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NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Two weeks of relative peace dissolved in the House yesterday as peevish lawmakers roared and postured for more than three chaotic hours in an argument born of Speaker Newt Gingrich's controversial book deal."
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The flowering branches of Mulan magnolia that grace the cover of Joan Lok's new book on Chinese brush painting appear more brightly colored than in her original work, probably to catch the eye of someone browsing in a bookstore, guesses the author. The Columbia resident says she is pleased with the quality of paper used for the book and the way the reproductions of her original flower paintings neatly fit with the detailed instructions on the soft-cover book's 128 pages. And the longtime federal employee is also happy her first how-to book will be available at bookshops and at a local chain of craft stores, tapping into a marketing niche.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 24, 2000
BOSTON -- Mind you, the pope got half-a-million bucks more for his book. But then John Paul II is infallible, which was worth something extra. Besides, anyone who published the pontiff could figure that if the book didn't make back the advance -- and it didn't -- the company still had better access to Paradise. What exactly was Simon & Schuster, the child of Viacom, praying for when the publishers anted up some 8 million bucks for the memoirs of Hillary Rodham Clinton? A marketing miracle?
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
Jill Smokler just might be Baltimore's biggest unknown celebrity. Few recognize her tightly coiled curls, her peanut-butter-eating children, her tired dog. But online, thousands upon thousands of mothers grasp onto her every word. And on Twitter, nearly 155,000 people follow her, more, by far, than Baltimore's mayor, Maryland's governor, chef Duff Goldman and the Ravens' Ray Lewis - together. In the virtual world she's a well-known and influential voice. Yet in the real one, you'd walk right past her in Whole Foods without realizing.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As he tries to focus attention on his "Contract with America," House Speaker Newt Gingrich is finding the spotlight inexorably fixed on his contract with the HarperCollins publishing house for a lucrative book deal.Dominating his morning news conference yesterday, igniting fireworks on the House floor Wednesday, and spiraling out this week to touch off partisan feuds and tirades, the book deal is clouding what Mr. Gingrich hoped would be the triumphant opening weeks of his reign.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 10, 1995
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-Ga., defending the publication of the book that has helped vault him into the realm of presidential politics, said yesterday he will seek an open hearing of the House Ethics Committee investigating the propriety of the business arrangement he struck with publishing magnate Rupert Murdoch."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1996
PUEBLO, Colo. -- White House aides said yesterday it is now apparent that Dick Morris, President Clinton's former strategist and pollster, deceived Clinton about his plans to write a book on his role as a presidential adviser.Morris, the aides say, repeatedly refused this year to sign a new consulting contract with the Clinton-Gore campaign that contained a confidentiality clause barring him from kiss-and-tell.No sooner did Morris resign last month after a tabloid reported that he had had a yearlong relationship with a $200-an-hour prostitute, than word came that he had signed a contract with Random House to tell his story.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | September 22, 2002
KATE REDDY and I have a great deal in common. We are both strung-out, time-starved, guilt-ridden working mothers with husbands whose idea of picking up the house before a party is to straighten the paint can shelf in the garage. Our children resent our leaving for work and punish us upon our return. Our husbands don't seem to understand that items left on the bottom step are meant to be carried upstairs. Neither of us dares utter these forbidden words in front of a boss: "child" and "leave early."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Responding to growing bipartisan criticism, Speaker-to-be Newt Gingrich is expected to announce today that he will give up a substantial portion of the $4.5 million advance payment he was to receive as part of a book deal struck earlier this month."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a way, it's too bad that the Republican and Democratic parties don't settle things the way it's done in the international spy business. That is, when each side catches the other spying, they simply swap the spies they've caught and forget about it.This thought comes to mind in the current dust-up over House Speaker Newt Gingrich's $4.5 million book deal, changed in the face of Democratic sniping to a straight royalties arrangement, which could yield him just as much in the end.The Democrats, led by House Minority Whip David Bonior, are continuing to flail Gingrich in the wake of disclosures that he met with publisher Rupert Murdoch and his lobbyist at a time when Murdoch's lucrative television interests are being challenged before the Federal Communications Commission.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2010
When her family was thinking about moving to Texas three years ago, Maggie Mei Lewis, then barely in her teens, so wanted to stay in Maryland that she hatched a seemingly far-fetched plan. "I thought, 'I'll write a book, and I'll make enough money to stay here,' " says Lewis, 16, who lives in Turkey Point. She still hasn't earned enough to be independent, but the result of her labors — "Moonlight Memoirs: Remembering That Family and Friends Are Forever," a richly illustrated children's book — recently took first prize in the spirituality category of the Next Generation Indie Book Awards, a competition for self-published authors around the world.
