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By Dave Rosenthal | March 20, 2013
The lineup for the 10th annual CityLit Festival is set, so Baltimore-area book lovers should mark April 13 on calendars. The event, held at the central branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library , offers a full day of author readings, panel discussions and how-to sessions, as well as a literary marketplace. It's organized each year by a dedicated group from the library and the CityLit Project, which is headed by Gregg Wilhelm. This year's fiction headliner is George Saunders, whose short story collections include "In Persuasion Nation," "CivilWarLand in Bad Decline" and his newest, "Tenth of December.
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By Dave Rosenthal | March 20, 2013
Authors Bill Bryson and Doris Kearns Goodwin are among the headliners for the 2013-14 Baltimore Speakers Series, part of a lineup that is sure to delight book lovers. Bryson, whose "In a Sunburned Country" is one of my favorites, will appear Sept. 30 to start the series sponsored by Stevenson University. His humorous style has won him a loyal folllowing, and his travel books are must-reads. Among his other gems are "Neither Here Nor There" -- which is on my nightstand right now -- "A Walk in the Woods" and "A Short History of Nearly Everything.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 24, 2013
Save the date: The Enoch Pratt Library's 25th annual Booklovers' Breakfast , featuring acclaimed author Terry McMillan , is coming up on Saturday, Feb. 9. She was the speaker at the first event, and is coming back for the big anniversary. The event runs from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Tickets are $50 per person or $450 for a table of 10. McMillan's tales, which include " Waiting to Exhale, " "How Stella Got Her Groove Back" and "Getting to Happy," have been enjoyed by million in book form and screen adaptations.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 20, 2013
The lineup for the 10th annual CityLit Festival is set, so Baltimore-area book lovers should mark April 13 on calendars. The event, held at the central branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library , offers a full day of author readings, panel discussions and how-to sessions, as well as a literary marketplace. It's organized each year by a dedicated group from the library and the CityLit Project, which is headed by Gregg Wilhelm. This year's fiction headliner is George Saunders, whose short story collections include "In Persuasion Nation," "CivilWarLand in Bad Decline" and his newest, "Tenth of December.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 8, 2013
With Valentine's Day approaching, it's a good time to review some of the literary love stories that have been set in Baltimore. In an article in the latest issue of the Sun magazine, reporter Jill Rosen highlights the relationships of H.L. Mencken, Edgar Allan Poe and F. Scott Fitzgerald -- all three of which ended in tragedy. Here are excerpts from that article. -- Sara Powell Haardt ... understood Mencken's commitment to his work. He appreciated her independence. They were two level-headed agnostics who loved Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
Baltimore's book festival got here first. Organizers of the 16th annual Baltimore Book Festival, which opens Friday, say they aren't fazed that a larger, glitzier, more star-studded event is being held on the exact same weekend just 40 miles to the south. They aren't concerned that the upstart National Book Festival will feature celebrity authors the likes of actress Julianne Moore, or that the Washington extravaganza is expanding this year from one day to two. But not everyone is as gracious.
FEATURES
By The Hartford Courant | October 12, 1998
Book lovers shouldn't have much trouble remembering the name of a new magazine devoted to books.It's called Book, and the premier issue (October/November, $4.95) is now on newsstands.Book isn't highbrow; rather it's accessible, brightly produced and geared toward people who are "passionate about books." It's produced by a New Jersey firm, West Egg Communications, headed by publisher Mark Gleason.The first issue is heavy on author profiles. There's a piece on Tom Wolfe (who appears on the cover)
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2002
For audio book lovers, technological advances are making those cumbersome boxes of cassettes a relic. Now, books can be heard through devices no bigger than a deck of cards - and Carroll County public libraries are the first in Maryland to have them. "What boggles my mind is the amount of information that can be stored on something so small," said Kris Peters, a librarian at the county's North Carroll branch who was among the first to test digital audio books on an MP3 player. The county's five branches have been testing the waters with the new MP3 players - which can play up to 26 hours of the spoken word - since June.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1997
Taimak Holland, 10, has about 14 unread books waiting at home. Still, the Randallstown boy attached himself to a table of smooth hardcovers in front of the Washington Monument yesterday until his father came up with the cash."
