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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 23, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Colin L. Powell closed his book tour last week much as he opened it five weeks ago -- with exuberant crowds, high poll ratings, and with much of the nation trying to decode his every word in search of the truth about his presidential intentions.The Persian Gulf war hero and now best-selling author isn't saying whether he's in or out, only that he will decide in about two weeks, after holing up with family, friends and advisers.Meanwhile, the waiting game has put the '96 presidential campaign in a sort of deep-freeze, with the declared Republican candidates not yet knowing how they would take on such a seemingly formidable competitor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Baltimore writer Rafael Alvarez was driving around the country peddling his books, he sold a collection of his newspaper articles and short stories to a drunken farmer in a men's room outside Memphis, Tenn. He's spent countless nights sleeping in his truck. He's traded a book for a meal. A good day is when he ekes out just enough money to buy enough gas to get him to the next town - and that's assuming he doesn't run into an ice storm. So what would Alvarez consider to be a not-so-good day on the road?
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NEWS
October 22, 1995
AS COLIN POWELL'S book tour ended, Republicans were beginning to take the possibility of his running for president very seriously. Here are a few things said about him last week: Former White House Chief of Staff John Sununu said he was not a leader but a follower, suited to be secretary of state but not president. Lamar Alexander said he is "too liberal to be nominated." Phil Gramm said he is "a better fit for the Democratic Party." Bob Dole said his views could not stand the scrutiny a campaign would bring.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 23, 2014
Now there are two. Two smart, tough and articulate women who could be president. Thirty years after Geraldine Ferraro became the first woman on the presidential ticket of a major party, we have two women who could easily lead that ticket in 2016. Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren. It is almost an embarrassment of riches. Ms. Warren, the Democratic senator from Massachusetts who has made a populist name for herself fighting banks and Wall Street, just released the requisite autobiography, "A Fighting Chance.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 11, 1999
A lot of authors complain about book tours. They gripe about endless flights and a numbing string of hotel rooms, tell horror stories about early-morning talk shows and moan about the wrist strain brought on by autographing hundreds and hundreds of books. To hear them tell it, being on a book tour is like hell on earth. Not Suzanne Vega, though. She loves going out to promote her new book, a collection of poems, song lyrics and prose called "The Passionate Eye." But then, she probably has a different perspective on touring from the average author, because she's spent large chunks of the last 14 years touring as a singer-songwriter.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
This past spring, author J. Anthony Lukas and Simon & Schuster publicist Victoria Meyer outlined a rigorous 21-city book tour to promote his new book, "Big Trouble," an epic account of a turn-of-the century assassination in Idaho, and its significance for a nation mired in the quicksand of class conflict and identity.Lukas' itinerary would begin Sept. 9 in Oregon, proceed to Washington state and then Idaho, the primary locale of "Big Trouble" (Simon & Schuster, $32.50). From there, Lukas was to ** blow across the West to St. Louis and Chicago, and finally return to the East Coast.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1998
Two third-grade girls shrieked like star-struck fans when Carmen Phillips entered Riverview Elementary School yesterday.The state superintendent of schools acknowledged she was "envious" of Carmen's artistic abilities. The principal of Chase Elementary School called her an "inspiration" for young writers.All of the attention was more than a little unfamiliar to Carmen -- she is just an 11-year-old from Ocean City.But as the author and illustrator of the children's book "Cleocatra," Carmen was invited to tour two Baltimore County elementary schools yesterday, shaking hands, autographing books and talking to students about reading and writing.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 24, 2001
You can imagine my reaction when I found out that Jamling Tenzing Norgay was coming to Miami. My reaction was: "Who?" Then I found out that he is the son of Tenzing Norgay, the legendary Sherpa guide who was with Edmund Hillary in 1953 when they became the first people to reach the top of Mount Everest. In 1996, Jamling followed in his father's footsteps as the climbing leader of the team that went to the summit and filmed the IMAX movie "Everest." He was coming to Miami to talk about his excellent book on that expedition, "Touching My Father's Soul."
