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By Brian D. Weese and By Brian D. Weese,Special to the Sun | January 21, 2001
"Book Business: Publishing: Past, Present, and Future," by Jason Epstein. W.W. Norton. 188 pages. $21.95 With more than a half-century of experience in book publishing, encompassing its heights as a clubby, small-scale, gentlemanly industry to its decline into abject commercialism, Jason Epstein is well-positioned to offer intriguing insights and commentary about the state of American publishing. In this well-written book that evolved from a series of lectures given by Mr. Epstein at the New York Public Library in October 1999, he avoids the gossip that is typical of many "insiders'" recollections and takes the industry to task for the declining quality of what is published today.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 14, 2011
Sondra Elise Banfield Dailey, a book publisher who had been active in the 1960s civil rights movement, died of cancer Feb. 27 at her son's Canton home. She was 66. Born Sondra Elise Banfield in Baltimore, she lived on Springdale Avenue and was a 1962 graduate of Forest Park High School, where she was cheerleading captain. Her father was a Provident Hospital physician; her mother was a social worker and political activist. "Sondra was the first black cheerleading captain to hold that position, and it was the tradition that she would become homecoming queen.
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NEWS
By CARLIN ROMANO and CARLIN ROMANO,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | June 4, 2006
WASHINGTON -- If a handful of editors and marketing people make a right turn at a big publishing convention and no one hears it, did they make a peep? Hardly. On a recent Saturday afternoon at the huge new Convention Center here, filled to capacity by that massive annual trade show of the book business called BEA (BookExpo America), a group of conservative editors and sales execs took a chance. They gathered in their chosen venue, Room 203AB, for a panel on "Selling and Promoting Right of Center Books Via Left of Center Channels."
NEWS
By Lauren Shull and Lauren Shull,Sun reporter | May 25, 2008
Gregg Wilhelm stands in front of a large metal cabinet in a classroom full of computers, proudly displaying the books that his students have published. It's an eclectic mix, ranging from poetry to wine guides to a translation of the diaries of a second-century Christian martyr. Wilhelm makes his living off the printed word. In addition to helping run Loyola College's student-staffed educational publishing house, Apprentice House, he is founder and CEO of the CityLit Project. At Apprentice, students learn to develop projects and design and market books.
NEWS
September 1, 1999
Joan R. Braden,77, a hostess to and confidante of Washington's political heavyweights and senior government officials for more than three decades, died of a heart attack Monday in Washington.Mrs. Braden performed those roles as she raised eight children, a story her husband, columnist Tom Braden, chronicled in the book "Eight is Enough," which became an ABC television series from 1977 to 1981.Evelyn Shrifte,98, a longtime president of Vanguard Press, which published the first books of Saul Bellow and Dr. Seuss, died Aug. 8 in New York.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2000
Somewhere outside Stephen Heaver Jr.'s basement in Roland Park, the electronic book revolution continues. Somewhere booksellers expand into the e-book market, publishers offer more titles in software, writers put stories and novels directly online, electronics stores busily proffer the latest e-book reader gizmos for Christmas. Somewhere far, far away. Down the narrow wooden steps and under the low ceiling on Woodlawn Road, book publishing goes on much as it did more than a century ago. Down here a book is still a book, a tactile and visual experience, an object to be admired in the hand as one might admire a Limoges tureen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | January 7, 2001
Albrecht Durer was the greatest German artist of the Renaissance, a powerful personality endowed with amazing technical facility and an obsession with his own genius rivaling that of his great Italian contemporary Leonardo da Vinci. To the people who bought his works, Durer's woodcuts and engravings were little short of miraculous. Durer's prints based on scenes from the Bible and classical myth were rendered with such meticulously realistic detail that to 16th-century viewers, they probably seemed more factual records of events than fruits of an artist's fancy.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | December 1, 1991
Richard Chizmar's dream come true was born of that from which nightmares are made: horror, mystery and suspense.The 25-year-old publisher of Cemetery Dance, a quarterly short story magazine that publishes horror, mystery and suspense fiction, has won the 1991 World Fantasy Award -- the most prestigious honor in science fiction, fantasy and horror writing."
NEWS
By Robert Reno | November 30, 1998
LITERATE people tend to worry that Americans will all become so glued to the Internet and to 800 channels of television that their reading skills will atrophy to the level of baboons.Given the state of book publishing and its retail collaborators, might we sooner worry that they will all be reading trashy junk or that their books will be preselected by such arbiters as Oprah Winfrey and Donald Imus?Years ago we used to dream of an America in which bookstores would be as common as fast-food restaurants.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | November 26, 1998
FIVE people have lined up, expecting me to sign their copies of the book. Well, one is empty-handed; he probably just wants to talk baseball. The first two are a pair, mother with a child of about 6. Mom speaks:"Inscribe this one to Rollo here. He'll like it later on."The kid has other ideas: "I'm hungry, Mom. Let's go eat."I sit there at a folding table provided by the bookstore, pen in hand, other hand receiving book from customer, third hand pounding my forehead. A funzy, maybe, about food for thought, and thought for food?