SPORTS
By Justin Fenton and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 25, 2010
As Michael Oher made his way around the room signing footballs, T-shirts, napkins - anything his young fans could get their hands on - he told them that he always wanted a better life. "So the movie was really about you?" one teenage girl asked. "Yeah," the Ravens offensive lineman replied, reaching across the table to sign a piece of paper. "It was rough. " Oher's story, portrayed in the book and movie "The Blind Side," has inspired millions, and on Monday he visited the Arrow Child and Family Ministries in Parkville to meet about 70 children going through similar challenges.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2005
There's no telling when instant fame will strike next. It happened to massage therapist Amber Frey and Army soldier Jessica Lynch in 2003. Nine Pennsylvania coal miners endured it in 2002 and Air Force pilot Scott O'Grady emerged from it a courageous hero in 1995. This week, add Ashley Smith to those ranks. The 26-year-old widowed mother in Atlanta went from total unknown to in-demand celebrity after persuading her captor Brian G. Nichols to set her free after a seven-hour hostage ordeal last weekend.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2004
WASHINGTON - Bob Barnett, the lawyer who staged the publicity onslaught for Bill Clinton's memoir, is so media-savvy that as soon as a reporter enters his suite at the law firm of Williams & Connolly he imposes a caveat. "The office," he says, "is off the record." Not what is said in the office, but the physical space itself. Barnett is familiar with those newspaper profiles that use descriptions of mementos and photographs in an attempt to reveal more of the subject, and he's having none of it. If anyone is going to speak for Barnett, it'll be the lawyer himself.
NEWS
BY SUN STAFF WRITERS | June 19, 2003
Montgomery County Police Chief Charles A. Moose, the anguished lawman who was the public face of the sniper manhunt last fall, has resigned because a county ethics board would not allow him to parlay his fame into book and movie deals. Moose broke the news to his staunchest supporter, County Executive Douglas M. Duncan, over veal and Diet Cokes at a Rockville restaurant Monday night. The resignation becomes effective June 28, less than a year after Moose rose to hero status for his calming presence during the sniper attacks.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
Montgomery County Police Chief Charles Moose, the reluctant celebrity who led the chase for the serial snipers and calmed a nation of jittery TV viewers, will tell his story in a book to be released in the fall and has agreed to consult for a television movie, his agent announced yesterday. The book is tentatively titled Three Weeks in October: The Manhunt for the D.C. Sniper and will be published by Dutton. Two TV production companies bought the rights to Moose's life story, but there is no guarantee the movie will be made.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- House Democrats stepped up their attack on Newt Gingrich's ethics and credibility yesterday after learning that the new speaker met privately last fall with media magnate Rupert Murdoch, days before Mr. Murdoch's publishing house made a $4.5 million book deal with the Republican leader."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 18, 1995
NEW YORK -- In a sharp reversal of its bitter campaign to thwart the expansion of the Fox television network, NBC agreed yesterday to cease its effort to deny Fox licenses for broadcast stations in seven cities.NBC said it had reached a potentially lucrative agreement with Fox Chairman Rupert Murdoch to have two NBC-owned cable channels distributed over Murdoch's Star Television system, which delivers programs by satellite to homes in Asia.NBC decided to end its bitter dispute with Fox because, said NBC President Robert C. Wright, "we have accomplished everything we set out to do."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2003
Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas has agreed to sell HarperCollins the rights to publish the memoir of his rise from poverty for an advance of $1.5 million, people involved in the deal said yesterday. The advance appeared to be the highest ever paid for a book by a sitting justice of the Supreme Court. Justices have often written books from the bench, then recused themselves from matters involving their publishers as a potential conflict of interest. But Thomas' gripping life story and his politically charged judicial career generated a singular level of attention and debate in the publishing world.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | September 22, 2002
KATE REDDY and I have a great deal in common. We are both strung-out, time-starved, guilt-ridden working mothers with husbands whose idea of picking up the house before a party is to straighten the paint can shelf in the garage. Our children resent our leaving for work and punish us upon our return. Our husbands don't seem to understand that items left on the bottom step are meant to be carried upstairs. Neither of us dares utter these forbidden words in front of a boss: "child" and "leave early."
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