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By Jacques Kelly | October 5, 1997
THE DEMOLITION contractors are now wrecking one of Baltimore's most celebrated literary addresses, 913 N. Charles St. While too young to have frequented the legendary Peabody Book Shop -- and its famous beer stube -- in the days when it was owned by Siegfried Weisberger, I did spend many an afternoon in his fine company.I never knew the Baltimore institution he established in the days when this grand Austrian gentleman, said to have resembled character actor Jean Hersholt, presided over his coffee, beer and sandwich room set back deep in the narrow basement of a rather musty and confined book-crammed shop.
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NEWS
By Krishana Davis | April 25, 2014
Randy Myers might technically be in the business of selling books, but he says he doesn't fret the impact the Internet or e-readers is having on the business, recently opening his second Collector's Corner comic book shop in February in Harford County. “People want to hold [comics] in their hand,” Myers said. “It's the tactile nature of the comic book that gives it more of a chance at surviving the digital age. It's not just the words, but it's the illustrations.” The shop prides itself on its selection of popular titles, such as the widely known series-turned-hit-TV-show “The Walking Dead,” the classic DC and Marvel Comics brands and small stapled comics from obscure indie brands such as Microcosm Publishing.
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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | February 18, 1993
The Little Theater on the Corner in historic Ellicott City is re-opening as a combination second-run movie house and a comics and collectibles shop.Three former comic book store employees have a five-year lease with an extension option on the building at the corner of Main Street and Old Columbia Pike. The former home of Onstage Productions, a nonprofit children's theater group that operated for 10 years at the prime downtown site, has been vacant since August 1991.Charles Kimbrough, 31, Daniel Poreca III, 27, and Joseph Ferraro, 23, worked together at Geppi's Comic World in Woodlawn before becoming partners in forming Santa Lives Productions, the corporate name for the movie theater and comic shop.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
In and around the State House this month, between the lobbyist-politico strategy sessions and Navy officer-midshipmen sit-downs for coffee, one is bound to run into a pleasant surprise on Maryland Avenue: a half-dozen strollers parked outside an inconspicuous locale. The Wise Willow, a children's toy and book shop just a few hundred feet from the State House, hosts a singing story time at 11 a.m. Wednesdays that usually draws about a dozen children. Because the toddlers have short attention spans, Mary Bauer, a former schoolteacher, sings songs between stories to keep them interested.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1996
Owners of the vacant Peabody Book Shop and Beer Stube want members of the Mount Vernon-Belvedere Association to put up or shut up.Directors of the community group voted last week to oppose a request by the establishment's owners to demolish the book shop and tavern at 913 N. Charles St., which was frequented by H. L. Mencken, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and musicians, poets and artists. Association members want the owners, 913 North Charles Street Limited Partnership, to save at least the facade, and repair or reconstruct the rest.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1996
Taking its strongest step yet to help preserve the old Peabody Book Shop and Beer Stube, a city commission voted yesterday to deny the owner's request for a demolition permit.Members of the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP) listened to nearly four hours of testimony before unanimously rejecting an application to raze the four-story building at 913 N. Charles St. The commission voted last month to designate it a "contributing building" within the Mount Vernon historic district, which means it cannot be razed without the panel's consent.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1997
If you stand in the rubble of the Peabody Book Shop and Beer Stube and listen very, very hard to the first winds of autumn, you may hear echoes of a ragtime piano, or H. L. Mencken ordering another round, or even the slither of the cards as Dantini the Magician performs his magic act for the last time.In a kind of exquisite irony, the demolition of the Charles Street landmark began on the first day of this year's Baltimore Book Festival. First to be razed was the Viennese Brauhaus Siegfried Weisberger had created in 1933 at the rear of his shop, making it probably the first bookstore in America with its own tap room, its own Bierstube.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | September 21, 1992
The Towson Commons mixed-use complex in the center of Baltimore County's seat has lined up four new tenants, who will push occupancy at the $70 million complex above 50 percent for the first time since opening earlier this year.VIPS Inc., a Towson software firm, will move into 60,000 square feet of Towson Commons' 190,000-square-foot office building next year. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co. has also leased 13,000 square feet of office space at the complex and will move a group of in-house attorneys from Columbia.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | November 10, 1992
IF you hang around the Mt. Vernon area long enough, you'l see groups on walking tours, getting a glimpse of the monuments, museums and other buildings that help give this part of the city a special character.Included: the Walters, the soaring (and now refurbished) Washington Monument, the many mansions on and near Mt. Vernon Square, the Peabody Library.But alas, the Peabody Book Shop and Beer Stube, though it's still there on the east side of the 900 block of North Charles Street, no longer rates a tour guide's mention.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
The home of Baltimore's once-famous Peabody Book Shop and Beer Stube on the market for $1?It sounds too good to be true, but it's no joke.Facing stiff opposition to their plan to demolish the three-story building at 913 N. Charles St., the owners say they'd be willing to lease it for 99 years for $1 to anyone with a sound rehabilitation plan and the resources to carry it out.William Sammons, an attorney representing the owners, notified Baltimore's Commission...
