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NEWS
August 13, 1995
"The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success," Deepak Chopra. It's very inspirational, very positive. He talks about potential, and all the potential we have and that we just have to tap it!"Joan Pratt,DemocratI'm in the middle of "Lord of the Rings." It's not the first time I've read it. It's a relaxing book to read. Besides that, I'm reading the city budget.Christopher McShane, RepublicanI just finished "True North," by Jill Ker Conway. I liked her first book better. Now I'm reading "W.E.B. Dubois," by David Levering Lewis.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | April 24, 2007
Something old, something new, something borrowed, something to read? Gail from Pasadena is looking for a good book as a wedding gift. Seeking suggestions, she writes: "Our nephew is getting married at the end of May, and, in addition to the usual mixer, blender, whatever, I'd like to give him and his fiancee a good book on money and finance. They're in their mid-20s." Helping a young couple get started on the right financial footing is an excellent idea. Years ago, I gave my newly married sister Making the Most of Your Money by Jane Bryant Quinn for Christmas.
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FEATURES
December 23, 1998
" 'The Olympic Summer Games' by Caroline Arnold is really cool. I like it because it has my favorite sport. It is basketball. It is one of the best books I got from the library."- Patrick DoughertySeven Oaks Elementary" 'Nate the Great and the Boring Beach Bag' by Marjorie Weinman Sharmat is a fun book to read because in this book nothing is really stolen. Nate's friend just left his bag where he had it. I also like this book because I love mystery books!"- Lauren PhillipsLutherville Laboratory"I liked reading 'Amelia Bedelia' by Peggy Parish.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | October 16, 2005
Look again in Baltimore John Dorsey Photographs by James DuSel The Johns Hopkins University Press / 189 pages A few years ago the photographer James DuSel asked John Dorsey, Baltimore's premier art and architecture critic, if he would consider doing a book with him. Dorsey recalls saying "yes" without a second's hesitation. The result is this book, a long meditation by Dorsey on DuSel's evocative photographs and on art, architecture and life - in a volume handsomely published by the Johns Hopkins press.
NEWS
August 22, 2001
"I read Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. It was about a boy on a journey to find his father. It was a great book, and I could not put it down." -- Kim Hilson Roland Park Elementary "A great book to read is Stormbreaker by Anthony Horowitz. It is a story about a boy named Alex Rider, whose uncle supposedly died in a car crash. Alex discovers his uncle was a secret agent who was in fact murdered. Alex is trained to take over his uncle's dangerous mission armed only with a very special yo-yo, some acidic zit-away cream and a very hi-tech Game Boy. I like this book because it is suspenseful and full of excitement."
NEWS
January 30, 2002
"If you like books about babies and how they grow on you, then you should read Where in the World Is the Perfect Family? by Amy Hest. The book starts with Connie's father telling her that her stepmom is going to have a baby. This book was a great book because once you start reading it you can't stop. I especially liked this book because I have a dad, a stepmom and a baby sister, like in the book." -- Megan Verner Oakleigh Elementary "I love to read books about animals. One of my favorites is If You Were a Kitten by Carol Watson.
FEATURES
February 10, 1999
''I read 'Today I Feel Silly & Other Moods that Make My Day' by Jamie Lee Curtis. This book is fantastic. It has great pictures that make the story really funny. Also, I thought this book was a fantastic book to read because the main character's feelings are like my feelings on some given days. This book is good for a bad day or sad day at home or at school.''- Kayla Penn-JonesChurch Lane Elementary``I've been reading a series called 'Animorphs' by K.A. Applegate. The 'Animorphs' books are about five teen-agers who are given the power to morph into animals to save Earth from alien slugs called Yeerks.
NEWS
December 26, 2001
"I like the book Ghost Town at Sundown by Mary Pope Osborne because it has cool things to say about the West and a cowboy named Slim Cooly. It's one of the best books I've ever read." -- Adam Ellerbrock Our Lady of Perpetual Help School "I recommend Gingerbread Baby by Jan Brett. In it, a boy and his mother are making a gingerbread man, but they do not wait for him to bake, and a gingerbread baby jumped out of the oven instead. 'I am the gingerbread baby, fresh from the pan,' he said.
