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FEATURES
May 9, 2014
The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is hosting a book fair this weekend that will highlight books about African Americans as well as showcase African American authors and illustrators. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake gives a reading at 2:00. "It's critical to have books and role models that reflect young readers," said the museum's executive director, Skipp Sanders. "Otherwise, the risk becomes that our next generation grows up feeling invisible, and it becomes that much harder for them to build a positive self-image at a critical time in development.
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NEWS
September 30, 2014
I attended the Baltimore Book Festival on Saturday and was pleased with the Inner Harbor location ( "Book Festival gets positive reviews on Inner Harbor move," Sept. 27). As opposed to the Mt. Vernon area, there was much more room for the crowds to navigate the festival, and being close to the Harborplace restaurants was a definite plus. When the Inner Harbor was first developed there were frequent festivals on the promenade and Rash Field during the summer months. In recent years that has been lacking, and the Book Festival filled that void if only for one weekend.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
Baltimore concluded its 15th annual book festival Sunday by acknowledging a newer form of literary interaction: book blogs. "Anything and everything to do with technology is definitely a hot topic," said Tracy Baskerville, spokeswoman for the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, which produces the festival. "You'll be seeing even more next year. " Baskerville predicted panels devoted to e-books and more about the social media literary forums that enable book lovers to interact with authors.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The Baltimore Book Festival, once an annual staple in Mount Vernon Square, is smack dab in the touristy Inner Harbor this year, a move that got mostly positive reviews Saturday. Some who took part in the festival in Mount Vernon say they miss the venue and add that it's too early to say which is better. Others thought that featuring the festival at the harbor would give tourists a good impression of the city. "Down here, you have people that are not just coming to the book festival.
NEWS
September 25, 1997
ONE PROMOTION for this weekend's Baltimore Book Festival II is a recipe for a mythical ''Festival Melange.'' It goes: Take two days of sunshine, seven storybook characters, 20 poetry readings, 10 arts and crafts, dozens of author signings, etc., put it all together in Mount Vernon Place and serve 35,000 people. That's what happened last year, and it certainly made for an appetizing concoction, even with the occasional sprinkle.This year's festival should be even better, especially in attendance, as word has spread throughout the region about the first affair.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
Starting tomorrow, more than 150 authors will descend on Mount Vernon to talk about their craft. We've highlighted several here. Anne Garrels National Public Radio war correspondent Anne Garrels was one of the 16 American reporters who stayed in Baghdad last year during the U.S.-led battle for the city. She initially had no plans to write about her experiences there, but when she returned to the States she was shocked by the reception she received. "I was taste of the week when I came back; I had no idea," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2005
SCHEDULE HIGHLIGHTS This weekend's events run the gamut from spoken-word poetry to book signings to musical performances and more. For a complete list, see baltimorebookfestival.com. MUSIC STAGE Tomorrow 5 p.m. -- LVT, acoustic rock 6:15 p.m. -- David Bach, contemporary jazz 7:45 p.m. -- Unity Reggae Band, reggae Saturday 11:30 a.m. -- Mambo Combo, soco/sambo 1 p.m. -- Almost Recess, a cappella 2:30 p.m. -- Charles "Big Daddy" Stallings, blues 4 p.m. -- Marc A. Evans, R&B/soul 5:45 p.m. -- The Players, ska/reggae Sunday 11:30 a.m. -- Rude Dog, blues 1:30 p.m. -- Chopteeth, Afro-funk 3 p.m. -- Melanie Mason, acoustic blues 4:30 p.m. -- Junkyard Saints, zydeco 6 p.m. -- The Carl Filipiak Group, contemporary jazz CITY LIT STAGE Tomorrow 5 p.m. -- Reception 6 p.m. -- "Camera Stories: Photographs & Narratives" featuring t.p. Luce, thaBloc, John Slaughter, Brother in the Bush Saturday 11 a.m. -- Maryland Writers Association Novel and Short Works Contest Winners 12:15 p.m. -- Jack Fruchtman, Atlantic Cousins: Benjamin Franklin and His Visionary Friends 1 p.m. -- Paul Mandelbaum, Garrett in Wedlock 1:45 p.m. -- Buzz Williams, Spare Parts 2:30 p.m. -- Masha Hamilton, The Distance Between Us and Staircase of a Thousand Steps 3:15 p.m. -- Writers on Publishing 4:30 p.m. -- Matt Bondurant, The Third Translation 5:15 p.m. -- Litapalooza, music and reading Sunday 11 a.m. -- Nurturing the Culture of Literature: What Is CityLit?