NEWS
January 24, 2005
Lawrence A. Adams Sr., owner of a Highlandtown used-book shop, died of cancer Thursday at the Easton home of a friend. He was 63. Mr. Adams was born in Florida and moved to Highlandtown, where he was raised. He attended Patterson Park High School and served in the Army during the 1960s. After working for a decade for Singer Sewing Machine in Silver Spring, he established Lamira's Bookshelf in 1977 in his Linthicum home. He moved the business, which he operated until his death, to the 3400 block of E. Baltimore St. in Highlandtown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 15, 2002
It will please me if you take the advice of one or more of the nine book lovers whose proposals for holiday reading appear on these pages. Both reading and being read to aloud can be a wonderfully nourishing intimacy -- drawing people together in a connection that is intense. I have known at least one person who could -- and did -- recite from memory every one of the roughly 2,500 words of O. Henry's "The Gift of the Magi," long an American favorite, which is recommended again today by Paul Duke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 17, 2000
'Tis the season to be jolly, just as surely as the Magis follow the Eastern Star, bearing stuff. I am not an enthusiast for obligatory gift lists in newspapers and magazines. As to books, I believe that a gentle trot through a good book shop will do you more good than the endless inventories recommended by editors. A nasty little secret of publishing is that many -- maybe most -- of those lists are generated by a Macedonian phalanx of public relations people, and the consequence is that legions of blameless citizens get as gifts books that never have their covers cracked.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | November 22, 1998
From time to time on these pages we pose a question, related to books, to two or three dozen smart people, and publish their answers. Today, on the page facing this one, there is a series of neat little stories about gift books that have had unusual impact. I hope they may aid and comfort our readers in this gift-choosing season.I am grateful to our respondents, busy people all, including Mayor Schmoke, with his generous-hearted citation.Searching my memory, I find I have given away so many books that no single miracle stands out. But I hope you find the others' answers helpful - more so than the endless holiday listings published by many newspapers and magazines.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 1998
WE ARE losing an old friend in the community. Toomey's Bookshop in the Shipley Linthicum Shopping Center on Camp Meade Road is closing its doors Saturday. We have been lucky to have such a store. Local people stopped in frequently to see what new books had been added. Or they picked up a used one at a resonable price. But shoppers would also come from distances if they were particularly interested in the Civil War or another military confrontation. Daniel Toomey, Ferndale resident and owner of the shop, is author and publisher of five books on Baltimore's and Maryland's participation in the Civil War. "Opening a book shop is something I always wanted to do. I tried it and I truly enjoyed it, especially the first three and four years," said Toomey.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1997
If you stand in the rubble of the Peabody Book Shop and Beer Stube and listen very, very hard to the first winds of autumn, you may hear echoes of a ragtime piano, or H. L. Mencken ordering another round, or even the slither of the cards as Dantini the Magician performs his magic act for the last time.In a kind of exquisite irony, the demolition of the Charles Street landmark began on the first day of this year's Baltimore Book Festival. First to be razed was the Viennese Brauhaus Siegfried Weisberger had created in 1933 at the rear of his shop, making it probably the first bookstore in America with its own tap room, its own Bierstube.
NEWS
May 20, 1996
Coffee and pastry at the Pratt?Recently, I was in Chicago attending a business convention. Having to kill time before my plane left, I sauntered over to the Chicago Public Library in downtown for some relaxation. There I did a little browsing, some shopping (I bought an anthology of short stories for 7which I read on the way home), and even spent time hob-nobbing with some locals just outside of a coffee bar.Perhaps people might find what I did to be rather unusual, but at the Chicago Public Library it's really quite an easy thing to do. On the library's ground floor are a gift shop for bibliophiles and non-bibliophiles, a used book shop and a coffee bar featuring at least 10 different kinds of coffee and an assortment of pastries.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 1998
WE ARE losing an old friend in the community. Toomey's Bookshop in the Shipley Linthicum Shopping Center on Camp Meade Road is closing its doors Saturday. We have been lucky to have such a store. Local people stopped in frequently to see what new books had been added. Or they picked up a used one at a resonable price. But shoppers would also come from distances if they were particularly interested in the Civil War or another military confrontation. Daniel Toomey, Ferndale resident and owner of the shop, is author and publisher of five books on Baltimore's and Maryland's participation in the Civil War. "Opening a book shop is something I always wanted to do. I tried it and I truly enjoyed it, especially the first three and four years," said Toomey.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | October 5, 1997
THE DEMOLITION contractors are now wrecking one of Baltimore's most celebrated literary addresses, 913 N. Charles St. While too young to have frequented the legendary Peabody Book Shop -- and its famous beer stube -- in the days when it was owned by Siegfried Weisberger, I did spend many an afternoon in his fine company.I never knew the Baltimore institution he established in the days when this grand Austrian gentleman, said to have resembled character actor Jean Hersholt, presided over his coffee, beer and sandwich room set back deep in the narrow basement of a rather musty and confined book-crammed shop.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1997
BALTIMORE'S HISTORIC Peabody Book Shop and Beer Stube will soon fall to the wrecker's ball, in the wake of an admission by its owners that they are guilty of the criminal charge of demolition by neglect.One year after Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation refused to grant a demolition permit for the three-story building at 913 N. Charles St., city housing inspectors have determined that the structure has deteriorated so much that it poses a threat to public safety and must come down.
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