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NEWS
By Georgia N. Alexakis and Georgia N. Alexakis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Under normal circumstances, any U.S. senator might have felt upstaged by a pair of bears and a monkey.But when Curious George and the Berenstain Bears interrupted Sen. Slade Gorton Thursday morning on the East Lawn of the Capitol, the Republican from Washington graciously yielded the spotlight.Gorton was there to help launch Book Bank, a national book donation program, and who better to get about 40 children excited about receiving free books than the book characters themselves?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Landi, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Robbi Behr, 37, and Matthew Swanson, 38, specialize in what they call "odd, commercially nonviable picture books for adults. " The married couple quit their office jobs seven years ago to operate Idiots'books, a small, indie publishing house based out of their barn on the Eastern Shore. There, they write and illustrate their series of satirical, subscription-based novels, which they proudly displayed Friday at the Baltimore Book Festival in Mount Vernon. "Festivals like these are the best way to meet new readers," Swanson said.
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NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1996
It's home to 1.5 million books but few people know it's in town -- a slice of a huge warehouse in an industrial park.A worker down the street in Linthicum hadn't even heard of the International Book Bank Inc. (IBB).Free books on arcane subjects are normal there. But it couldn't unload 20,000 copies of a book by former Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger. No interest. They were recycled.The Book Bank, affiliated with a development agency in Canada, is as unusual a nonprofit group as any of the 4,000 tax-exempt outfits in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | May 4, 2012
There must be some sort of cosmic alignment this weekend, because just as "The Avengers" movie is released, Free Comic Book Day is upon us. I don't read comics often anymore, but I have fond memories of my parents buying a bunch for me and my sister for our two-hour family trips from Connecticut to New York. I was a super-hero fan; she leaned toward Archie. We sometimes read while curled up on the floor of the family's massive Chevrolet, in the pre-seatbelt days. (Don't try this at home.)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Baltimore Reads hopes to collect 75,000 titles at its 17th annual Books for Kids Day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the parking lot of Poly-Western High School, Falls Road and Cold Spring Lane. The nonprofit organization, dedicated to fostering literacy, will accept new or gently used books and redistribute them through its Book Bank. It collects books for Baltimore-area schools, teachers, Head Start centers, social services agencies, community organizations and needy families. Since the book bank was founded 20 years ago, more than 1.6 million books have been collected and given away.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 27, 2012
Want to do a good deed -- and clean out those books lying around the house? Head to the parking lot of Poly-Western High School next Saturday, May 5, as Baltimore Reads holds its annual Books for Kids Day. At the event, which runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., you can donate new or gently used books that will be redistributed through the organization's Book Bank. The goal: to collect 75,000 books over the coming year. The Baltimore Sun gives hundreds of books to the Book Bank each year -- stack and stacks of review copies that I don't have the time to read.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 21, 2000
The annual Baltimore Reads Books For Kids Day book collection project pulled in more than 25,000 children's books for the Baltimore-based literacy organization that operates a year-round book bank for low-income families. The book drive drew support from more than 100 groups and individuals, culminating in a drop-off May 13 at Polytechnic Institute and Western High School in Baltimore. A top contributor was Bayside Elementary School in the Queen Anne's County community of Stevensville, where two pupils - Stephanie Nhem and Caitlin Driscoll - led an effort that collected 2,300 books.
NEWS
By Tia Matthews and Tia Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1995
As Yvonne Mercer sat in a small room near Lake Clifton-Eastern High School's fire-ravaged library, the air was still filled with the stench of a January blaze that destroyed most of the books.Yesterday, the librarian at the East Baltimore school received some hope for rebuilding, as 1,000 new and used books were given to the school's temporary library, thanks to Baltimore Reads Inc., a nonprofit group that aims to end illiteracy.The Baltimore Reads Book Bank donated the books after learning of the Jan. 30 fire, which damaged the school's library, parts of the cafeteria and offices.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 23, 1999
Eight-year-old Dante Mayo exudes energy when he talks about his favorite pastime. While many children his age love baseball and video games, Dante fancies reading.As of yesterday, Dante had read 457 books -- some as long as 200 pages -- since September. Although mysteries are his favorite, the George Washington Elementary third-grader said he will read nearly anything."I like reading too much," said the small boy with big brown eyes and a serious demeanor.Dante, the youngest in a family of eight children, said, "Books are like a magnet, they are stuck to my head."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | May 30, 1996