FEATURES
April 1, 1998
"My favorite book is 'Where the Sidewalk Ends,' by Shel Silverstein because the poems and drawings are funny. I like the poem called 'Sick' because it is about a girl who is pretending to be sick so she won't have to go to school. I think that is the funniest poem. I think everyone would like it."Samantha Goslee, Grade 3,North Harford Elementary"My favorite book is 'Dinosaur Time' by Peggy Parrish. It is a good book to read. I like the characters. The characters are mean."-- Shae Jackson, Grade 2Bedford ElementaryThe Sun invites its young readers to send in their book reviews, and we will print them on this page or on sunspot.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp and Susan Rapp,Village Reading Center | October 25, 1998
One of the pleasures of learning to read is being able to relax with a good book. Adults enjoy choosing books about their interests, and children deserve the same courtesy. When you help your child select a book to read silently or aloud, let him choose the type of story he wishes to read. Here are some tips to keep in mind when selecting a book with your child for independent reading:* Use annotated and graded booklists suggested by your child's teacher or a librarian. One useful list is the "Children's Choice" published yearly by the International Reading Association, 800-336-READ.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2003
An eminent Johns Hopkins Hospital surgeon's autobiography will be the next book designated by city leaders as the second annual "Baltimore's Book" for city residents to read and discuss over the summer. Gifted Hands: The Ben Carson Story, published in 1990 and written by Hopkins pediatric neurosurgeon Ben Carson with Cecil Murphy, tells of Carson's rise from difficult circumstances as a child in Detroit to Yale University, medical school and the Hopkins faculty, where he performs intricate brain surgery almost daily.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Special to the Sun | May 5, 2002
Perhaps the most courageous thing a writer can do is to knowingly write the last book. To settle in with the final hero, to weave the final themes, to put the final word upon the page, and to push back, stand up, turn one's head, and walk away. Last books: How many writers know that they are writing theirs? How many writers can bear the thought of silence, evermore? No prequel. No sequel. No next chance. Only silence. This past March, I received a copy of Carol Shields' exquisite new novel Unless (Fourth Estate Fiction, 256 pages, $24.95)
NEWS
January 30, 2002
"If you like books about babies and how they grow on you, then you should read Where in the World Is the Perfect Family? by Amy Hest. The book starts with Connie's father telling her that her stepmom is going to have a baby. This book was a great book because once you start reading it you can't stop. I especially liked this book because I have a dad, a stepmom and a baby sister, like in the book." -- Megan Verner Oakleigh Elementary "I love to read books about animals. One of my favorites is If You Were a Kitten by Carol Watson.
NEWS
December 26, 2001
"I like the book Ghost Town at Sundown by Mary Pope Osborne because it has cool things to say about the West and a cowboy named Slim Cooly. It's one of the best books I've ever read." -- Adam Ellerbrock Our Lady of Perpetual Help School "I recommend Gingerbread Baby by Jan Brett. In it, a boy and his mother are making a gingerbread man, but they do not wait for him to bake, and a gingerbread baby jumped out of the oven instead. 'I am the gingerbread baby, fresh from the pan,' he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Teachout and Elizabeth Teachout,Special to the Sun | December 16, 2001
Walk into my three-storied neighborhood book joint only at the risk of being struck blind by the glittering displays of Christmas books. From Truman Capote to Jimmy Carter to that pioneer of self-help, M. Scott Peck, there is no shortage of writers who have jumped at the chance to spin their versions of the meaning of Christmas. And -- at least if you're inclined to believe fulsome flap copy -- most of them run that microscopic gamut from "heart-warming" to "an instant classic." Why is my slightly maudlin, Christmas-loving heart largely unwarmed?
NEWS
August 22, 2001
"I read Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. It was about a boy on a journey to find his father. It was a great book, and I could not put it down." -- Kim Hilson Roland Park Elementary "A great book to read is Stormbreaker by Anthony Horowitz. It is a story about a boy named Alex Rider, whose uncle supposedly died in a car crash. Alex discovers his uncle was a secret agent who was in fact murdered. Alex is trained to take over his uncle's dangerous mission armed only with a very special yo-yo, some acidic zit-away cream and a very hi-tech Game Boy. I like this book because it is suspenseful and full of excitement."
FEATURES
By Jerdine Nolen | November 1, 1998
Editor's note: In her biweekly column, Jerdine Nolen today provides suggestions on how to prepare infants and toddlers to read, listen and write.Infants and toddlers enjoy:* Joining in and being a part of the reading experience* Hearing nursery rhymes and verses* Pointing to objects in large, colorful pictures* Seeing babies pictured in books* Reading shape and plastic books* Reading the same book over and over* Being introduced to new books* Repeating short...
FEATURES
By Marcia Vanderlip and Marcia Vanderlip,Dallas Morning News | November 7, 1991
Let's get in the proper frame of mind: The best place to keep "Let There Be Clothes," according to the author, is probably in the bathroom reading rack.And while you're there contemplating varicose veins and big thighs, don't despair. Sit down, and read a quick essay or two from the book by Lynn Schnurnberger, (Workman Publishing, $19.95 paperback)."This is a good book to read if you aren't happy with a part of your body," says Ms. Schnurnberger, who's on a countrywide tour to promote her funny new book that touches on some of the brightest and darkest moments in 40,000 years of fashion -- from the fig leaf to the catsuit.
NEWS
December 24, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Sharing a book with a child is a uniquely rewarding and pleasurable experience. Here are 10 recently published titles that are tops on my list. Keep in mind that many books easily read by beginning readers can be enjoyed by older readers. Moreover, many more advanced reading books may be read aloud and enjoyed by early readers. "Bark, George" by Jules Feiffer: This irresistible puppy only says meow, moo or quack until his mother takes him to the veterinarian to solve the problem -- or does he?
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2000
IT'S THE DAY before Christmas, and the Grinch is poised to steal it. Of course, every Who in Who-ville who has read the Dr. Seuss classic knows what will happen. That's the beauty of children's literature: With every reading, there are new surprises and old pleasures. Who cares if we know the plot? So if you haven't finished shopping for the kids, or if you're homebound with the darlings until they return to school in January, take the advice of JoAnn Fruchtman, owner of the Children's Bookstore in Roland Park: "If you're choosing a book to read to children 50 times, you've got to like it."
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