FEATURES
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | June 21, 2006
A disclosure statement on the "Operation EMU" home page gets right to the conspiracy-theory point: The Web site (operationemu.com) is a collection of odds and ends "related to the alleged 1974 NASA experiment during which an entire Hollywood film crew, contracted by the government, disappeared in a remote section of Nevada." Travis and Mabel Mountjoy vanished, too. The 17-year-old twins from Rockville -- child-prodigy physics students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- assumed leadership of an obscure Maryland research organization founded by their late father.
NEWS
By CARLIN ROMANO and CARLIN ROMANO,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | June 4, 2006
WASHINGTON -- If a handful of editors and marketing people make a right turn at a big publishing convention and no one hears it, did they make a peep? Hardly. On a recent Saturday afternoon at the huge new Convention Center here, filled to capacity by that massive annual trade show of the book business called BEA (BookExpo America), a group of conservative editors and sales execs took a chance. They gathered in their chosen venue, Room 203AB, for a panel on "Selling and Promoting Right of Center Books Via Left of Center Channels."
FEATURES
By CAROLE GOLDBERG and CAROLE GOLDBERG,HARTFORD COURANT | October 25, 2005
Americans love everything new, the latest scoop, brand-new names, fresh ideas. But sometimes when it comes to reading, the hot new thing may be a great old book. When a major film adaptation or anniversary brings a classic back into the spotlight, publishers have the opportunity to recapture its earlier audience and attract new readers by "rebranding" it. Through reprints with freshly designed covers adorned with movie images, or a banner proclaiming the anniversary edition or tie-ins to other works by that author, they can make something old seem new again and further enhance an author's reputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun Staff | August 19, 2001
So, you want to write a book? Don't do it. This I have learned in a hard-working year as assistant to The Sun's book editor, helping screen thousands of books that yearn to be reviewed. For most books, chances of success are slim. Maybe you are one of the lucky few blessed with literary genius. Then you can ignore me. Go write. Some of history's greatest literature has been rejected by the market only to be vindicated by time. If your writing is going to change the world, go for it. But don't expect it to be easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brian D. Weese and By Brian D. Weese,Special to the Sun | January 21, 2001
"Book Business: Publishing: Past, Present, and Future," by Jason Epstein. W.W. Norton. 188 pages. $21.95 With more than a half-century of experience in book publishing, encompassing its heights as a clubby, small-scale, gentlemanly industry to its decline into abject commercialism, Jason Epstein is well-positioned to offer intriguing insights and commentary about the state of American publishing. In this well-written book that evolved from a series of lectures given by Mr. Epstein at the New York Public Library in October 1999, he avoids the gossip that is typical of many "insiders'" recollections and takes the industry to task for the declining quality of what is published today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | January 7, 2001
Albrecht Durer was the greatest German artist of the Renaissance, a powerful personality endowed with amazing technical facility and an obsession with his own genius rivaling that of his great Italian contemporary Leonardo da Vinci. To the people who bought his works, Durer's woodcuts and engravings were little short of miraculous. Durer's prints based on scenes from the Bible and classical myth were rendered with such meticulously realistic detail that to 16th-century viewers, they probably seemed more factual records of events than fruits of an artist's fancy.
FEATURES
By Newsday | January 13, 1993
NEW YORK -- Bill Clinton against George Bush was a "His" and "Hers" campaign for James Carville and Mary Matalin, the odd romantic couple of American politics. He was the top strategist for the victor; she was the deputy campaign manager for the president.Now that the ballroom balloons have all burst and the two have finished a European vacation, they are pitching a hotly sought book about the election and the love that survived it.In a blitz of meetings with New York publishers and editors late last week -- on Thursday, they did business over breakfast, lunch and dinner -- Mr. Carville and Ms. Matalin proposed writing tales from inside their respective bunkers, leavened by recollections of their own relationship on the run. They showed the book people a proposed outline -- but not to keep, lest the dozen or so pages be leaked to the media.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | July 21, 1994
A generation ago, when printing still involved hot lead and the ability to read type upside down, a publisher was a person of rare power and influence. The information highway of that day was a narrow road, and a handful of publishers controlled access to it.But today, a salutary result of the ongoing revolution in communications is that anyone who wants to can be a publisher. Just as talk radio has opened the airwaves to one and all, technology has democratized the printed page, and books, magazines, newsletters and small-circulation newspapers stream from thousands of little presses at an astounding rate.
NEWS
December 28, 2000
WHAT WAS WRONG for former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is wrong for Sen.-elect Hillary Rodham Clinton, too. Ms. Clinton is off to a promising career as freshman senator from New York. She brings a razor-sharp mind, passion for issues and unique insights as life partner to a governor-president. So why smear the clean slate with a major blemish at the start? Ms. Clinton took an $8 million advance for a promised memoir of her White House years from Simon & Schuster. The publisher is a subsidiary of Viacom Inc., which also owns CBS, MTV, Comedy Central, Infinity Broadcasting, Paramount Pictures, Famous Music Publishing, Blockbuster Video and a bunch of movie screens, Web sites and theme parks.
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