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NEWS
December 10, 2009
Whether or not Mayor Sheila Dixon stays in office is yet to be determined, but booing her when she appears at public events reflects more on the character of those doing the booing than it does on the mayor. At this season of the year when many are celebrating the birth of the Prince of Peace, may we not heed his admonition referring to the woman taken in adultery, "Let him who is without sin cast the first stone." People of Baltimore, let's all of us behave better. Susan Macfarlane, Baltimore
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
OAKLAND, Calif. - After throwing off a mound for the first time since going on the disabled list with a sprained right ankle, Orioles right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez could pitch a minor league rehabilitation game by the middle of next week, Orioles manager Buck Showalter said Friday. Jimenez tested his ankle with a bullpen session during the Orioles' post-All-Star-break workout in Oakland on Thursday and was pleased with the progress of his recovery. He will throw another bullpen session Sunday.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | April 8, 2009
A press box colleague pointed out the most vociferous boo-birds on Opening Day were not booing Mark Teixeira for going to the Evil Empire, but for saying at a news conference he had always been a Yankees fan. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog)
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
The bartender is gone for the weekend. Dan Connolly's out of town, so I'm taking over. I've been waiting for this for a while. Happy hour will be a little longer. Margaritas are two-for-one. Oh, and half-price apps at the bar. We have something to discuss. And I know you'll have an opinion. Former Orioles closer Jim Johnson made his first appearance at Camden Yards in an opposing uniform Saturday night, entering a three-run game in the sixth inning. There was no “Cue the Foo,” only a familiar face in green and gold.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 31, 1996
Admit your boo-boos, folks tell me, and it'll make a bigger man of you. Right now, I should be about the size of Hoss Cartwright.Boo-boo No. 2 was caught by a Mitch Tullai, who correctly read Saturday's column and noticed that I said that Preston Brooks of South Carolina, who viciously caned Massachusetts Sen. Charles Sumner on the floor of the Senate in 1856, was also a senator. Tullai reminded me that Brooks was a member of the House of Representatives. Brooks bludgeoned Sumner in retaliation for remarks the Massachusetts senator had made about South Carolina Sen. Andrew Butler, Brooks' uncle.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | September 15, 1992
ASHBURN, Va. -- It was damage control time for Mark Rypien yesterday.The Washington Redskins quarterback apologized for criticizing fans Sunday after they booed him during introductions before the game against the Atlanta Falcons at RFK Stadium. However, he didn't seem to be apologizing to the fans who did the booing."Ninety percent of the fans of this whole area are as die-hard a fans as I've ever seen," Rypien said. "I apologize to those and the people I might have overreacted to."Earlier, during his weekly paid appearance on WRC-TV (Channel 4)
NEWS
October 31, 1992
When did Halloween become autumn's Christmas? If memories of our youth are accurate -- and, admittedly, many times they aren't -- we recall Halloween as a night of costuming, going door-to-door for treats, collecting change for charity and then eating candy till we turned chartreuse.When did homeowners begin festooning their lawns with fake tombstones and spider webs like the set of "The Addams Family"? When did people begin decorating "Halloween trees" with little pumpkin ornaments? You can even buy "pumpkin carving kits," including patterns for designing jack-o-lanterns.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | January 14, 2006
In the spirit of my annual Chutzpah Awards, I'm instituting a new prize: the Royal Order of the Boo-Boo. So far in 2006, there have been four winners. First place: Gregory P. Kane, for erroneously noting in my column Wednesday that City Council Vice President Stephanie Rawlings Blake would automatically become president of that body if Mayor Martin O'Malley is elected governor and current City Council President Sheila Dixon is elevated to the mayoral post. Sun editors - Gawd bless 'em - ran a correction Thursday.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | March 15, 1991
Watching William Donald Schaefer react to criticism has become the latest spectator sport . . . be it indoors or out. A media that spoiled him with praise, rarely uttering or writing an uncomplimentary word, now enjoys observing the result of its handiwork.Schaefer is being challenged by reporters who are having a field day with the controversy he creates. A response is assured from the governor. Nothing personal, of course, but it's like going to the zoo to tease the monkeys.There's also a correlation to athletes that is readily apparent.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | April 15, 1993
Workers booed, taunted and lambasted County Executive Robert R. Neall yesterday afternoon as he told a packed hall of angry utilities and public works employees that some will lose their jobs.The executive stood quietly during verbal attacks on his integrity, motives and salary at the second of four scheduled employee forums. Mr. Neall announced that he will cut 440 positions throughout county government, including 120 vacant slots.Two more forums are scheduled for today."This is not an exercise to ruin people's lives," Mr. Neall said, citing "new economic realities" that have forced him to trim government spending and rely more on outside contractors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Cruising gets a bad rap. "It's boring. " "It's for people of a certain age. " "It's all about the food, and even that's not very good. " "Don't even get me started on the faux Broadway entertainment!" Those are the high seas haters. The travelers who are far too superior to settle for a superior cabin. But do they have a point? Google "cruise disasters," and you'll see they have more than one. Poor maintenance, fires, pollution, rogue staff, viral outbreaks - to name just a few recent highlights.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
Closer Jim Johnson was booed when he walked off the mound Wednesday after blowing his fifth save of the season. My Twitter feed blew up after that, too, with Johnson haters. One even suggested that Tommy Hunter replace Johnson as closer. Hunter, you remember him? The guy many fans wanted to send back to Texas for a bucket of balls in April. Now, after pitching his butt off, he's become a fan favorite? Interesting development. I've said this before, and I'll say it again: I have no problem with fans booing players when they don't perform well, even at home.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 27, 2013
Jim Johnson walked off the mound at Camden Yards on Wednesday night, having just given up the one-run lead the Orioles had secured in the previous inning. A spattering of boos drizzled down upon him from above. It was not what soggy and groggy fans wanted to see after sitting through an hour-long pregame rain delay. I understand their frustration. I get that the paid ticket-holders have every right to boo whomever they feel like booing . But doesn't Johnson, who leads the major leagues with 27 saves, deserve better than this?