The Red BaronThe Red Baron Biplanes will barnstorm the Carroll County Regional Airport in Westminster today and tomorrow. The red and white, smoke-trailing, super Stearman planes are original open-air cockpit types and will be available for tours. Visitors will also be able to chat with the pilots and sample some free Red Baron frozen pizza.The fly-in will benefit the Children's Cancer Foundation. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5: 30 p.m. Admission is free. Bring new and gently read books Saturday to the parking lots of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute and Western High School at Coldspring Lane and Falls Road.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Baltimore Reads hopes to collect 75,000 titles at its 17th annual Books for Kids Day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday on the parking lot of Poly-Western High School, Falls Road and Cold Spring Lane. The nonprofit organization, dedicated to fostering literacy, will accept new or gently used books and redistribute them through its Book Bank. It collects books for Baltimore-area schools, teachers, Head Start centers, social services agencies, community organizations and needy families. Since the book bank was founded 20 years ago, more than 1.6 million books have been collected and given away.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 27, 2012
Want to do a good deed -- and clean out those books lying around the house? Head to the parking lot of Poly-Western High School next Saturday, May 5, as Baltimore Reads holds its annual Books for Kids Day. At the event, which runs from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., you can donate new or gently used books that will be redistributed through the organization's Book Bank. The goal: to collect 75,000 books over the coming year. The Baltimore Sun gives hundreds of books to the Book Bank each year -- stack and stacks of review copies that I don't have the time to read.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Gardening held little appeal to Stacey Watkins, a Baltimore special-education teacher, until an organization that helps keep her classroom in books put out a call for help with an urban planting project. She soon found her manicured hands could do wonders with dirt. Within a few hours last week, Watkins, who dug unencumbered by garden gloves, had planted straight rows of broccoli, kale, cauliflower and all manner of herbs in a vacant, long-neglected lot along Park Heights Avenue.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
BLUE GRASS, Va. - When a school dies, a community loses more than classrooms and desks. Buried with them are a community center, a voting place, quite often the only library within miles. And something that can't be quantified: a slice of a community's heart. It's the story of school consolidation being played out (with little media attention) across rural America, from Westernport, Md., to Lula, Miss., to Flaxville, Mont. This pastoral village in an Allegheny valley six hours southwest of Baltimore, would be a prime example.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 21, 2000
The annual Baltimore Reads Books For Kids Day book collection project pulled in more than 25,000 children's books for the Baltimore-based literacy organization that operates a year-round book bank for low-income families. The book drive drew support from more than 100 groups and individuals, culminating in a drop-off May 13 at Polytechnic Institute and Western High School in Baltimore. A top contributor was Bayside Elementary School in the Queen Anne's County community of Stevensville, where two pupils - Stephanie Nhem and Caitlin Driscoll - led an effort that collected 2,300 books.
NEWS
By Georgia N. Alexakis and Georgia N. Alexakis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Under normal circumstances, any U.S. senator might have felt upstaged by a pair of bears and a monkey.But when Curious George and the Berenstain Bears interrupted Sen. Slade Gorton Thursday morning on the East Lawn of the Capitol, the Republican from Washington graciously yielded the spotlight.Gorton was there to help launch Book Bank, a national book donation program, and who better to get about 40 children excited about receiving free books than the book characters themselves?
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | May 4, 2012
There must be some sort of cosmic alignment this weekend, because just as "The Avengers" movie is released, Free Comic Book Day is upon us. I don't read comics often anymore, but I have fond memories of my parents buying a bunch for me and my sister for our two-hour family trips from Connecticut to New York. I was a super-hero fan; she leaned toward Archie. We sometimes read while curled up on the floor of the family's massive Chevrolet, in the pre-seatbelt days. (Don't try this at home.)
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
BLUE GRASS, Va. - When a school dies, a community loses more than classrooms and desks. Buried with them are a community center, a voting place, quite often the only library within miles. And something that can't be quantified: a slice of a community's heart. It's the story of school consolidation being played out (with little media attention) across rural America, from Westernport, Md., to Lula, Miss., to Flaxville, Mont. This pastoral village in an Allegheny valley six hours southwest of Baltimore, would be a prime example.
NEWS
April 18, 1999
Book bank strives to expose children to books, readingI applaud The Sun's April 11 article "Low-income households lack books, study finds." It rightly reported that low- income households often lack books, perpetuating a cycle of low-educational achievement that is often passed from parent to child. Research has repeatedly shown that introducing children to books at home helps them succeed in school.If Baltimore is to enable its children to read at grade level by age nine, many partners must be involved, not just the schools.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 23, 1999
Eight-year-old Dante Mayo exudes energy when he talks about his favorite pastime. While many children his age love baseball and video games, Dante fancies reading.As of yesterday, Dante had read 457 books -- some as long as 200 pages -- since September. Although mysteries are his favorite, the George Washington Elementary third-grader said he will read nearly anything."I like reading too much," said the small boy with big brown eyes and a serious demeanor.Dante, the youngest in a family of eight children, said, "Books are like a magnet, they are stuck to my head."
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