Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBoogie
IN THE NEWS

Boogie

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
Now that the election is over, you might think you've had enough of political TV. But, please, don't turn the page on TV and politics until you have seen Boogie Man: The Lee Atwater Story tonight on PBS. This finely crafted political biography dissects and explains the nastiness of U.S. politics during the past three decades like nothing I have read or viewed. The late Atwater was a top-level Republican strategist and one-time chairman of the Republican National Committee. He was the architect of George H.W. Bush's presidential victory in 1988, and he trained a generation of Republicans such as Karl Rove in the dirtiest tricks imaginable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
Aegis report | April 15, 2013
All 460 seats to the largest party of the year for Harford County's homeless and neglected animals are already sold out, but there are still plenty of ways to support the animals at the shelter. The Humane Society of Harford County's Bow Wow Boogie will be held May 3 from 7:30-11:30 p.m. at the Richlin Ballroom, 1700 Van Bibber Road, Edgewood. Local businesses and animal lovers across the region are encouraged to show support for shelter animals by donating gift cards, jewelry, artwork, professional services, tickets to area attractions, and other items for the evening's popular silent auction.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 19, 1993
Did anyone need more evidence that major league sports is a cold-blooded business and not a noble enterprise?If you want a National Football League franchise, you play the league's game. Too distasteful? Then you live without an NFL team. But if you believe a franchise is valuable to this community, economically as well as psychologically, then you do whatever is necessary to get one. Within limits.Those were the issues facing Gov. William Donald Schaefer and Herbert L. Belgrad, leader of Maryland's campaign to regain football, following the league owners' failure to select a second city last month.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
Regarding your recent article about the future of 1 s t Mariner Arena, I felt compelled to share that Forest Park High School's Class of 1963 was the very first class ever to graduate at what was then the Baltimore Civic Center. In fact, a picture of our graduating class was printed in The Sun at the time. This of course means that the Class of '63 will be celebrating our 50th reunion next year. (We're calling on all class member to e-mail us at FPHS1963@gmail.com ). As for the photo of screaming teenagers at a Beatles' concert, how could I not notice what they were wearing way back then: Turtleneck long-sleeve sweaters for the girls and blazers on the guys.
SPORTS
June 24, 1991
Let's Boogie.That was the refrain of an overwhelming number of "It's Your Call" respondents, who said they were ready to party with Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass as the new Orioles owner.With the free-spirited and Baltimore-born Merry-Go-Round founder and chairman expressing an interest as principal owner Eli Jacobs weighs offers for the Orioles, we asked if you would like to see Weinglass buy the team.In a seldom-seen "It's Your Call" response, 992 calls were made with 919 (93 percent) supporting Weinglass.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | December 13, 1992
Let's start with that first phone call. Is this beautiful or what?Boogie Weinglass picks up the receiver. "Hello?" he says."Yes, um. It's Eli."There is a pause. "What, the caterer? I paid you guys a month ago.""No, no, the baseball owner. Eli Jacobs, the owner of the Orioles. Mr. Jacobs.""Wait a minute. Let me get this right. You're calling me?""Yes.""Are you sure this isn't a prank? This isn't really Shrevie, is it?""No, no. It's Mr. Jacobs. I've got a baseball team for sale.""You do, huh?
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 15, 1992
Pieces of column too short to use . . .If Boogie gets the Orioles, any chance we can get the Camden Club converted to a Boogie's Diner? Any chance we can have a Pony Tail Give-Away Night, with 47,000 fans doing the Boogie Look? Any chance we can finally have that massive game of Twister on the tarpaulin? Any chance we can hire Paul Schaffer to be stadium organist? And I'd pay to see Boog feeding Boogie barbecue, wouldn't you?*One of Kweisi Mfume's first assignments as chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus took him to the Virgin Islands last Friday for the dedication of an airport runway.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | June 9, 1994
I miss Boogie, you miss Boogie, we all miss Boogie.Heck, even Boogie misses Boogie."It would have been a lot more fun running a football team," he said, dejectedly.That was his dream -- to run a football team, or a baseball team, whichever came first.Instead, Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass is busy trying to rescue Merry-Go-Round, Inc., the company he founded in 1968, the company that lost $45.6 million last year and entered bankruptcy in January.How quickly his world shattered.A year ago, Boogie was at the center of the Baltimore sports universe, plotting with Peter Angelos and Tom Clancy to return the Orioles to local ownership, heading one of two groups trying to land an NFL expansion franchise.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | November 15, 1991
This is hard for me to say because the real Boogie is a role model, but the real Boogie wants me to spread the word that you might as well call him "Leonard" because that's who the real Boogie is in real life.Call him "Leonard" Weinglass, prospective owner of a prospective Baltimore NFL expansion team.Call him "Leonard" Weinglass, upstanding citizen, businessman, philanthropist, husband, father, non-gambler, straight-shooter and (excuse me, yawnnnnn) dog owner who says -- and he's breaking my heart -- "I am not a flake."
