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Boog Powell

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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1994
At dawn yesterday, the Orioles grounds crew was hard at work, cutting grass and painting lines on a baseball field.Nearby, Boog Powell was cooking breakfast -- steak and eggs for the five members of the Sivert family at their Sykesville home.The Siverts -- Sue, Dave and three children -- have no plans to compete with Camden Yards. Instead, they won an impromptu radio contest as the Orioles' biggest fans, at least of the 50 or so people who called the station.The prize -- a miniature baseball field all their own.So the Siverts found themselves meeting professional groundskeepers, a burly ex-first baseman, and familiar voices broadcasting oldies from their stable, as a hundred people who had heard about them on the air dropped by for a look.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Talking with Boog Powell can make you hungry. By the time the former Orioles star and current barbecue master has rhapsodized about the pleasures of, say, pit beef with horseradish sauce, homemade buttermilk biscuits and grilled asparagus with rosemary, chances are your mouth will be watering. "Oh, I love food," says the 6-foot-4 former slugger, laughing heartily. "I enjoy eating a good meal, whether it's steamed crabs, or collard greens and cornbread. … But my favorite is barbecue.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | October 7, 2009
Baltimore is getting its first beer week, and I say it's about time. This city has had beer bubbling in its veins for years. Tomorrow evening, Boog Powell, the former Oriole slugger who has become this town's friendly father figure, will crack open a cask in a ceremony aboard the USS Constellation, and 10 days of sudsy activities, everything from the massive Oktoberfest party at the Timonium Fairgrounds to neighborhood pub crawls, will follow. This town deserves it. Its neighborhoods, its culture, its sense of itself have been strongly influenced by beer.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Dick Hall can put his mind at rest. The Orioles are division champions. "I've been counting down, like everyone else," said Hall, 83, a reliever on Baltimore's World Series champs of 1966 and 1970. Back then, he would compute pitchers' earned run averages in his head in the bullpen. "But this was a lot easier," said Hall, a retired accountant. "And more fun. " When the Orioles clinched the American League East title Tuesday night, the victory struck a chord with alumni who've gone this route before.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1997
It's game time, and Boog Powell is pooped.For nearly an hour, he has stood beside his concession stand at Oriole Park, greeting fans amid the thick, sweet clouds of barbecue smoke, chatting and posing and autographing everything thrown at him. Bats and hats. Baseball cards and beer cups. Powell signs each with a bold stroke suggestive of the swing that crushed 339 home runs a generation ago.Before every home game, folks queue up to eat the beef and chew the fat with Boog. Middle-aged men approach him with little-boy wonder.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
Forty-six years later, the photograph still gives people goose bumps. There's Dave McNally, Baltimore's "other" No. 19, the triumphant pitcher whose grin is as wide as his native Montana. And Andy Etchebarren, the catcher who's poised to embrace him, mask still on and mitt in hand. And there, on the left, is a jubilant Brooks Robinson, or at least a chunk of him: the Orioles' third baseman is airborne and looks as if he parachuted into Memorial Stadium. Why? The Birds had just swept the 1966 World Series in four straight games.
SPORTS
September 1, 2011
September 12, 1987: Eddie Murray hit career home run No. 304 to overtake Boog Powell for the club's all-time home run record.
SPORTS
September 20, 1991
Cal Ripken hit his 30th homer Wednesday night, becoming the eighth Oriole to hit that mark. Club membership:HRs.. Player.. .. .. .. Year49 .. Frank Robinson .. 196646 .. Jim Gentile .. .. 196139 .. Boog Powell .. .. 196437 .. Powell.. .. .. .. 196935 .. Powell.. .. .. .. 1970.. .. Ken Singleton. .. 197934 .. Powell.. .. .. .. 196633 .. Gentile. .. .. .. 1962.. .. Eddie Murray.. .. 198332 .. Robinson .. .. .. 1969.. .. Murray.. .. .. .. 1980.. .. Murray.. .. .. .. 198231 .. Murray.. .. .. .. 1985.