NEWS
By Joanne C. Broadwater and Joanne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 2002
For children who struggle with the reading disorder known as dyslexia, a library might seem like an intimidating place. But at the Jemicy School in Baltimore County, children with dyslexia tumble eagerly into the world of books. Fresh from their classrooms, they hurry into the reading room where librarian John Clayton is waiting to share a story. They take off their shoes and nestle in oversized pillows beneath a picture window that frames a view of the school's scenic campus in Owings Mills.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 4, 2013
Book lovers in the Baltimore-Washington area should circle September on their calendars, to save dates for a pair of big festivals. The Library of Congress National Book Festival will be held Sept. 21 and 22 on the mall in Washington. The event always attracts an all-star lineup of authors, poets and illustrators. In 2012, featured authors included T.C. Boyle, Geraldine Brooks, Junot Diaz, Patricia Cornwell and Jeff Kinney. The Baltimore Book Festival will follow a week later in the city's Mt. Vernon neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 8, 2013
With Valentine's Day approaching, it's a good time to review some of the literary love stories that have been set in Baltimore. In an article in the latest issue of the Sun magazine, reporter Jill Rosen highlights the relationships of H.L. Mencken, Edgar Allan Poe and F. Scott Fitzgerald -- all three of which ended in tragedy. Here are excerpts from that article. -- Sara Powell Haardt ... understood Mencken's commitment to his work. He appreciated her independence. They were two level-headed agnostics who loved Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | February 6, 2013
Book lovers have a new source for finding good reads: Bookish , a new website created by Hachette, Penguin and Simon & Schuster. The site, which kicked off today, offers articles, reading recommendations and options to buy books through Amazon, Barnes & Noble and other sources. Though it was bankrolled by the three publishers, the site promises to highlight a much wider array of books in its magazine-like style. Today, Elizabeth Gilbert takes issue with Philip Roth and other authors who have complained that the writing life is too grueling.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 24, 2013
Save the date: The Enoch Pratt Library's 25th annual Booklovers' Breakfast , featuring acclaimed author Terry McMillan , is coming up on Saturday, Feb. 9. She was the speaker at the first event, and is coming back for the big anniversary. The event runs from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Tickets are $50 per person or $450 for a table of 10. McMillan's tales, which include " Waiting to Exhale, " "How Stella Got Her Groove Back" and "Getting to Happy," have been enjoyed by million in book form and screen adaptations.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2012
Mary Morton moved away from Baltimore earlier this year but returned on Sunday for the city's annual book festival. Morton, who now lives in Hagerstown, has attended almost every Baltimore Book Festival since its inception in 1996. The festival has gotten bigger every year, she said, and more crowded. On a sunny Sunday, Morton and a friend browsed through used books in Mount Vernon and listened to presentations by authors, including broadcast journalist Amy Goodman and Baltimore-born "chick-lit" novelist Emily Giffin.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
Mary Hastler knew she was about to create a fuss, knew that, unfair as she might find it, people were going to label her the last thing a librarian wants to be called — censor. You don't refuse to carry the most talked-about series of books in the country without anyone noticing. But as she read E.L. James' erotic novel, "Fifty Shades of Grey," on her iPad, Hastler couldn't reconcile its words with the Harford County Public Library's policy not to buy pornography. Hastler, the county's library director, says she has no problem with your run-of-the-mill bodice-ripper.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1997
The bookworm has turned.A year after starting a publishing phenomenon that has sent eight books to the top of the best-seller lists, Oprah Winfrey angered some of her most faithful book club members this week by giving short shrift to the latest selection, "Songs In Ordinary Time" by Mary McGarry Morris."
FEATURES
By Terry Conway and Terry Conway,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 1998
Deep in Pennsylvania's enchanting Brandywine Valley sits a treasure for passionate book lovers - Baldwin's Book Barn. Founded 50 years ago, Baldwin's resides in a rustic, stone dairy barn stuffed to the rafters with a trove of 300,000 used, fine and rare books. They are piled in stacks, in glass cases, in orange crates, on tables and in bookcases lining the stairwells that snake through the five-story labyrinth of rooms in the 1822 structure.Volumes of stories fill not only the bookshelves, but also the shop's past.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | April 12, 2012
I'm getting psyched to meet and introduce Walter Isaacson, author of the bestselling Steve Jobs biography, at the CityLit Festival in Baltimore this Saturday ! Are you going? It's an all day affair for book lovers. Or, if you want to just see Walter, come by at 3 pm, at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Central Branch . I read Isaacson's book last fall and it was a big influence, in a very personal way, on my life. As some of you know, I've been plotting my own little startup venture, with an app called NestPix.com . Reading about all the hurdles that Jobs overcame -- multiple bouts with catastrophic failure -- and learning about how he learned to trust his intuitution...Well, this was a message delivered at the right time for me. Steve Jobs didn't strike me as a man who had a lot of self-doubt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
Baltimore's book festival got here first. Organizers of the 16th annual Baltimore Book Festival, which opens Friday, say they aren't fazed that a larger, glitzier, more star-studded event is being held on the exact same weekend just 40 miles to the south. They aren't concerned that the upstart National Book Festival will feature celebrity authors the likes of actress Julianne Moore, or that the Washington extravaganza is expanding this year from one day to two. But not everyone is as gracious.
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