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | June 19, 1991
I can't get past the introductions.It's 1992, say in Honolulu, at a meeting of baseball owners, and you overhear this conversation:"Peter O'Malley, I'd you like you to meet Boogie Weinglass. Boogie, Peter."They tell me this is possible. They tell me that Boogie, the most Diner Guy of all the Diner Guys, wants to buy the Orioles from Eli Jacobs, the least Diner Guy possible. Nobody ever thought of Eli as a Boogie (or a Shrevie or a Modell, for that matter). Eli's nickname, I'm guessing, is Eli, or Mr. Jacobs.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | November 11, 2008
Now that the election is over, you might think you've had enough of political TV. But, please, don't turn the page on TV and politics until you have seen Boogie Man: The Lee Atwater Story tonight on PBS. This finely crafted political biography dissects and explains the nastiness of U.S. politics during the past three decades like nothing I have read or viewed. The late Atwater was a top-level Republican strategist and one-time chairman of the Republican National Committee. He was the architect of George H.W. Bush's presidential victory in 1988, and he trained a generation of Republicans such as Karl Rove in the dirtiest tricks imaginable.
SPORTS
June 23, 2008
Mr. Flip can vaguely recall school dances of long ago, when no one wanted to be the first to get out on the floor and shake it down. But once that first brave couple started to boogie, everyone joined in. And that's apparently how it goes in baseball decision-making circles. Somebody has to go first, then others can follow suit. The Seattle Mariners and Toronto Blue Jays apparently couldn't fire their managers until after the New York Mets had. Mr. Flip really doesn't understand. Your manager isn't any better or worse just because some other team fired its manager.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 30, 2006
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, 65, is ready to serve Bill and Hillary Clinton the next time they want a meal at the Aspen, Colo., diner he owns. The former Merry-Go-Round retail empire honcho -- who was a character in the 1982 Barry Levinson film Diner -- presides over a stylish food and retail business known as Boogie's Diner. It's a must stop for Aspen's numerous celebrity visitors -- and the Clintons have been there several times. His staff serves about 1,000 patrons daily at the 1950s-style restaurant renowned for hot turkey sandwiches and milkshakes at his up-market shoe and denim departments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sun reporter | September 22, 2005
Who said parenthood has to keep you from seeing shows? Tracey Gaughran-Perez found a way to make concerts come to her. This year, she started hosting backyard mini-festivals for parents and their kids. Called Rock-N-Romps, they run about three hours on the last Saturday of every month at Perez's Lauraville home. Her next one, which features three alternative bands, kids' activities and refreshments, is Saturday. "This is definitely a venue for me to meet like-minded people who happen to have kids," Perez said.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2005
Baltimorean Howard "Chip" Silverman considers himself the "keeper of a legacy" - a tangible one located in Village of Cross Keys in North Baltimore. It is here, in his 1,300-square-foot residence in the high-rise Harper House condominiums, that he keeps an urban memory alive for himself and a very special group of friends. "You are about to enter the `Disco Condo,'" he remarked, turning the key deliberately in the lock. After the neutral decor of the unusually quiet 12th-floor hallway, the sights and sounds beyond the front door are a show-stopper.
FEATURES
By Charles Duhigg and Charles Duhigg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2004
The throng of tanned spectators at the U.S. Open throbs with standard surfer chic. Except these two guys. Their dyed black hair contrasts with their pasty skin - a sheen they strive to protect with the highest SPF sunscreen. One wears oversized sunglasses from the 1980s that say "Wild Thing" across the lenses. The other has a stud in his lip and big metal bolts in his ears. Often when they're out in public they wear girls' pants because they are tight and weird, they say. But here at Huntington Beach, Calif.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | June 19, 1991
An owner named Boogie.Dig it.What would we call him?The Boogster? The Boogmeister? Sir Boogaloo?It doesn't matter.Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, 49, is trying to buy the Orioles, and all self-respecting fans are hereby advised to head to one of his Merry-Go-Round stores and clear out the racks.Boogie's Baltimore.Boogie's our man.Just think: Director Barry Levinson could be general manager -- the payback for using Boogie as a model for one of his characters in the movie "Diner."Don't laugh. Levinson said yesterday he's interested in being a part-owner with his old friend (but not -- repeat, not -- the GM)
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | November 17, 1993
Now, they've really got us mad. When the NFL boys said our problem in the expansion race was geography, we didn't like it, but we sort of understood.We can read a map, and, sure enough, Baltimore does appear to be unalterably squished between Washington and Philadelphia.But now, it's personal.Because of Boogie.You see, Boogie is Baltimore. OK, he lives in Aspen, probably knows movie stars and he's got that goofy ponytail. But he's still Baltimore.He's so uncalculatingly un-smooth that he's got to be Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2004
Here are a few items that can be purchased on 14th Street in Washington: a magenta bathroom mat, a bamboo cutting board, a gay-porn greeting card, a set of martini glasses, a Tote le Monde luggage tag, a blue sushi plate, a dinner table from Indonesia, a pale-pink feathered baby wreath. When the shops close, here is what you can do: listen to live jazz, drink Belgian beers, attend an art opening, munch on chiangmia pork sausage, catch a local band, have your palm read, board your dog or do the laundry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 2, 2002
Baltimore returns to prime time tonight, and it does so on the most prestigious stage in American television: Sunday nights on HBO, the home of The Sopranos and Six Feet Under. The news is that The Wire, a 13-week series about life on both sides of a major drug investigation in the Baltimore housing projects, deserves to breathe that rarefied air. Like those two dramas, The Wire might be an acquired taste for viewers who warm to innovative programming slowly. But those who stick with the show for two or three episodes are going to find themselves caring about people with whom they may never have imagined becoming acquainted.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.