FEATURES
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 2, 1995
Newt Gingrich and Colin Powell, candidates for president? Maybe. But right now they're hawking books.Touring the country as a celebrity author may be the latest device for testing the waters for a presidential bid. Critics call it politicking on the publisher's tab."It's very comparable to a presidential campaign: two or three cities a day, speeches that become repetitive, a lot of press interest," says Anne Hathaway, a spokeswoman for former Vice President Dan Quayle, who used a book tour last year to re-enter the national spotlight after having left office in 1992.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | January 3, 1993
By the time I saw Larry King interview the snake, my brain was a whimpering wad of useless tissue. I had been on a book-promotion tour for several weeks, following the standard book-tour schedule, which is designed by publicity experts who do not believe in letting you fritter away valuable time on non-promotional activities such as eating and sleeping. I'd be in, say, Seattle, and I'd ask, "Do you think I could go to the bathroom?" And the publicity people would frown at the schedule and say, "Not today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Because the Baltimore-area novelist Alice McDermott possesses a painterly eye that delights in the way things look and sound and smell and taste, it can be easy to miss her underlying focus. For the National Book Award-winning author, each small sensory jolt that originates in this world is a gateway to a more incorporeal realm. "Marie takes a spiritual journey in this novel," McDermott says of the heroine of her newly released book, "Someone: A Novel. " "She goes from not understanding at all to not quite understanding to understanding a little bit. Early in the book, her brother makes an absolutely outrageous proposition from the Gospel of Matthew, that all the hairs on our heads are counted and that we're not alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
Sherlock Holmes un-kicked the bucket way back in 1894. More than a century later, even though Harry Potter ends up on the wrong side of a killing curse, he un-bites the dust. In "Game of Thrones," Beric Dondarrion has un-bought the farm at least six times, despite having been hanged, impaled by a lance, bashed in the head with a mace and stabbed through the eye with a dagger. And that's just by the end of the third season. So author Walter Mosley had ample precedent to un-pull the plug on his most famous fictional creation, Ezekiel "Easy" Rawlins.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| May 10, 2013
When Jill Smokler - more widely known as Scary Mommy - starts talking about motherhood, you'll hear a lot about sleepless nights, green snot and having kids walk into the master bedroom at the most inopportune times. Does she think her children are amazing and love them to death? Definitely. But mothering them didn't come naturally. As she says in her new book, "Motherhood Comes Naturally (and Other Vicious Lies)," what does come naturally is "Food. Sleep. Comfort. Privacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
In one way or another, Manil Suri has spent his entire life charting what happens when polar opposites are brought together in unexpected and at times startling juxtapositions. Suri, 53, is an acclaimed novelist, and a career mathematician who teaches at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He spent the first two decades of his life in India and the past three in the United States. Though all his books to date have been set in Mumbai, they are written in English. Suri's debut novel, "The Death of Vishnu," set off a bidding war between 11 publishing houses in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
Junot - and Yunior - are back. Junot Diaz is the MacArthur Fellowship-winning writer whose work reflects his Dominican roots and his Jersey youth, and who has dazzled critics and audiences with a virtuosic narrative voice that weaves tales of young men similar to the ones he grew up with. Yunior is one of Diaz's most indelible characters - brilliant, posturing, alienated, self-destructive and, for better or worse, unable to fully inhabit his own mask. Readers previously met Yunior in the 2006 short-story collection "Drown" and in the novel "The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao," which won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | October 25, 2012
In 2008, Paul Tough's first book, “Whatever It Takes,” told the story of the Harlem Children's Zone, a massive effort to leverage a pre-birth-through-high-school system of education services to change the trajectory of 10,000 children in one 97-block area. In his new best-seeling book, “How Children Succeed” - recently praised by commentators ranging from conservative David Brooks to liberal Nicholas Kristof - Mr. Tough examines the lifelong impacts of stress during childhood and the noncognitive skills, like grit and curiosity, that could help mitigate early learning deficits.
NEWS
By KARLAYNE R. PARKER and KARLAYNE R. PARKER,UNISUN EDITOR | June 4, 2006
There were lots of nationally renowned speakers in town worth listening to this spring. All of them came with a cause. Broadcaster Tavis Smiley stopped at a local church in April to talk about his book, Covenant With Black America, which is a New York Times best-seller. He was promoting the book and its goal -- to uplift and empower African- Americans. Many of us saw Hotel Rwanda, a movie that depicted the massacre of hundreds of thousands of people in Rwanda. Rwanda hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina, who lived through the events and saved many lives, came to town in April to give insights to the massacre as part of his book tour.
NEWS
June 22, 2004
BILL CLINTON is a big guy who undertakes everything he does in a big way. Enormously talented yet destructively flawed, the former president's turbulent life so far has been marked by great achievement and behavior that raises serious questions about his judgment. He clawed his way up from a wretched childhood to reach the pinnacle of American power but failed to fulfill his potential, brought down by his huge galaxy of enemies and his own self-indulgence. Memories of the combustible Clinton years in the White House are flooding back as the 42nd president whistle-stops from Oprah Winfrey to Larry King and most every forum in between to hawk the $10 million memoir that will help pay his remaining legal bills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2012
When the British author Chris Cleave published his debut novel, "Incendiary," he fell victim to perhaps the worst historical coincidence ever to afflict an author. The book, about a terrorist attack in a London sports stadium, was released on July 7, 2005 - the same day that three suicide bombers detonated their devices in the London underground transit system. Cleave's publishers yanked "Incendiary" off the shelves and canceled Cleave's book tour. He was so depressed that for a time he stopped writing.
FEATURES
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
Marian Caldwell has it all. Kind of. At 36, she's the executive producer of a scripted TV show. She's dating the handsome CEO of her network. And she has an apartment on Manhattan's Upper East Side. But Marian also has problems. Among them: The girl she gave up for adoption 18 years ago has just walked back into her life, and she has some questions - questions that will bring up secrets buried deep in Marian's past. So begins "Where We Belong," Emily Giffin's sixth novel, which debuted in late July and zoomed to the best-seller lists, just like her five previous works.
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