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 25, 1997
Traffic on Charles Street at Mount Vernon will be diverted during the rush hour tomorrow, starting at 6 p.m. until Monday at 6 a.m., because of the second Baltimore Book Festival.Friday night commuters are advised to use Calvert Street as an alternate route north, according to the city's Department of Public Works.The two-day book festival will be Saturday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. Outdoor booths on Mount Vernon will be set up for readings, book browsing and cooking demonstrations.
NEWS
September 13, 2007
A daylong book festival is scheduled for Saturday at the Waverly branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 E. 33rd St. The event, sponsored by Friends of the Waverly Branch, will be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. A variety of activities are planned, including stories, crafts and face painting for children from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., a writing workshop for teens from noon to 2 p.m., a presentation of telling stories through poetry from Maryland poet laureate Michael...
NEWS
September 28, 1997
Three blocks from the Baltimore Book Festival II, the city's literary set had little to cheer about yesterday.A demolition contractor hired by the city chose yesterday to begin tearing down the historic Peabody Book Shop and Beer Stube at 913 N. Charles St., a former speakeasy and gathering place patronized by such writers as F. Scott Fitzgerald and H. L. Mencken."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore children's book author Elisabeth Dahl used to walk two or three miles just so she could hang out at the Library of Congress, reveling in the Paris Opera House style-architecture, the 23-karat gold-plated dome and the breathtakingly extensive archives that includes the personal papers of Thomas Jefferson. Dahl married a librarian who works now at Towson University, and the couple celebrated their wedding in the Enoch Pratt Free Library . So 45-year-old writer couldn't be more thrilled that her first published book, a children's novel called "Genie Wishes," was chosen to represent the State of Maryland at the 14 t h annual Library of Congress National Book Festival on Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
The 2014 Baltimore Book Festival will feature a lineup that includes a National Book Award-winning author, a novelist whose previous work was made into an Academy Award-nominated film, a popular sports broadcaster and a food writer who has penned a memoir with recipes. Highlights of the 19 t h festival, which will be held from Sept. 26-28, were announced Tuesday in a news release by the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts. Featured authors and books will include: former National Book Award winner Alice McDermott reading from her most recent novel, "Someone," an elegant tone poem that traces the life of an ordinary woman; Andre Dubus III's highly praised collection of four novellas, "Dirty Love"; the father-son memoir "Forgotten Sundays" penned by WBAL-TV sports director Gerry Sandusky; and "Slices of Life," by food writer Leah Eskin, whose column runs in The Baltimore Sun's Wednesday Taste section.
FEATURES
May 9, 2014
The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is hosting a book fair this weekend that will highlight books about African Americans as well as showcase African American authors and illustrators. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake gives a reading at 2:00. "It's critical to have books and role models that reflect young readers," said the museum's executive director, Skipp Sanders. "Otherwise, the risk becomes that our next generation grows up feeling invisible, and it becomes that much harder for them to build a positive self-image at a critical time in development.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
The Baltimore Book Festival is moving a few blocks south for its fall 2014 edition, to accommodate the renovation of the Washington Monument. This year, more than 200 authors and 100 exhibitors and sellers will pitch their booths at the Inner Harbor Sept. 26-28, according to a spokeswoman for the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, which runs the festival. For the past 18 years, the festival has set up shop in Mount Vernon Square. But restoration work on the monument, which began in January, has made navigating the square a challenge even without thousands of additional visitors.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
The Baltimore Book Festival in Mount Vernon this weekend will contribute to congestion and delays for commuters in the city this weekend, as multiple road and lane closures are and will be in effect through Monday, according to city transportation officials. The festival, which features hundreds of authors and book signings as well as more than 100 exhibitors and booksellers, runs from noon to 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and from noon to 7 p.m. on Sunday. Residents and commuters are urged to plan ahead.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Food for Thought stage at next weekend's Baltimore Book Festival will present a full slate of talks and demonstrations by Baltimore-based chefs and visiting cookbook authors. Among the locals are Johnny's barista Lindsay DiFabbio (1 p.m. Friday), caterer and former restaurateur Connie Crabtree-Burritt (noon Sept. 28) and Bradley Willits, executive chef at the B&O American Brasserie (noon Sept. 29 ). The most recognizable names among the visiting authors are not necessarily associated with the world of cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
The Food for Thought stage at the Baltimore Book Festival will present a full slate of talks and demonstrations by Baltimore-based chefs and visiting cookbook authors. Among the locals are Johnny's barista Lindsay DiFabbio (1 p.m. Friday), caterer and former restaurateur Connie Crabtree-Burritt (noon Saturday) and Bradley Willits, executive chef at the B&O American Brasserie (noon Sunday). The most recognizable names among the visiting authors are not necessarily associated with the world of cooking.
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