SPORTS
August 25, 1998
Mariners: Of Ken Griffey's 44 home runs this season, only two have been three-run homers. With 338 career homers, he tied Don Baylor for 58th all-time. Dave Parker and Boog Powell are next at 339. Seattle was 7-4 against the White Sox and won the season series for the fourth straight year. Seattle also swept four games from the White Sox in June 1992.Yankees: Paid attendance for the makeup was 19,297. Including those who got free tickets because of a May rainout, the total was 22,203.Pub Date: 8/25/98
SPORTS
April 15, 1993
Willie Mays will join Brooks Robinson, Jim Palmer, Boog Powell, Artie Donovan and Tom Matte as guests at the Grant-A-Wish Foundation's 10th anniversary reception April 22 at Martin's West.There will be a $2 million sports memorabilia and cards exhibit, as well as a silent auction.Tickets for the VIP reception and dinner buffet (5:30-6:30 p.m.) are $200 per person. Tickets for the general reception (6:30-9:30 p.m.) cost $75 per person and include a dinner buffet, the exhibit and the celebrity auction.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | September 11, 2014
Paul Blair doesn't have a statue behind center field at Camden Yards, and he wasn't honored by the Orioles with a uniform patch this season after he passed away last December. But he does have a legion of fans in Baltimore who plan to honor him with signs and cheers when the Orioles and the New York Yankees play a doubleheader at Camden Yards on Friday. The grassroots tribute to a guy who was arguably the greatest defensive center fielder in club history began earlier in the week when Baltimore City Council Chairman Bernard C. “Jack” Young introduced a resolution honoring Blair, who made his major league debut with the Orioles 50 years ago this past Tuesday.
SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
The Orioles play the Boston Red Sox in the third game of the season tonight at Camden Yards. Orioles left-hander Wei-Yin Chen is scheduled to pitch against Red Sox left-hander Felix Doubront, and first pitch is set for 7:05 p.m. How does this year's squad stack up through two games against successful Orioles teams of the past? With high expectations this season, we'll try to track how the club is performing through each game compared to previous years in which they made the playoffs.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
His manager, Earl Weaver , called him "the best leadoff man in the game," and who's to argue? In five years with the Orioles, Don Buford batted .270, ran the bases with ferocity and helped the club reach three World Series. It's no coincidence that, one year after Buford crashed the lineup, the Orioles won 101 games and the first of three straight American League pennants (1969-1971). Twice, he hit .300 or better in the postseason. In 1969, Buford made history as the first player ever to lead off a World Series with a home run, connecting off the New York Mets' Tom Seaver.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
So Chris Davis … wow. There are so many ways to convey the absurdity of his start to the 2013 season. If he somehow continued hitting at his current pace, he would finish with totals that could slide neatly into Babe Ruth's prime. And why ruin the fun by talking about how unlikely this is to continue?  Instead, I thought I'd do a quick and dirty investigation of how Davis' start stacks up to other hot openings from Orioles history. Is this as unprecedented as it feels? We're near the end of May, and Davis is hitting .359 with 19 home runs, 50 RBI, a .447 on-base percentage and a .766 slugging average.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
The solitary orange banner waved over the left field wall at old Memorial Stadium for years. “HERE” is all it said in blocky black lettering. No other words were necessary. Everyone knew what it meant: here's where Frank hit it out. Wednesday marks the 47th anniversary of that historic home run, when Orioles outfielder and future Hall of Famer Frank Robinson became the only player to hit a baseball completely out of the old ballpark on 33rd Street during a game. It happened on May 8, 1966, in the second game of a doubleheader against the Cleveland Indians, when Robinson hit a mammoth two-run shot off Indians starter Luis Tiant in the first inning.
SPORTS
Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Lee MacPhail, a Hall of Fame baseball executive who served as Orioles general manager from 1959 to 1965, died Thursday evening at his home in Delray Beach, Fla. He was 95. Mr. MacPhail, who was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1998, represented the middle of a four-generation baseball dynasty. His father, Larry, was also a Hall of Fame executive. His son, Andy, became the Orioles' top baseball executive from 2007 to 2011 after serving in similar roles for the Minnesota Twins and Chicago Cubs.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Against anyone else, it would have seemed preposterous when the 12-year-old boy's hand reached into the field of play to change the course of the Orioles' 1996 playoff run. Against the New York Yankees? Jeffrey Maier was just another chapter in a long story. The Yankees have almost always been the measuring stick for their divisional rivals 200 miles down Interstate 95. And pardon Orioles fans if they've always felt the game was a little bit rigged, whether by baseball economics or by the dark magic of an adolescent fan. The Bronx Bombers of Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris were still the big boys on the block when the Orioles first got good in the early 1960s.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
Forty-six years later, the photograph still gives people goose bumps. There's Dave McNally, Baltimore's "other" No. 19, the triumphant pitcher whose grin is as wide as his native Montana. And Andy Etchebarren, the catcher who's poised to embrace him, mask still on and mitt in hand. And there, on the left, is a jubilant Brooks Robinson, or at least a chunk of him: the Orioles' third baseman is airborne and looks as if he parachuted into Memorial Stadium. Why? The Birds had just swept the 1966 World Series in four straight games.
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