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
While most players don't acknowledge being affected when they're the target of fan angst, Orioles reliever Pedro Strop admitted Thursday that he was bothered by the loud chorus of boos he received as he walked off the mound during Wednesday's 9-5 loss to the Los Angeles Angels . Strop entered with two on and no outs in a 4-2 game in the seventh inning, and he allowed a season-high four runs before being pulled after retiring just one of...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2013
From many little yellow peeps, one artistic family saw a giant yellow bird. At the sixth annual "Peep Show" in downtown Westminster, the massive 3,810-marshmallow-strong Big Bird drew the biggest oohs and ahhs among the young kids and older fans who filled the Carroll County Arts Council building on Main Street Saturday, all there to take in a host of candy-inspired creations. The "Long Live Sesame Peep" display, complete with a trash-canned Oscar the Grouch, was created by Robert Mondor and his family - wife Ann, son Sean, 10, and daughter Lauren, 8, all of Westminster - and was just one of many pop-culture-inspired displays at the Easter event, which has become a major fundraiser for the council each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
“I'm 27. I'm retired. But I still want to compete.” That's Olympic champion Michael Phelps talking in “The Haney Project,” a Golf Channel series that stars Tiger Woods' one-time coach taking on a new celebrity student each season. Phelps' words pretty much summarize the premise of this year's edition, which starts Monday night. In the past, Hank Haney's celebrity pupils have included Ray Romano, Rush Limbaugh, Charles Barkley and Maroon 5 singer Adam Levine. This season, the student is the swimmer from Baltimore who won 18 gold medals in Olympic competition.
SPORTS
By Alan Widmann | July 22, 1991
John Boo may be a recent arrival to both Baltimore and the world of competitive cycling, but he rapidly is making up for lost time.Boo, 30, was sixth in yesterday's Maryland State Games senior category 2 race, a premier 20-mile event on the loop road at University of Maryland Baltimore County.The respectable showing (shorter races are not his specialty) continued a strong 1991 season for Boo, who won the Maryland-Delaware Over-30 championship June 1 in Hampstead and three other top races this year.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2001
A penny doesn't buy much these days, but it was enough yesterday to halt trading of Legg Mason Inc.'s shares. The problem began when the New York Stock Exchange miscalculated Legg Mason's opening stock price by 1 cent, sending the firm into a tizzy and prompting speculation that the company might be sold. The stock opened the day selling at $39.18 - a cent higher than it should have. Trading in Legg Mason's shares stopped at 1:57 p.m. for nearly 1 hour and 20 minutes while the exchange recalculated the opening price of 89,400 shares.
SPORTS
By Brian Paxton, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Three banners hang from the wall in the wrestling room at Kenwood. One lists the school's state champions, another honors the school's Baltimore County champions and a third commemorates a junior varsity county championship. At first, that third banner embarrassed Nyonbou "Boo" Farley. He doesn't like to call attention to himself. But two years later, he knows how much it means. After finishing second in the Baltimore County championships last week, Farley's 30-2 record in the 160-pound weight class earned him the top seed in this weekend's Class 4A-3A North regional tournament with a chance to earn a berth in the state championship on March 1-2 at the University of Maryland's Cole Field House.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2012
During the Ravens' recent 15-game regular-season win streak at M&T Bank Stadium, boos from the fans were a rare occurrence. Even the 16-13 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers on Dec. 2 that snapped that run didn't elicit that kind of negative response from the crowd. But the team was the target of fans' frustration during Sunday's 34-17 loss to the Denver Broncos. The offense was lustily booed after cornerback Chris Harris intercepted quarterback Joe Flacco's pass intended for wide receiver Anquan Boldin and returned it 98 yards to give Denver a 17-0 advantage, and the catcalls cascaded from the stands when the Ravens elected to take a knee in the final 15 seconds before halftime.
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