel "The Luminaries. " Catton's novel -- only her second -- beat works from literary heavyweights such as Colm Tóibín (" The Testament of Mary ") and Jhumpa Lahiri ("The Lowland") for a prize of 50,000 pounds -- about $80,000. Here is a description of "The Luminaries" from Man Booker: Walter Moody has come to make his fortune upon the New Zealand goldfields.  On arrival, he stumbles across a tense gathering of twelve local men, who have met in secret to discuss a series of unsolved crimes.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
It's possible that Matthew Olshan didn't fully become a writer until the day that his future boss ordered him to dig a ditch. On that day in the late 1980s, the boss, a carpenter, eyed the short kid with the soft hands. He saw a young man with no experience in the building trades, a new degree from Harvard University and a bewildering mix of aspirations that combined literature and woodworking. The older man understandably was skeptical. "Show up tomorrow and we'll see how you do," he told Olshan.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler has been named a finalist for the 2011 Man Booker International Prize, a biennial literary award that carries with it a cash prize of more than $96,000. Tyler, 69, is one of 13 finalists for the prize, which is awarded every other year by the Australia-based Man Group. The prize of 60,000 British pounds is given for an author's body of work and continuing contributions to world fiction. Others on this year's nominees' list include Americans Marilynne Robinson and Philip Roth.
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By Dave Rosenthal and The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
The Man Booker Prize was awarded to 28-year-old New Zealander Eleanor Catton for her novel "The Luminaries. " Catton's novel -- only her second -- beat works from literary heavyweights such as Colm Tóibín (" The Testament of Mary ") and Jhumpa Lahiri ("The Lowland") for a prize of 50,000 pounds -- about $80,000. Here is a description of "The Luminaries" from Man Booker: Walter Moody has come to make his fortune upon the New Zealand goldfields.  On arrival, he stumbles across a tense gathering of twelve local men, who have met in secret to discuss a series of unsolved crimes.
NEWS
March 26, 1999
William F. "Bush" Bringle,85, a World War II aviator who worked his way through the ranks of naval air forces in the Pacific Fleet and in Europe, died of pneumonia March 19 in San Diego. He was a retired admiral. Roy Lee Johnson,93, a retired admiral who ordered Navy ships to fire on North Vietnamese torpedo boats in the Gulf of Tonkin during the Vietnam War, died Saturday in Virginia Beach, Va. He ordered the attacks after the torpedo boats fired on two U.S. destroyers on Aug. 4, 1964.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
A February harvest of novels, some with tender young stalks and others with the toughened bark of experience: Get ready for darkness and delights, starting with David Mitchell's Number9Dream (Random House, 400 pages, $24.95), which was short-listed for the Booker Prize (or, as it's usually said, "Britain's prestigious Booker Prize"). And what a rich and lively experience it is. Set in Japan, where Mitchell (Ghostwritten) teaches, it centers on young man, Eiji Miyaki, who travels to Tokyo from his rural roots to seek out his father.
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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,sun staff | May 24, 1998
WASHINGTON - Don't hate her because she is beautiful.Arundhati Roy told People magazine that she wanted nothing to do with its annual list of the world's 50 most fabulous faces, and they put her in there anyway.It also would be unfair to hate her just because her first novel, "The God of Small Things," is an international best seller that has made her millions, or because John Updike hailed it as a "Tiger Woodsian debut." Nor can one begrudge her Great Britain's Booker Prize, a literary award so hot that English bookmakers lay odds on it.The tiniest frisson of dismay is permitted, however, when Roy confides she is pleased her reading here has been moved to a larger venue in order to accommodate the throngs.
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By Vanessa Gezari and Vanessa Gezari,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2002
NEW DELHI -- Arundhati Roy looks smaller than usual as she strides out of the courthouse and steps into a waiting ambassador sedan bound for jail. Here is the celebrated author - whose lush and lyrical novel The God of Small Things won Britain's Booker Prize - flanked by policewomen with riot clubs. For an instant, Roy ceases to be the famous writer who helped clear an honored place for Indian writers on the world literary map. She instead becomes the common citizen, whose cause she has championed in ardent polemics against big dams, bombs and the U.S.-led war on terrorism: The small individual, powerless against a vast and mighty government, her voice nearly drowned out by the thunder of the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Plunging into a novel by James Kelman is like diving head-first into a chilly lake. It's a shock to your system at first, and a bit disorienting, but the trick is to keep moving. Once your muscles get warmed up and you get your bearings, the experience is exhilarating. Kelman, 66, is the Man Booker Award-winning author (in 1994 for "How Late It Was, How Late") whose novels champion the working-class people of his native Scotland. His novels are typically told through the point of view of one character, and from the opening sentence, the reader is thrust headlong into his narrator's thoughts and perceptions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
It's possible that Matthew Olshan didn't fully become a writer until the day that his future boss ordered him to dig a ditch. On that day in the late 1980s, the boss, a carpenter, eyed the short kid with the soft hands. He saw a young man with no experience in the building trades, a new degree from Harvard University and a bewildering mix of aspirations that combined literature and woodworking. The older man understandably was skeptical. "Show up tomorrow and we'll see how you do," he told Olshan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Plunging into a novel by James Kelman is like diving head-first into a chilly lake. It's a shock to your system at first, and a bit disorienting, but the trick is to keep moving. Once your muscles get warmed up and you get your bearings, the experience is exhilarating. Kelman, 66, is the Man Booker Award-winning author (in 1994 for "How Late It Was, How Late") whose novels champion the working-class people of his native Scotland. His novels are typically told through the point of view of one character, and from the opening sentence, the reader is thrust headlong into his narrator's thoughts and perceptions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler has been named a finalist for the 2011 Man Booker International Prize, a biennial literary award that carries with it a cash prize of more than $96,000. Tyler, 69, is one of 13 finalists for the prize, which is awarded every other year by the Australia-based Man Group. The prize of 60,000 British pounds is given for an author's body of work and continuing contributions to world fiction. Others on this year's nominees' list include Americans Marilynne Robinson and Philip Roth.
NEWS
By Vanessa Gezari and Vanessa Gezari,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2002
NEW DELHI -- Arundhati Roy looks smaller than usual as she strides out of the courthouse and steps into a waiting ambassador sedan bound for jail. Here is the celebrated author - whose lush and lyrical novel The God of Small Things won Britain's Booker Prize - flanked by policewomen with riot clubs. For an instant, Roy ceases to be the famous writer who helped clear an honored place for Indian writers on the world literary map. She instead becomes the common citizen, whose cause she has championed in ardent polemics against big dams, bombs and the U.S.-led war on terrorism: The small individual, powerless against a vast and mighty government, her voice nearly drowned out by the thunder of the crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
A February harvest of novels, some with tender young stalks and others with the toughened bark of experience: Get ready for darkness and delights, starting with David Mitchell's Number9Dream (Random House, 400 pages, $24.95), which was short-listed for the Booker Prize (or, as it's usually said, "Britain's prestigious Booker Prize"). And what a rich and lively experience it is. Set in Japan, where Mitchell (Ghostwritten) teaches, it centers on young man, Eiji Miyaki, who travels to Tokyo from his rural roots to seek out his father.
NEWS
March 26, 1999
William F. "Bush" Bringle,85, a World War II aviator who worked his way through the ranks of naval air forces in the Pacific Fleet and in Europe, died of pneumonia March 19 in San Diego. He was a retired admiral. Roy Lee Johnson,93, a retired admiral who ordered Navy ships to fire on North Vietnamese torpedo boats in the Gulf of Tonkin during the Vietnam War, died Saturday in Virginia Beach, Va. He ordered the attacks after the torpedo boats fired on two U.S. destroyers on Aug. 4, 1964.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,sun staff | May 24, 1998
WASHINGTON - Don't hate her because she is beautiful.Arundhati Roy told People magazine that she wanted nothing to do with its annual list of the world's 50 most fabulous faces, and they put her in there anyway.It also would be unfair to hate her just because her first novel, "The God of Small Things," is an international best seller that has made her millions, or because John Updike hailed it as a "Tiger Woodsian debut." Nor can one begrudge her Great Britain's Booker Prize, a literary award so hot that English bookmakers lay odds on it.The tiniest frisson of dismay is permitted, however, when Roy confides she is pleased her reading here has been moved to a larger venue in order to accommodate the throngs.
NEWS
December 10, 2006
The Night Watch By Sarah WatersWaters narrates the lives of a group of women - and some men - as they are affected by the terrors of the London Blitz and World War II's aftermath, playing the narrative backward from 1947. Wartime can be a time of kindness amidst stunning atrocity and we can see the courage and goodness that is possible in this book, which was short-listed for Britain' s Man Booker Prize.
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